Jazz second-rounder Nigel Williams-Goss signs in Serbia

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Five of the six players drafted 51-56 will be on a two-way contract this year.

The exception? No. 55 pick Nigel Williams-Goss.

The Jazz draftee signed a two-year contract with KK Partizan Belgrade.

David Pick:

Williams-Goss , via Kyle Goon of The Salt Lake Tribune:

“Even if I were to make the [Jazz] this year, there weren’t going to be a lot of minutes,” Williams-Goss said. ”At this point in my career, I want to be getting a lot of minutes and staying fresh. If I can do that at a high level with Partizan, I think that will be good for me.”

I’m surprised Williams-Goss didn’t ink a two-way contract. The Salt Lake City Stars would have provided plenty of playing time. If Goss spent at least 14 days, of a maximum 45, in the NBA, he would have earned more than his reported salary in Serbia. This is the type of deal his peers got. Not only could he have remained in the United States, the former Gonzaga guard could have stayed in his home region.

Williams-Goss also could have taken the required tender – a one-year contract, surely unguaranteed at the minimum, teams must extend to retain exclusive negotiating rights on second-rounders. If he had, he likely would have gotten cut in the preseason.

Utah already has 16 players with standard contracts (one more than the regular-season limit), including 15 with guaranteed salaries. Raul Neto, despite an unguaranteed salary, is likely good enough to make the roster. Ricky Rubio, Dante Exum and Neto don’t leave much room at point guard.

But if waived, Williams-Goss would have become an NBA free agent. The deal with Partizan might not have been available at that point, but Goss could have still earned a salary overseas – or signed a two-way deal with Utah then.

As is, the Jazz can use a two-way spot on someone else. If Williams-Goss develops as hoped in Serbia, he negotiate an NBA contract next season only with Utah. (And the Jazz might be reluctant to pay his buyout unless he’s clearly deserving.)

It’s a sweet deal for Utah. I’m not sure why Williams-Goss went along with it.