Knicks president writes about team’s future, doesn’t mention Carmelo Anthony

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The New York Knicks have moved on from Carmelo Anthony.

Well, not officially. He is still on the roster and with trade talks stalled Anthony very well could join them in training camp next month, and be on the roster when the season starts.

But in their marketing and talking about the future, Anthony is no longer in the picture. Literally, there is not one shot of him on the home page of the Knicks website — there are Kristaps Porzingis update videos, Tim Hardaway Jr. is pictured promoting ticket sales, and an update on Frank Ntilikina, but no ‘Melo.

More telling was the blog post Friday from Knicks president Steve Mills talking about his vision for the team — Anthony is not mentioned once.

Dogged defense. Crisp, unselfish ball movement. Scraping for loose balls. These will be our hallmarks.

And our plan to become more youthful and athletic is underway with 22-year-old Kristaps Porzingis, the return of Tim Hardaway Jr., 25, Willy Hernangómez, 23, and with the debut of our 1st round draft pick, Frank Ntilikina, just 19.

It goes on and on about philosophy, about trying to set up a Knicks culture of hard work (as opposed to the one of suspicion that has been at the garden for a couple of decades), but Anthony is never mentioned. Not once.

The Knicks have wanted to trade Anthony and move on from him — and get Porzingis out of his shadow — but because Phil Jackson gave ‘Melo a no-trade clause (at James Dolan’s urging?) the player has the power here. He has only been willing to waive the no-trade for the Houston Rockets, and those two sides have not been able to reach a deal (because Houston wants to move Ryan Anderson, the Knicks don’t want him, and nobody else does either without a couple first round picks thrown in). Other teams — Cleveland, Portland — have tried to get Anthony interested in coming to them, but so far to no avail. Trade talks are stalled out.

But in terms of their mindset, the Knicks have moved on. As they should. It’s just the actual moving on that is hard.