Reports: Paul George traded to Oklahoma City

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Danny Ainge was patient, he wanted to secure Gordon Hayward first. Magic Johnson was patient, he believes Paul George will eventually come to him (maybe that still happens, but it’s less likely). The Cleveland Cavaliers desperately tried to make a deal but didn’t have the pieces to get a trade done, even when dangling Kevin Love.

Oklahoma City GM Sam Presti was not patient, he made his move.

The Thunder have traded for Paul George, sending Victor Oladipo and Domantas Sabonis to the Pacers to help start their rebuild. The trade may not formally be consummated until July 7 (after the signing moratorium), but it’s done. Ramona Shelburne of ESPN broke the news.

Numerous other reports have confirmed this. It’s a bit surprising in that Indy had been demanding picks in every other deal but settled without one in this trade. Before you bash Danny Ainge, remember the Pacers asked for the Brooklyn pick and the Laker pick next year, plus Jae Crowder in a deal. They took far, far less from OKC.

First, for the Thunder, this is the kind of move that will make Russell Westbrook want to sign that super max contract extension the Thunder are expected to throw at him at the stroke of midnight.

Second, the Thunder roster of expensive, somewhat one-dimensional role players — Steven Adams, Enes Kanter, Andre Roberson if they can retain him in free agency — was built to go around two elite stars. Their flaws were evident last year when it was one star and those role players were asked to do more. While Paul George is no Kevin Durant, the Thunder have two stars again.

George gives the Thunder another good ball handler and shot creator, plus someone who can defend on the perimeter. It will take pressure off of MVP Westbrook, and we should see a more diverse offense from them. This is a Thunder team that will be very good and, if things go right, could be in the second tier of a Western Conference suddenly looking very deep as teams line up to challenge the Warriors.

Will George, who has told people he wants to go to Los Angeles, stay in Oklahoma City when he’s a free agent next summer? Maybe. Depends on how this season plays out. How good do the Thunder look? How do the young Lakers look? There are a lot of variables at play, and George to LA has never been the done deal some tried to sell it as. This is a smart roll of the dice by the Thunder, who didn’t give up too much.

For Indiana, welcome to rebuilding around Myles Turner. The problem is, this package seems like not enough, but Sabonis is a potentially good player about to get all the run he wants. Apparently, Pacers head man Kevin Pritchard is high on Oladipo, who has four years and more than $80 million left on his contract. It’s just step one in a long process for them, but it seems more a stumble than a step.

LeBron James rips AAU workload: ‘AAU coaches couldn’t give a damn about a kid’

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Last week, during the pointless debate about Kawhi Leonard missing a game for load management, the most salient point came from former Suns coach Earl Watson.

He echoed a must-read story (from Baxter Holmes at ESPN) that reverberated around the NBA this summer (but for many fans got lost in the shuffle of player movement): How NBA team medical staffs — as well as just doctors working on young athletes — were noticing the extreme wear and tear on the body of AAU basketball players. The volume of games, often without enough training and conditioning to properly strengthen their young bodies or let them recover, sets young players up for injuries later in their playing career. NBA teams and doctors, with their load management techniques, are trying to make up for damage that started long before.

LeBron James, with two sons playing AAU ball right now, is in full agreement.

LeBron ripped the volume of games played in the youth basketball culture, speaking to Chris Haynes of Yahoo Sports.

“These kids are going into the league already banged up, and I think parents and coaches need to know [that] … well, AAU coaches don’t give a f***,” James told Yahoo Sports. “AAU coaches couldn’t give a damn about a kid and what his body is going through…

“I think [AAU] has something to do with it, for sure,” James told Yahoo Sports. “It was a few tournaments where my kids — Bronny and Bryce — had five games in one day and that’s just f- – -ing out of control. That’s just too much… So, I’m very conscious for my own son because that’s all I can control, and if my son says he’s sore or he’s tired, he’s not playing.

“Because a lot of these tournaments don’t have the best interest of these kids, man. I see it. It’s like one time, they had to play a quarterfinal game, a semifinal game and a championship game starting at 9 a.m., and the championship game was at 12:30 p.m. Three games. I was like, ‘Oh, hell no.’ And my kids were dead tired. My kids were dead tired. This isn’t right. This is an issue.”

It is an issue. A big issue. The NBA can talk about reducing the number of games — they are, and they should, the season is too long, but cutting the number of games becomes a complex financial issue — but it goes beyond just the NBA level.

There needs to be fundamental changes in youth basketball in the NBA, down to the AAU level. NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has talked about this.

“So, where historically it’s been an area, particularly AAU basketball, that the league has stayed out of, I think these most recent revelations (from the NCAA scandal) are just a reminder that we’re part of this larger basketball community. I think ultimately, whether we like it or not, need to be more directly involved with elite youth basketball,” Silver said a couple of years ago. Since then, the league has taken steps in that direction.

However, like shortening the NBA season, there are a lot of competing interests in a complicated situation. A lot of people are making money the way things are now and don’t want them to change.

For the health of players, it needs to.

 

Bucks All-Star Khris Middleton to miss 3-4 weeks with thigh contusion

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Khris Middleton, coming off a summer with Team USA, has quietly continued his All-Star level play this season — an efficient 18.5 points per game, shooting 39.3 percent from three but also finishing well at the rim, and the Bucks offense is 3.3 points per 100 possessions better when he is on the court.

However, he’s not going to be on the court for a few weeks due to a deep thigh bruise, a story broken by Shams Charania of The Athletic.

In the third quarter of the Bucks win over the Thunder Sunday, Middleton suffered the thigh bruise, which sent him to the locker room. While he returned to the bench, he did not return to the game. Afterward, in the locker room, Middleton didn’t seem to think it was that serious.

It turned out to be a little more than that, it has to be a deep bruise to have him out for up to a month.

Kyle Korver would be next in line to get those minutes, but he sat out Sunday with a “head contusion.” Behind him look for smaller lineups with Pat Connaughton, Donte DiVincenzo, Sterling Brown, and Wesley Matthews to get more minutes, plus maybe a little Thanasis Antetokounmpo.

After 0-6 start, Raptors coach Nick Nurse celebrates successful challenge like he won a championship (video)

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After the Raptors won the 2019 NBA title, Toronto coach Nick Nurse hugged Kawhi Leonard, Kyle Lowry and Masai Ujiri.

Some of the hug recipients changed, but Nurse’s celebration didn’t look that different last night.

Nurse missed his first six coach’s challenges then finally got one right during the Raptors’ win over the Lakers. He responded by hugging everyone – including a Los Angeles fan – around him.

This was a long time coming. Even after a couple early failed challenges, Nurse sounded exasperated.

Michael Grange of Sportsnet:

Maybe Clippers coach Doc Rivers, a noted challenge critic, will eventually experience this euphoria.

Report: Gordon Hayward to have surgery on left hand

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How good would Gordon Hayward be if he could just stay healthy?

Hopefully we will find out someday, but probably not for the next couple of months after his agent told Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN that Hayward will have surgery on his non-shooting hand to repair a broken bone.

There will be no official timeline for recovery until after the surgery, but after going under the knife Hayward is likely out at least six weeks. Stephen Curry is out three months after surgery on his non-shooting hand (that is a different injury, but it shows how long the timeline can be).

The play where the injury happened was innocuous.

Even so, it has left Boston with some big questions to answer through New Year’s Eve, or whenever Hayward returns. Hayward was having a bounce-back year, averaging 18.9 points per game, shooting 43.3 percent from three, pulling down 7.1 rebounds and dishing out 4.1 assists per game. He’s been a critical playmaker for the Celtics.

For Boston, this likely means a lot more Marcus Smart, Semi Ojeleye, and maybe Javonte Green.