Quick look at the six other times the No. 1 pick was traded

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The Boston Celtics are deep in discussions to move the No. 1 pick, swapping it with Philadelphia for the No. 3 pick plus future first rounders. The details on those other picks are not yet known, but that hasn’t stopped Celtics fans from freaking out online — they would rather draft Markelle Fultz No. 1. (There are rumors about the Bulls getting in this as a third team, but I have heard nothing serious or substantial along those lines, just speculation.)

This would not be the first time in NBA history the No. 1 overall pick was traded. Actually, it has happened six times.

Here’s a quick look at those trades, in order from most recent to oldest.

2014: Cavaliers draft Andrew Wiggins, trade him to Minnesota for Kevin Love. We all remember this one, once it was clear LeBron James was returning to Cleveland, the Cavaliers went instantly from young and rebuilding to win now mode. Wiggins had potential (he averaged 23.6 points per game last season for the Timberwolves) but the Cavaliers didn’t have time to wait and see if and when he would pan out. Plus they needed a big who could space the floor. Plenty of fans love to pile on Love online, but the fact is he’s been good for them and was key to them winning a ring in 2016. This trade has worked out pretty well for both sides.

1993: Orlando drafts Chris Webber, trades him to Golden State for a series of picks. Chris Webber was the Rookie of the Year and had a strong career, but the Magic got a lot of picks in this deal and made a haul. In this deal they got the No. 3 pick in 1993 (Penny Hardaway), a 1996 first rounder (Todd Fuller), a 1998 first rounder (Vince Carter), and a 2000 first rounder (Mike Miller). The Magic are not the Magic during the late 1990s without these deals to put players around Shaq, so it worked well for them.

1986: Philadelphia drafts Brad Daugherty, trades him to Cleveland for Roy Hinson. Cleveland made out here, Daugherty went on to be a five-time All-Star who anchored the Cleveland teams that were as much a threat to Jordan’s Bulls in the early 1990s as anyone. Philly traded Hinson within two years.

1980: Boston drafts Joe Barry Carroll, trades him to Golden State for Kevin McHale and Robert Parish. This trade set up key parts of the 1980s Celtics core that won three titles, so chalk this up to being a massive win for the Celtics. Boston sent out Carroll and the No. 13 pick, Rickey Brown, in that deal. Carroll averaged at least 17 points a game for the Warriors for seven seasons and was an All-Star, he was a quality player, but not on the level of the two other guys now in the Hall of Fame.

1957: Rochester Royals draft Hot Rod Hundley, trade him to (the then Minneapolis) Lakers for Clyde Lovellette and Jim Paxson. There were a number of other players in this deal, the Royals also sent the Lakers Bob Burrow, Ed Fleming, Monk Meineke and Art Spoelstra. Lovellette, now a Hall of Famer, played one season for the Royals then they traded him. Hundley was a two-time All-Star for the Lakers.

1950: Boston drafts Chuck Share, traded him to Fort Wayne Pistons for Bill Sharman. Share went on to have a solid nine-season NBA career. Sharman played 10 seasons for the Celtics, made seven All-NBA teams, and helped Boston to four titles. Sharman is in the Hall of Fame, so we can safely say Boston won here.