Adam Silver doesn’t see Cavaliers/Warriors as bad for NBA’s competitive balance

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It’s billed as The Trilogy.

It’s the best rivalry going in the NBA right now, maybe in professional sports. The Cleveland Cavaliers and Golden State Warriors, two teams dripping with stars and the biggest names globally in the sport, are facing off in the NBA Finals again. It’s what we should want — the two best teams on the biggest stage.

But is it good for the NBA?

Is it good optics for the league that there’s a sense right now the other 28 teams are just along for the ride? Because we know that, barring something major happening over the summer, we’re going to head into next NBA season predicting another Cavaliers/Warriors Finals.

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver pushed back against that narrative speaking on “Mike & Mike” Wednesday morning.

“When I hear people say that these are now the two teams that are dynasties. You know, think back, you guys know the history. We have the Lakers and Celtics — the Celtics have won 17 championships, Lakers 16 — that’s almost half of all championships won in the NBA by those two teams. Now [the Cavs and Warriors] are being called dynasties. One, [Cleveland] before last year had never won in the history of the NBA. Golden State hadn’t won in 40 years. These are the two teams now that are playing and everybody’s saying ‘Now they’re dynasties.’ So they have a lot of winning to do before I think they should be declared dynasties in the way that the Celtics and Lakers dominated for so many years, or even San Antonio with their five championships or the Bulls with their six championships.”

In a historic context, he’s right. But with Kevin Durant now in Golden State, hasn’t that created a powerhouse superteam that will dominate the league the next four or five years?

“I will say, and I heard Kevin Durant say something like this the other day, I think it’s a little unfair to him to blame him for the lack of so-called ‘competitive balance’ at the moment in the league. I mean, he could have only impacted one team, had he stayed in Oklahoma City or gone somewhere else, there’s no doubt that team would have been better, but it wouldn’t have changed the fortunes for 27 other teams in the league.”

This season, the NBA has followed form, but that is not the norm in terms of our predictions of superteams. When LeBron first went back to Cleveland, there were people trying to hand them the title the first year, that didn’t work out — and nobody saw those Warriors coming. Same thing when LeBron went to Miami with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh, people wanted to hand them the title and they lost the first year to a Mavericks team nobody saw coming (except Mark Cuban, of course). When Steve Nash and Dwight Howard went to the Lakers people wanted to hand that team the Larry O’Brien Trophy, didn’t exactly work out that way. To put it kindly. All of which is to say, there are no sure things.

The problem for the NBA is the perception it’s a two-team league. Through the last couple of CBA’s the league has tried to find ways to flatten out the talent pool, and you can argue that hasn’t worked, but it hasn’t worked for flukey reasons. In the East, it hasn’t worked because LeBron James is one of the game’s all-time greats and is a dominant force. He is a force of nature, and he throws all balance out the window. In the West, the Warriors built their core the right way — they drafted Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, and Draymond Green — and developed them. Kevin Durant came on board, but only because a one-time massive spike in the salary cap (due to a new television deal) made it possible. And even with that it only worked because Stephen Curry had ankle problems before signing his last contract so he came at what is now a massive bargain.

It is not good that the NBA will head into next season with everyone expecting round four of these Finals. But it’s not devastating for the league. And things will probably not play out the way we expect anyway.

Spurs’ pick Chimezie Metu to miss time with fractured wrist

Associated Press
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Chimezie Metu showed some promise in the Summer League games he played for San Antonio, scoring 12.5 points a game on 55 percent shooting in Las Vegas, and 10.7 per game on 54 percent shooting in Salt Lake City. The second round pick of the Spurs (No. 49 overall) is raw and needs a lot of development, but he can get buckets. The potential is there.

That development is going to be on hold a while, as what was thought to be a sprained wrist has turned out to be a fracture.

From Tom Osborn of the San Antonio Express-News.

After an examination Saturday, the Spurs medical staff downgraded second-round pick Chimezie Metu’s left wrist injury from a sprain to a fracture, a league source said Saturday.

Metu was injured late in the Spurs’ 95-90 win over Washington on July 8 at the Las Vegas Summer League, when he landed awkwardly after leaping to catch a lob pass at the rim. The 6-foot-10 big man finished the game but was sidelined for the remainder of the schedule.

After undergoing X-rays at the Thomas & Mack Center, Metu was diagnosed with a sprain. But Spurs’ team doctors suspected a possible fracture, which was confirmed after Metu returned to San Antonio on Saturday.

Metu should be good to go by training camp. Metu is hoping his summer and training camp play will earn him a roster spot, although the Spurs tend not to sign second-round picks the year they were drafted (they tend to let them spend a year or two in the G-League or in Europe). A lot of his chances on making the roster depend on any other moves the Spurs make this summer and what their roster looks like come the fall.

French NBA stars (and others) react to France World Cup win

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For the second time in it’s history, France is the World Cup champion.

Celebrations erupted all over France, and in French enclaves around the world — and the celebrations spilled over to social media. NBA players from France were posting their joy, as you’d expect.

Other NBA players, international and domestic, also were in on the party.

Even some NBA teams got in on the online congratulations party.

Watch best of Wendell Carter Jr. at Summer League

Associated Press
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I will own my mistake: Coming into the NBA Draft I was not high on Wendell Carter Jr., particularly how well he would defend at the NBA level.

I missed on that one — he has impressed me and everyone else in Las Vegas at Summer League. While nobody should ever read too much into Summer League perormances, he has shown potential on both ends of the court. Check out his highlights above

His offensive game is everything that was advertised — versatile and polished. He has nailed turnarounds in the post, can score with either hand, has a jump shot with real range, and he is a smart and willing passer. Defensively he has been physical, works hard and uses his athleticism to be dispruptive.

We will see how he fares against NBA-level competition (and how he pairs with Jabari Parker and the rest of the Bulls frontcourt), but the work ethic and tools are there. The Bulls may have something in Carter Jr.

Stephen Curry nailing putts, doing shimmy at American Century Championship

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If there’s one thing Stephen Curry loves as much as draining a 28-foot three over the outstretched arms of a defender, it’s golf. Curry is a golf fanatic.

Which is why he never misses — and always has fun at — the American Century Championship celebrity golf tournament in Lake Tahoe. And when he makes a putt, he will do a little shimmy, as you can see above.

Curry is currently tied for 19th in the tournament. The highest NBA player on the leaderboard is retired sharpshooter Ray Allen at seventh, and on top of the leaderboard heading into the final day is San Jose Sharks captain Joe Pavelski.

You can watch the final round live on NBC at 3 ET Sunday.

Here’s Curry and his father Dell talking a little golf and family.

And here is Curry talking a little golf before the tournament.