Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek: Triangle could attract free agents

carmelo anthony
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Carmelo Anthony and Derrick Rose have fallen from their peak levels, but they still provide a star’s perspective. And, falling short of outright rebellion, they’ve made it as clear as possible they loathe the triangle offense.

Yet, the Knicks have re-embraced it anyway.

And maybe that’s OK. Kristaps Porzingis touts the triangle. Rose might not be long for New York, and if Knicks president Phil Jackson gets his reported way, neither is Anthony. The triangle could help New York rebuild around Porzingis, prompting Anthony to waive his no-trade clause. The triangle could even improve the Knicks’ lousy defense by better positioning players to get back on D.

But a drawback to the triangle is how few current players embrace the slow-down scheme. That’s a major issue in New York, which has the market to attract major stars.

Again, that could be a worthwhile tradeoff if it gets Anthony to approve a trade. Porzingis should be the Knicks’ priority.

But, in a franchise where denial runs deep, the Knicks aren’t even acknowledging the tradeoff.

Ian Begley of ESPN:

New York Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek believes the team’s triangle offense can be a potential draw for free agents this summer.

“There might be players that think [the triangle offense is a deterrent], but there are also probably players out there that say ‘Oh man, I’d like to run something like that,'” Hornacek said Wednesday. “There are guys that may not necessarily like to run around and in [screen] staggers and all that stuff. It’s still an offense where guys, if they’re knowledgeable about the game, should like.”

“It’s a strategy that, almost every time down the court if you’re a player, you’re watching things develop. When you look at it that way, it’s actually fun to run,” he said.

Sure, there might be a good player itching to play in the triangle. But that list, already short, shrunk as Jackson tried to push out Anthony. Jackson’s championship luster has faded considerably.

Speaking of Jackson, did Hornacek have a problem with the president instructing the team’s guards on the triangle on the practice court? Hornacek, via Begley:

“No. We talk about stuff all the time,” Hornacek said of Jackson. “So when he comes out and demonstrates for the guys, he’s so used to being out on the court it’s probably fun for him to do. And the guys get another look at it from a guy who has run it for years and years, so it’s good.”

Everything Hornacek said here, on the triangle’s appeal and Jackson’s involvement, can be seen through the same lens: Hornacek works for Jackson and wants to keep his job. Will he? It’s no guarantee, but Hornacek gives himself the best shot by repeatedly publicly backing his boss.

At least Hornacek gets to speak regularly with Jackson. Not everyone gets that opportunity.