Video Breakdown: What is an Iverson Cut?

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Last time we broke down a piece of the NBA lexicon in our glossary series we covered just what in the heck “Pistol” action meant. Like today’s breakdown, that was a simple part of a larger sphere of offensive actions that can get plays going quickly. Today we continue in that realm to talk about a move that Hall of Famer Allen Iverson made so ubiquitous that NBA coaches just started calling the action “The Iverson Cut”.

You may or may not have heard the term Iverson Cut before but it’s likely you’ve seen it about a million times over the course of your basketball-watching career. It’s sometimes referred to as a shallow cut, and plays can be labeled simply with “AI”.

Watch the full video explanation above, or continue on below to start by drawing it up on the chalkboard first to show you the basic action before we see it in practice.

The Diagram

An Iverson Cut typically starts out in a flat play or in HORNs, with a point guard at the top, two posts at the elbows, and guards either at the wings or down in the corners. The player making the Iverson cut is labeled here with a star and ball is at the top of the arc.

The basic idea is that the star guard is going to get two screens across the top of the key, right at the free throw line. He will move up and across the formation, trying to rub his defender off of him as he moves to the opposite side of the arc.

After the cut is made, there’s a lot of options including a quick shot, a backdoor cut to the rim after the second post screen, isolation, post up plays, or a swing back to the other side of the floor to star the rest of the play.

On the floor

For example, this set by the Warriors is actually a setup for Kevin Durant on the other side of the floor from where he starts out.

Klay Thompson is on the right part of the arc, standing flat next to Zaza Pachulia ready for the first screen. Thompson runs AI simply to clear space for Durant, who the Warriors want to get a jumper from at the elbow.

Here for the Brooklyn Nets, it’s Bojan Bogdanovic running the Iverson cut from the far side of the formation. This is just a quick action to start another simple play.

Bogdanovic gets a screen from Brook Lopez at the right elbow, then runs across to the opposite 3-point line. At that point, Jeremy Lin sets a screen for Lopez, who cuts diagonally to the left block in order to get the inlet pass to the post from Bogdanovic.

Just a simple post play!

Finally here for the Blazers, it’s a modified type of Iverson cut for Gerald Henderson. The twist is that Henderson stops to dummy a screen on CJ McCollum before continuing on to his second screen as he runs to the arc.

That’s the basics on the Iverson Cut.

It’s something simple that a lot of teams run for their guards to get them open on the arc. It’s a great way to create negative space on offense to either start a play or get a quick bucket for one of your top scorers.

If you want to see more on the Iverson Cut, I’m going to recommend set of videos I did on the Blazers last year that covers their Thumb Series. Portland runs a lot of modified screens based on the Iverson cut they run to get their guards going horizontally across the formation. It should give you a good idea about how offensive plays can be built around that initial Iverson cut.

Pacers’ increasingly optimistic Victor Oladipo to play in restart

Victor Oladipo play
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“With all the variables, from how I have to build my 5-on-5 workload back up, to the increased risk of a soft tissue injury which could delay my rehab, and the unknown exact set up of the bubble, I just can’t get my mind to being fully comfortable in playing… getting fully healthy for the 2020-21 season is the right decision for me.”

That was Pacers’star Victor Oladipo explaining why he would sit out the NBA restart in Orlando.

Then he got to the Walt Disney World property and saw the set up of the bubble, and he got in some five-on-five practices with teammates, and not it appears he might play after all, a story broken by Shams Charania of The Athletic.

Oladeipo may lace them up and play at the end of the month, but nothing is set in stone. Of course, a competitor like Oladipo wants to get on the court, and there is an unquestioned energy finally getting back out there after the coronavirus-forced interruption.

There are also another $2.7 million reasons for him to play (the salary he would lose sitting out). Countering that, Oladipo also got one more year under contract and his concerns about an injury from ramping up to fast are legitimate.

Oladipo missed more than a year after surgery to repair a torn right quad tendon. He played in 13 games before the league was shut down, and in the last five of those he averaged 18.6 points and 4.8 rebounds a game.

Indiana enters the bubble as the five seed in the East, tied with the sixth-seed Sixers, and just two games back of the four seed Heat. There could be a lot of shakeups in the middle of the East standings, which would impact first-round playoff matchups.

The Pacers are a much more dangerous threat with Oladipo in the lineup, but the player and the team need to decide if now is the time to push that advantage.

Kings’ Richaun Holmes quarantined after leaving NBA bubble for food delivery

Kings center Richaun Holmes
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Coronavirus cases are surging in Florida. The NBA’s bubble is in Florida.

Is that a problem?

Theoretically, the bubble location shouldn’t matter. The NBA’s setup at Disney World is designed for players never to come into too close of contact with the surrounding community. So, it wouldn’t matter how prevalent coronavirus is in the surrounding community.

Unless someone violates the protocols.

Which nobody eeeeever expected would happen.

Kings center Richaun Holmes:

Presumably, Holmes – like Rockets forward Bruno Caboclo – faces a 10-day quarantine

That’s the way to ensure Holmes didn’t contract coronavirus from the deliverer. Holmes would almost certainly test positive and/or show symptoms within 10 days if he has coronavirus. A player spreading coronavirus within the bubble is the ultimate fear for the NBA.

Unlike some other players, Holmes even vouched for the quality of food brought to his room. Yet, he still wanted outside delivery.

Maybe there’s a safe way to get it. The deliverer – away from people – could set the food down at the edge of the campus then retreat at least six feet. At that point, Holmes could go pick it up.

But without those precautions, Holmes put himself – and therefore everyone else in the bubble – at too great of a risk. Hence, the lengthy quarantine.

Holmes has been essential to Sacramento’s turnaround. Yes, Marvin Bagley III should be healthier. But the energetic Holmes is the Kings’ most dependable center.

To make the playoffs, they’ll need him following the rules and allowed outside his room.

NBA: 19 more players, two at Disney World tested positive for coronavirus

NBA coronavirus
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On June 23, 16 NBA players tested positive for coronavirus. Between June 24-29, nine more NBA players tested positive.

But that downward trend took a sharp reversal in July.

At least 19 more players, two after arriving at Disney World, have tested positive for coronavirus

NBA release:

Of the 322 players tested for COVID-19 since arriving on the NBA Campus July 7, two have returned confirmed positive tests while in quarantine.  Those players never cleared quarantine and have since left the Campus to isolate at home or in isolation housing.

Since July 1, during in-market testing, 19 NBA players newly tested positive.  These players are staying in their home markets and recovering until they are cleared under CDC guidelines and NBA rules for leaving home isolation and joining the Campus.

Those 19 new positive tests are a disturbingly high number.

It can be difficult to compare different date ranges. June 23 is only a single day, but as the first day of in-market testing, it covered weeks of players potentially contracting coronavirus. The second testing period (June 24-29) is shorter than the July period (which varied based on whether teams departed July 7, 8 or 9 for Disney World).

But, ideally, the number of cases would’ve shrunk as players became increasingly immersed in the NBA’s plan, which called for greater precautions and testing.

The league and teams should investigate why there were so many new cases in July – then explain the findings to the public. Given the lack of transparency around the restart, I wouldn’t hold my breath, though.

At least there are no known positive tests from players who’ve been given free reign within the bubble. That’s the most alarming scenario. Two players testing positive during their in-room quarantines appears to be the system working.

However, the league should confirm that anyone traveling with those two players didn’t become infected en route. A false negative could be catastrophic.

This brings the minimum total of NBA players who’ve tested positive for coronavirus under the league’s restart plan to 44.

And there’s two positive tests at Disney World.* Plus everyone who tested positive before June 23 (at least 10 players**) and tested positive only outside the NBA’s system.

That’s a LARGE segment of NBA players – at least 54.

*It’s possible these two players previously tested positive, tested negative, traveled to Orlando then tested positive again. So, they’re not necessarily new cases.

**Jazz stars Rudy Gobert and Donovan Mitchell, Pistons big Christian Wood, four Nets including Kevin Durant, Celtics guard Marcus Smart and two Lakers.

Yet, it still doesn’t say much about the safety of the NBA bubble, which is just getting underway. The outside world is dangerously full of coronavirus. That’s what all these positive tests so far show.

Additional positive tests – by players fully involved in the bubble – will be far more chilling for the NBA’s planned season completion.

Goran Dragic: Bam Adebayo and Kendrick Nunn not with Heat

Heat players Bam Adebayo and Kendrick Nunn
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Three Heat rotation players reportedly tested positive for coronavirus. One was Derrick Jones Jr.

The other two?

Goran Dragic said Bam Adebayo and Kendrick Nunn weren’t with the team at Disney World.

Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald:

Goran Dragic revealed that Bam Adebayo and Kendrick Nunn are the players who are not with the team.

“Hopefully Bam can come and K-Nunn and we can be a whole team and make some damage,” Dragic said. “Some guys are not here. We are eager, expecting them to come, hopefully to be healthy and we can all start practicing together.”

Did Adebayo and Nunn test positive for coronavirus? Not necessarily. They could be absent for other reasons. But there’s obviously some circumstantial evidences.

That people are forced to connect these dots is an indictment of the NBA, which has shown a troubling lack of transparency around its restart.

Adebayo is an All-Star – a two-way big who plays versatile defense and contributes so many ways offensively (finishing, screening, passing). He’d be a huge loss. Nobody on the Heat could come close to duplicating his varied contributions.

Nunn is one of the NBA’s biggest surprises. But Dragic, Jimmy Butler and Tyler Herro could collectively pick up Nunn’s scoring from the backcourt.

Of course, Adebayo and Nunn might join the team soon. There’s far more we don’t know than know.