Draymond Green: New CBA doesn’t do enough for low-end players

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Draymond Green appeared unhappy with the new Collective Bargaining Agreement, and he revealed why he gave that impression.

He’s unhappy with the new Collective Bargaining Agreement.

The Warriors forward elaborated on his dissatisfaction with the new deal. He stressed two major points:

  • He’s not complaining on behalf of himself. He doesn’t believe he should earn more – and even indicates he, as a star, should earn less.
  • He has no issue with the Basketball Related Income split. Owners and players will continue to split revenue about 50-50.

So what are his problems?

Green, via Anthony Slater of The Mercury News:

It’s about me being frustrated for other guys. When we go in these negotiations, guys are overlooked. I think it’s more about helping these guys be in better standing than what it is for an All-Star or top two or three guys on a team. Those guys will always be taken care of.

It’s not even necessarily that it’s a higher minimum salary. There could be different structure to have not as many minimum players. Right now, there’s like a max and a minimum and a couple in between. I think there could be different structures to help those minimum guys make more and not be a minimum player.

Because without all 15 guys, yeah, you can be an All-Star, you can be a nice player. But without these guys, you can’t practice, you can’t get a sub, you can’t go through 82 games playing 48 minutes a game. If you get hurt, nobody’s there to step in for you. Every guy matters and I think every guy should be taken care of in the grand scheme of things.

My complaint is not one of everybody is not making a good living. It’s that there is a good living in this for everyone, but for some it can be better. How do we help elevate those guys who are on the lower end of the totem pole? I think that should always be a focus. That’s my argument. It’s not to come off as everybody is not living good. No. You’re living pretty good if you’re in the NBA. I don’t want someone to look at me and say that I am inconsiderate about everyone else’s life outside the NBA. I grew up in a household where my mom made $16,000 a year. I know the struggle. I know how to keep those things in perspective and I do keep it into perspective. But I do look at things in a business standpoint and I do understand how much money is going around the NBA on a year to year basis. Within that realm of how much money is going around, you can elevate those guys.”

I don’t want to be this guy that tries to raise this awareness that makes us go into a lockout and makes fans miss a game. I don’t think that’s always necessary either. At the same time, I think some guys in this league can be better taken care of. I want to be a voice for them. To help them be better taken care of.

Green is right. The new CBA definitely benefits stars.

But it also creates 60 new player jobs in the form of two-way contracts, increases minimum salaries to a historically normal percentage of revenue after they dipped this season and expands retirements benefits that are particularly important to low-paid players.

Green is directing his criticism at his fellow star players. By approving the BRI split, Green is accepting how money is divided between owners and players. He just dislikes how players will divvy up their share.

Interestingly, Golden State teammates Stephen Curry and Andre Iguodala are vice presidents in the union that helped put together the CBA, and Green is the Warriors’ player representative. But as he said, Green isn’t upset enough to oppose ratification. So, voicing his concerns can serve only as an attempt to alter the long-term paradigm.

It’s important to remember stars have already made concessions. The existence of an individual maximum salary ensures stars earn less than a free market would dictate, leaving more money for other players. That’s a practical necessity in a league where sub-star players easily outrank stars and each player gets a vote on the CBA.

Maybe highly paid players could give back more. Green obviously thinks so. But the last three CBAs have helped mediocre players at the expense of stars. The new one will continue to help mediocre players with the additional concessions coming from the middle class.