Report: Knicks haven’t ruled out Derrick Rose extension, but haven’t talked to him about it

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The Knicks might have given up the most valuable player in the Derrick Rose trade, Robin Lopez. New York might have fooled itself into believing Rose could rediscover his MVP form.

But the one valid explanation for last summer’s blockbuster deal was that Rose is on an expiring contract. No matter what happens this season, the Knicks would have a chance to reevaluate in the offseason.

Unless Rose’s contract becomes no longer expiring.

Rose is eligible for a contract extension worth up to $73,925,049 over the next three years (based on the current Collective Bargaining Agreement. The new CBA could loosen extension rules, though it’s unclear when those new rules would take effect).

Marc Berman of the New York Post:

According to an NBA source, the Knicks have not approached Rose about an extension, but have not ruled it out for late in the season. The Knicks apparently want to make sure his body holds up across a full season and would be willing to pay more this summer if they had to.

“I haven’t talked to them about it,’’ Rose told The Post. “It’s been more about winning games. We’ll see. I’m more concerned with trying to win games, but it’s something I’d have to talk about with my family and team.’’

I’m going to give the Knicks credit here – maybe too much, given Phil Jackson’s record. I can’t see them seriously considering extending Rose.

Nothing about Rose’s status will change until July 1. He’ll be extension-eligible through June 30. There is literally no benefit to ruling out a Rose extension now. None. No matter how far-fetched it seems, why not leave the option on the table. It’s better than closing your eyes to the possibility.

A tiny benefit to leaking that you haven’t ruled it out showing your faith in Rose, making him feel more confident in a way that might translate into greater on-court production. Then, you can always just let his contract expire.

Rose continues to look like the average-ish player he’s been since his injuries. There should be no rush to lock him up long-term. Plus, given his health history, he might desire taking less money annually to secure a four- or five-year deal in free agency.

I’d be shocked if this is anything more than the Knicks responding to a reporter’s question with an insignificant fact: Something possible is possible (ignoring any comment on the remote likelihood).