Amar’e Stoudemire unloads on Carmelo Anthony about Jeremy Lin without saying Melo’s name

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Carmelo Anthony has said people call him selfish due to Linsanity.

By people, does he mean Amar’e Stoudemire?

Stoudemire played with the Knicks in 2012, when they won 7-of-8 with Jeremy Lin starting and Melo injured. Lin averaged 25.0 points and 9.5 assists per game in that span, raising questions whether his pick-and-roll attack was more effective than Melo’s isolation-heavy style. New York never figured it out once Melo got healthy, losing to the Heat in the first round.

Now playing for Miami, Stoudemire reflected on that situation without using the words “Carmelo Anthony.”

Stoudemire, via Andrew Keh of The New York Times:

“If he stayed, it would have been cool, but everyone wasn’t a fan of him being the new star, so he didn’t stay long,” Stoudemire said of Lin, heaping praise on his work ethic. “A lot of times, you’ve got to enjoy someone else’s success, and that wasn’t the case for us during that stretch. You’ve got to enjoy that. You’ve got to let that player enjoy himself and cherish those moments. But he was becoming a star, and I don’t think everyone was pleased with that.”

Each time Stoudemire was asked about Anthony, his response alluded to the popular notions of Anthony’s shortcomings.

For example, when Stoudemire was asked if he felt sympathy for Anthony, who has expressed frustration with losing, he said: “When you get involved in a situation, you have to take ownership of it. You have to make sure you make the right decisions for your team and teammates. You have to become a complete player in order to bring your team out of a rut. Everyone can’t do it. It’s not always easy.”

There’s plenty of circumstantial evidence to the disconnect between Melo and Lin, including Melo calling Lin’s offer sheet with the Rockets “that ridiculous contract.” New York didn’t match, allowing Lin to leave for Houston.

Why is this important four years later?

  1. It’s interesting. Those Knicks were fascinating, given the egos and stage involved.
  2. It raises questions about Melo’s ability to mesh with another chance at a younger co-star, Kristaps Porzingis. Stoudemire provides first-hand perspective, and he indicates Melo must change his mindset to truly click with Porzingis.