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Spurs (38-6) vs. Warriors (40-4) an unprecedented matchup of strength

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The Spurs and Warriors will make history when they meet tonight (10:30 ET on NBA TV).

Never have two teams with as high a combined winning percentage as San San Antonio (38-6) and Golden State (40-4) met this far into the season.

In fact, nobody has come close.

The difference between the combined winning percentage for this game and the second-ranking game – Celtics (34-12) vs. 76ers (46-4) in 1967 – is greater than the difference between No. 2 and No. 42.

Here are the 50 games with the highest combined win percentage this deep into a season (88 combined games):

Game Combined win percentage
Jan. 25, 2015: San Antonio Spurs (38-6) v. Golden State Warriors (40-4) 88.63%
Jan. 24, 1967: Boston Celtics (34-12) v. Philadelphia 76ers (46-4) 83.32%
Feb. 4, 1972: Los Angeles Lakers (44-7) v. Milwaukee Bucks (45-11) 83.17%
Jan. 28, 1981: Boston Celtics (42-9) v. Philadelphia 76ers (44-9) 82.68%
Feb. 6, 2015: Atlanta Hawks (41-9) v. Golden State Warriors (39-8) 82.46%
Apr. 7, 1996: Chicago Bulls (65-8) v. Orlando Magic (55-19) 81.62%
Feb. 5, 2009: Los Angeles Lakers (39-9) v. Boston Celtics (41-9) 81.62%
Feb. 25, 1996: Chicago Bulls (48-6) v. Orlando Magic (40-14) 81.47%
Feb. 4, 1981: Philadelphia 76ers (45-10) v. Boston Celtics (43-10) 81.47%
Feb. 8, 2009: Los Angeles Lakers (40-9) v. Cleveland Cavaliers (39-9) 81.43%
Mar. 1, 1972: Los Angeles Lakers (57-11) v. Milwaukee Bucks (55-15) 81.15%
Mar. 9, 1997: New York Knicks (46-16) v. Chicago Bulls (53-7) 81.14%
Jan. 30, 1985: Philadelphia 76ers (35-9) v. Boston Celtics (37-8) 80.89%
Feb. 5, 1997: Los Angeles Lakers (34-13) v. Chicago Bulls (42-5) 80.84%
Jan. 27, 1973: New York Knicks (40-12) v. Boston Celtics (40-7) 80.80%
Mar. 14, 2007: Phoenix Suns (49-14) v. Dallas Mavericks (52-10) 80.79%
Mar. 4, 1983: Boston Celtics (42-15) v. Philadelphia 76ers (50-7) 80.69%
Feb. 12, 1967: Boston Celtics (44-14) v. Philadelphia 76ers (52-9) 80.66%
Apr. 16, 1997: Miami Heat (59-20) v. Chicago Bulls (69-11) 80.49%
Mar. 17, 1972: Los Angeles Lakers (64-12) v. Milwaukee Bucks (59-18) 80.38%
Feb. 29, 2000: Los Angeles Lakers (45-11) v. Portland Trail Blazers (45-11) 80.35%
Jan. 28, 1973: New York Knicks (41-12) v. Boston Celtics (40-8) 80.19%
Mar. 8, 1967: Philadelphia 76ers (62-11) v. Boston Celtics (55-18) 80.13%
Feb. 2, 1997: Chicago Bulls (40-5) v. Seattle SuperSonics (32-13) 79.99%
Apr. 1, 2007: Phoenix Suns (54-18) v. Dallas Mavericks (61-11) 79.85%
Feb. 7, 1973: Boston Celtics (43-11) v. Los Angeles Lakers (44-11) 79.81%
Mar. 11, 1967: Boston Celtics (55-19) v. Philadelphia 76ers (63-11) 79.72%
Mar. 18, 2015: Golden State Warriors (53-13) v. Atlanta Hawks (53-14) 79.69%
Mar. 2, 2006: San Antonio Spurs (44-12) v. Dallas Mavericks (45-11) 79.45%
Jan. 15, 1981: Milwaukee Bucks (33-12) v. Philadelphia 76ers (39-7) 79.11%
Mar. 22, 1997: Chicago Bulls (58-9) v. Detroit Pistons (48-19) 79.09%
Jan. 25, 1981: Philadelphia 76ers (43-9) v. Phoenix Suns (40-13) 79.04%
Feb. 16, 1986: Boston Celtics (40-9) v. Los Angeles Lakers (39-12) 78.99%
Mar. 1, 1981: Boston Celtics (51-15) v. Philadelphia 76ers (54-13) 78.94%
Mar. 6, 2009: Boston Celtics (48-14) v. Cleveland Cavaliers (48-12) 78.68%
Apr. 12, 2009: Cleveland Cavaliers (64-15) v. Boston Celtics (60-19) 78.47%
Feb. 11, 1972: Boston Celtics (42-18) v. Los Angeles Lakers (49-7) 78.44%
Apr. 10, 1997: Chicago Bulls (67-10) v. New York Knicks (53-23) 78.42%
Mar. 28, 2006: Detroit Pistons (55-14) v. Dallas Mavericks (54-16) 78.41%
Mar. 18, 1997: Chicago Bulls (56-9) v. Seattle SuperSonics (45-19) 78.28%
Feb. 8, 2015: Memphis Grizzlies (37-13) v. Atlanta Hawks (42-9) 78.21%
Feb. 14, 1997: Chicago Bulls (43-6) v. Atlanta Hawks (32-15) 78.12%
Apr. 1, 2012: Oklahoma City Thunder (39-12) v. Chicago Bulls (42-11) 77.87%
Feb. 6, 1973: Los Angeles Lakers (43-11) v. New York Knicks (45-14) 77.87%
Mar. 9, 1973: Boston Celtics (57-13) v. Los Angeles Lakers (52-18) 77.85%
Apr. 3, 2009: Orlando Magic (55-19) v. Cleveland Cavaliers (61-14) 77.84%
Apr. 15, 2007: Dallas Mavericks (65-14) v. San Antonio Spurs (58-21) 77.84%
Mar. 31, 2013: Miami Heat (57-15) v. San Antonio Spurs (55-17) 77.77%
Mar. 16, 1983: Philadelphia 76ers (54-9) v. Boston Celtics (44-19) 77.77%
Feb. 17, 1991: Los Angeles Lakers (36-13) v. Portland Trail Blazers (41-9) 77.77%

Reduce the minimum of the range all the way to 30 combined games. Still only one game features a higher combined win percentage than Spurs-Warriors: Houston Rockets (18-1) vs. Seattle SuperSonics (16-1) in 1994.

The closest proximity is probably Bucks (35-8) vs. Lakers (39-3) in 1972. Milwaukee’s win snapped the Lakers’ 33-game winning streak.

It’s just rare for two teams on this level to meet so deep into the season – mostly because it’s rare for two teams to play at this level in the same season.

Not only are Golden State and San Antonio winning frequently, they’re winning big.

The Spurs are outscoring opponents by 14.5 points per game. The Warriors are +12.1 per game. That’d rank as the No. 1 and No. 7 marks of all time over a full season.

Here are the top 20 teams in point difference per game this far into a season, San Antonio in black and Golden State in blue:

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We’ve seen something like this only once before. Beside 2015-16, just one other season produced two teams in the top 20 of margin of victory per game.

In 1971-72, the Lakers (69-13, +13.9) and Bucks (63-19, +13.2) dominated the competition.

Like the Spurs and Warriors, they even shared a conference. Milwaukee was in the West back then. Los Angeles won four of five regular-season meetings then beat the Bucks in six games in the conference finals en route to the title.

Those Bucks – even with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Oscar Robertson and a championship the previous season – are probably still underrated. They just had the misfortune of playing the same time as a loaded Lakers team that featured Wilt Chamberlain and Jerry West.

There just hasn’t been anything like that simultaneous domination – until now.

For perspective, here are the top two teams in point difference per game this far into each season (No. 1 in black, No. 2 in blue):

image

However, there’s a big asterisk on the Warriors’ and Spurs success: They haven’t faced each other.

It’s much easier to dominate when not facing the league’s other elite teams. That’ll change soon.

This is the first of four meetings between Golden State and San Antonio. The Warriors still have all three of their games against the third-best Thunder left, and the Spurs also face Oklahoma City thrice more.

For both Golden State and San Antonio to maintain their high average margin of victory, they’ll have to beat up even more convincingly on other teams. After all, they can’t both dominate their four games with each other. They’ll likely pull each other down to the mean.

But perhaps one can keep its résumé so shiny. If so, will it be the Warriors or Spurs?

Someone will land the first blow in tonight’s historic matchup.

If you’re a Comcast subscriber in the Bay Area, you can stream tonight’s Warriors-Spurs game here.

Daryl Morey says Rockets should be favorites in West

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What else did you expect him to say?

Rockets GM Daryl Morey is both confident and a bit obsessive on the topic of bringing a title to Houston. So when Jonathan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle asked him if, with the Warriors taking a step back, the Rockets should be the favorite in the West, there was only one answer.

“Yes. We’re favorites. But as usual, there is some very tough competition: Clippers, Lakers, Utah. Then I’d say people are probably underrating Golden State still. We have a healthy respect for them. But we go in shooting for the No. 1 seed.”

That’s a lofty goal, but this is the bigger question to me: What matters more, a top seed or adding in load management so James Harden and Russell Westbrook (and Eric Gordon, Clint Capela, etc.) are rested and 100 percent (or as close as any players are at that point in the season) when the playoffs start? That’s not a simple yes/no answer, there’s a sliding scale of rest vs. need for a high seed, but the team needs to have a priority.

There are plenty of questions about the Rockets heading into the season: Can isolation masters Westbrook and Harden find an offensive balance? (My guess is they do, although it could take a little time.) Do they have enough depth? Can this team defend at a high level — an advance deep in the playoff level — with Harden and Westbrook on the court at the same time? (That’s the one to watch.)

Morey sees a team that has the advantage of continuity — even with all the changes, because Westbrook and Harden have known each other back to their high school days — and a team that will play a little faster.

“I think we have great continuity because I think we’re returning more minutes than most teams in the league, but also the familiarity of all the players. You get players of similar age like Russ and James and Eric in particular, they’ve known each other since they were very young. They’ve been battling on the court together, against and with each other for a long time….

“I think we’re going to get back to transition being more of a weapon for us. That was something Mike did very well his first year for us. Mostly because we were an elite halfcourt team, we got away from it. With a weapon like Russell in transition, you have to use it.”

The Rockets are going to be good this season. Very good. Favorites in the West good? That they are going to have to prove.

NBA owners wanted tampering crackdown, reportedly now concerned about privacy, effectiveness

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As we wrote when the details came out about owners pushing a crackdown on tampering around the NBA and increased fines, it’s one thing to talk tough and something else entirely to enforce those rules. The devil is always in the details.

This week NBA owners are descending upon New York for the annual preseason Board of Governors meetings, and they are wrestling with those devils, reports Adrian Wojnarowski and Zach Lowe of ESPN. Specifically, should the league be able to monitor a team’s communications with other teams and agents?

In conversations with numerous league officials, team owners, general managers and agents, there’s some uncertainty about the means the NBA might use to investigate alleged rules violations. Atop those concerns for team officials are what league sources insist was Commissioner Adam Silver toughest decision in bringing new rules to a vote: An annual, random auditing of five teams’ communications with rival front offices and player agents…

Pre-June 30 discussions between teams and agents would migrate away from text messages and emails if the league gets the right to audit five teams per year at random. That one clause will likely engender a lot of discussion today and Friday, league sources say. Teams are curious: what would an audit entail? How much access would the league get to the cell phones of GMs and governors? What happens if they go looking for tampering and find other information of interest — intel on players and coaches, financial plans, one off-color joke?…

“I don’t think he should have any right to get into my phone,” one GM told ESPN. “I wish my owner would vote no, but I doubt he will. You’ll only make yourself a target for investigation if you do.”

What the proposed new rules do is increase fines and say Silver has the right to take away draft picks if a team is caught tampering (a power he already has, but one teams fear more than fines), and add the audits. Those audits mean teams would have to keep texts and emails with agents for at least a year. Silver also wants teams to do a little self-policing — of themselves, to act more like partners in one big business. The goal is to build an NBA culture without much tampering. Good luck with that.

Silver is too politically savvy to bring this proposal forward if he didn’t have the votes lined up, something Wojnarowski and Lowe note. It’s going to get approved, something primarily driven by small and medium market teams who see themselves as just trying to level the playing field. (Even though plenty of them tamper, too.)

However, just like now, only teams to slow on figuring out how to cover their tracks will get caught.

There are plenty of means of communication with an agent, for example, that are not texts/emails and can easily disappear from existence (WhatsApp, for example, but teams may not even use that). There also is always simply using a human intermediary to deliver a message or ask a question, something that could not easily be traced. It’s not that difficult to cover your tracks electronically, either.

The other question out there: What will be the unintended consequences of this move? Any major policy decision — in basketball, in politics, in life — has consequences nobody saw coming at the time, this move will too. And small market owners will likely complain about that, too.

Team USA keeps top spot in FIBA men’s world rankings, Spain No. 2

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USA Basketball has kept its No. 1 spot in the FIBA world men’s rankings, even after a disappointing seventh-place showing in the World Cup that ended earlier this week.

It’s now nine-years-and-counting in the top spot for the U.S., which has held the No. 1 ranking since winning the 2010 world championship. World Cup champion Spain stayed No. 2, Australia leaped eight spots to No. 3, World Cup finalist Argentina rose one spot to No. 4 and World Cup bronze-medalist France fell two slots to No. 5.

FIBA’s rankings take results from the most recent eight years into account – which means the U.S. is still reaping point benefits from the 2012 and 2016 Olympic gold medals and the 2014 World Cup title.

“In this day and age, basketball in other countries is not a secret,” U.S. coach Gregg Popovich said after the Americans completed their run in the World Cup. “So it’s not like there’s an epiphany or a revelation to be made. There are wonderful teams and wonderful coaches all over the world. You go compete and the best teams win.”

It’s now expected that the U.S. will retain the No. 1 ranking going into the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Several top NBA players, including Stephen Curry, Draymond Green and Damian Lillard have said in recent days that they intend to play for the U.S. in Tokyo, where the Americans will try to win a fourth consecutive gold medal.

Most top U.S. players declined to be part of the World Cup team.

“I’m expecting them to be so strong next year,” Spain coach Sergio Scariolo said.

OLYMPIC UPDATE

The new rankings confirmed that European champion Slovenia, which didn’t earn a spot in the World Cup field after many of its top players couldn’t take part in qualifying since those games conflicted with the NBA and Euroleague schedules, will still have a chance to compete in the Olympics – as will seven other teams that found out they’re headed to playoffs next year.

Angola, Senegal, Mexico, Uruguay, China, Korea and Croatia also still have Olympic hopes. Those last eight playoff spots awarded Thursday went to the top two teams from Africa, Europe, Asia-Oceania and the Americas regions who hadn’t either already clinched Olympic berths or spots in the last-chance playoffs.

Japan is automatically qualified for the 12-team Olympic tournament as the host country. The U.S., Argentina, Nigeria, Spain, France, Iran and Australia clinched Olympic spots at the World Cup by finishing as the best teams in their respective FIBA regions – the Americas, Africa, Europe, Asia and Oceania.

That leaves four unclaimed Olympic berths, and 24 teams to compete for them in playoffs next year. There will be four six-team tournaments held from June 23-28, 2020 – winner-take-all, all in this case meaning an Olympic berth. Bidding for sites is expected to begin shortly, FIBA said.

The other 16 playoff spots were awarded based on World Cup placing. They went to Serbia, Lithuania, Greece, Russia, Brazil, Italy, Puerto Rico, Turkey, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Germany, Canada, the Czech Republic, Poland, New Zealand and Tunisia.

MOVING UP

Belize was the top mover in the new rankings, climbing 50 spots to No. 118. Kosovo rose 21 spots to No. 69, Togo went up 21 spots to No. 136, Tunisia climbed 18 spots to No. 33 and Ivory Coast went up 16 spots to No. 48.

STILL SWEEPING

FIBA has four sets of rankings – for men, women, boys and girls. The U.S. holds the No. 1 spot in all four of those rankings, though the race is tightest among the men.

The U.S. men hold a lead of 54.9 points over Spain in those rankings, while the rankings margins held by the U.S. women (310 points over No. 2 Spain), boys (291 points over No. 2 Canada) and girls (155 points over No. 2 Spain) are far more comfortable.

Report: NBA won’t allow Rockets to use Nene’s contract as $10M trade chip

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Update: Shams Charania of The Athletic:

This is a huge blow to Houston. The Rockets are now stuck with an over-the-hill center they can’t trade for value and can’t play much without triggering bonuses that’ll make him way overpaid.

If they had known how this would turn out, they would’ve signed Nene to a one-year minimum contract at most. At least that’d be partially subsidized by the league. Because this is is a two-year deal, Houston is on the hook for the full base salary.

 

 

The Rockets got a valuable trade chip with Nene’s contract.

At least if the deal goes through.

Bobby Marks of ESPN:

Although Nene signed with the Houston Rockets on Sept. 6, the NBA has yet to officially approve the deal. The 10-day delay is a result of the NBA discussing internally whether it should disapprove details in the contract, according to multiple sources.

Nene’s contract includes a low base salary with a massive amount of likely incentives. Houston could count Nene’s full $10 million salary (base plus likely incentives) in a trade. The acquiring team would then owe Nene his base salary plus only the bonuses he actually triggers.

It’s a workaround to the typical salary-matching rules.

The bonuses are tied to individual games played and team games won. Because Nene played 42 games for the 53-win Rockets last season, the bonuses are qualified as likely. Last year’s performance is the default way to determine whether incentives are likely or unlikely.

You can read more about the contract’s structure here.

The NBA’s apprehension is interesting. The Collective Bargaining Agreement specifies a procedure for challenging incentive classification when the league or union believes the prior season is not a fair predictor. Essentially, that side makes a case to an arbiter that the default assumption is “very likely” to be wrong.

However, in a funny quirk here, that challenge system lays out only how the NBA can challenge to turn unlikely incentives into likely incentives and how the union can challenge to turn likely incentives into unlikely incentives. There’s nothing about the NBA turning likely incentives into unlikely incentives, which the league is apparently considering here (and would make Nene’s contract invalid, as there’s a limit on unlikely incentives).

The CBA also prohibits circumventing the spirit of the rules. The league could rule Houston did that here. However, that’s a tough case considering not only does Nene’s contract meet all stated technicalities, there’s a section specifically on challenging these types of details. It just doesn’t apply.

The Heat opened the door for likely/unlikely-incentive shenanigans a couple years ago. We didn’t hear then about the NBA challenging those contracts, and that’s where the official challenge system would’ve applied.

It seems unfair to punish the Rockets’ creativity now.