Report: Blake Griffin initially told DeAndre Jordan to honor commitment to Mavericks

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We know the gist of the story.

DeAndre Jordan had second thoughts about signing the Mavericks, so he met with the Clippers again. They stayed at his house – including Blake Griffin sending hilarious tweets – until Jordan officially re-signed.

But it might not have played out that way if Griffin’s first message to Jordan landed.

Ramona Shelburne and Tim MacMahon of ESPN:

Jordan had called Griffin on Monday to say he was having serious misgivings about his decision. He had built a life in Los Angeles. Why was he leaving? Had he just gotten caught up in the frenzy of the recruiting process? Did he really want to be the face of a franchise? Griffin told Jordan he had made a commitment and needed to live up to it. They’d still be friends, regardless of whether they were teammates. But Jordan seemed troubled. Griffin told him he needed to call Rivers if he really wanted to revisit his decision.

I bet Griffin is sure glad he added the part about calling Doc Rivers. If Jordan had just listened to Griffin’s advice about honoring his commitment, the Clippers wouldn’t be title contenders.

That excerpt is part of a fantastically detailed account of Jordan’s free agency. I suggest you read it in full.

Another interesting portion covers Jordan partying with Mavericks forward Chandler Parsons in June – when the NBA permits players, but not team executives and owners, to recruit pending free agents.

Shelburne and MacMahon:

The night started with dinner at Boa on the Sunset Strip and ended across the street at a swanky club called Bootsy Bellows, where Cuban just happened to be entertaining a group of associates from his TV show, “Shark Tank.” With Cuban across the club, Jordan, Parsons and Matthews sipped on drinks and discussed the possibility of playing together in Dallas.

I suppose it’s possible Mark Cuban being at the same restaurant was pure coincidence. And I suppose it’s possible he didn’t say a word to Jordan while they were there.

But anyone using circumstantial evidence to complain about the Clippers violating unofficial decorum should also ask whether circumstantial evidence says Cuban violated official tampering rules.