How will Cavaliers score now when LeBron James rests?

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The Cavaliers scored just six points on 12 possessions – an offensive rating of 50.0 – when LeBron James rested during Game 1 of the NBA Finals.

And that was with Kyrie Irving.

Irving played all seven LeBron sat, scoring four of Cleveland’s six points and assisting the other basket. As you might have heard, Irving is out for the rest of the series.

What will the Cavaliers do now when LeBron is on the bench?

Um…

Well…

You see…

Let’s start with reviewing what happened in Game 1.

Here are Cleveland’s three buckets without LeBron, two by Irving and one by Timofey Mozgov from Irving:

Otherwise, the possessions featured nine missed shots, no offensive rebounds, no trips to the free-throw line and no turnovers. Only one of those nine shots – a missed Mozgov layup – came within 15 feet. The Cavaliers just stagnated and settled for jumpers.

Irving generated the only looks Cleveland got going toward the basket without LeBron.

This possession, in which Irving didn’t touch the ball, could preview what we’ll see in Game 2:

So what should the Cavaliers do with LeBron off the court?

The simplest answer if for him never to rest. Can LeBron play 48 minutes per game? He might have to do it only three more nights.

If that proves unrealistic, Cleveland shouldn’t settle for running its base offense through Matthew Dellavedova or Iman Shumpert. That’s unlikely to yield positive enough results.

Potential solutions:

  • Maximize LeBron’s minutes. In basic terms, it’s up to LeBron to determine how much he can handle. But David Blatt could help by intentionally fouling Andre Iguodala and/or Andrew Bogut. Iguodala (59.6 percent free-throwing shooting this season, 71.7 percent for his career) and Bogut (52.4, 56.1) probably aren’t bad enough free-throw shooters to validate the strategy in a vacuum, but there are benefits. It could keep LeBron on the court while resting during defensive possessions spent watching the Warriors shoot freebies. Hack-a-Shaq limits running opportunities, but the Cavaliers don’t push the ball much, anyway.
  • Focus on defense. If the Cavaliers aren’t going to score anyway, they might as well do their best to ensure the Warriors score as little as possible while LeBron rests. Maybe that means a rotation role for Shawn Marion.
  • Slow the pace. If the Cavs bleed the shot clock while LeBron sits – something they naturally did in Game 1, anyway – they can limit the number of possessions LeBron misses. That gives Golden State fewer opportunities to use this time to pull away.
  • Bomb 3-pointers. Cleveland can become a true live-by-the-3, die-by-the-3 team. Let J.R. Smith run wild. If you’re going to take a bad shot, might as well take one worth an extra point if it goes in.
  • Crash the offensive glass. The Cavaliers’ deadly offensive-rebounding combination, Mozgov and Tristan Thompson, didn’t share the court without LeBron in Game 1. But Cleveland could turn to the duo in Game 2. There will likely be plenty of offensive-rebounding opportunities. However, crashing the offensive glass would run counter to getting back on defense. Plus, the Warriors’ defensive game plan against LeBron is more conducive to offensive-rebounding than Golden State’s tamer defense when he sits.

Without Irving, the Cavaliers need to increase variance, period.

Those seemingly doomed minutes with LeBron on the bench would be a great place to start.

DeAndre Jordan joins Mavericks, treats touchy history with humor

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DALLAS (AP) — DeAndre Jordan took off his warmup jacket, tossed it aside and declared that his decision to join the Dallas Mavericks didn’t mean he also would be playing for his favorite NFL team, the Dallas Cowboys.

Humor was the center’s way of easing into all the questions about his infamous jilting of the Mavericks in free agency three years ago, when he agreed to play for Dallas and changed his mind before contracts could be signed.

When it was pointed out to him that folks in Dallas hadn’t seen the fun-loving side of the native Texan before Mavericks media day Friday, Jordan did what he had done for most of his 15 minutes with reporters. He smiled.

“You haven’t seen this side?” Jordan asked, repeating the observation. “You guys hated me the past three years so I probably wasn’t very open in interviews. You know what I mean? I’m excited to get to know all of you guys.”

Jordan wanted to get one thing straight before agreeing again to sign with the Mavericks, this time after opting out of the final year of that four-year contract he signed with the Los Angeles Clippers in the summer of 2015. He wanted to make sure coach Rick Carlisle and Dirk Nowitzki, among others, didn’t have any hard feelings.

Well, Jordan was pretty sure he was cool with the 40-year-old German superstar who is about to set an NBA record by spending all 21 of his seasons with the same franchise.

“Dirk is an old man so he forgets a lot of stuff,” Jordan said, sending a wave of laughter through the interview room. “Like I said at the beginning, before I committed again I just wanted to make sure that we were OK and everything was positive. They said they forgot about all that and they were looking forward to the future.”

It wasn’t necessarily forgotten for Nowitzki, who started at center the past couple of years and likely won’t have a regular spot in the starting lineup for the first time since his rookie season of 1998-99. But it was definitely forgiven – long before Jordan actually followed follow through on his plan to be Nowitzki’s teammate.

“We’ve been over that a long, long time ago,” Nowitzki said. “It wasn’t only about basketball. He made some other decisions about what was best for him. We’re in no position to judge anybody. Everybody in a free agent situation has to make a decision that’s best for himself first. And that’s what he did.”

Besides, Nowitzki gets to see that other side of Jordan now, too.

“He’s got a crazy personality,” Nowitzki said. “He’s fun to be around. He enjoys life and he’ll be a great addition to our team. That’s off the court. I think on the court he’s going to be pretty great, some of the defensive stuff he’s going to wipe out.”

Jordan is one of the NBA’s best rebounders, finishing in the top three each of the past five seasons. Although his shot-blocking numbers have dropped off the past two seasons, the 30-year-old is still considered one of the best rim protectors.

Those are a couple of reasons Carlisle didn’t even have to forgive the 6-foot-11 Jordan when the exploratory phone call came.

“I said, `Hey, I’ve been waiting for this phone call for three years. You kidding me?”‘ Carlisle said. “And so we’re thrilled to have him here. Our guys love him. And he’s going to be a big asset for us.”

Harrison Barnes was a defending NBA champion with Golden State when Jordan jilted the Mavericks. But the team’s leading scorer the past two seasons still got caught up in the story a year later through a photo that was tweeted when Barnes signed the Mavericks immediately after the moratorium ended.

In it, Barnes is handcuffed to president of basketball operations Donnie Nelson, standing alongside Carlisle and Nelson’s top assistant, former player Michael Finley. All four of them are smiling, and yes, Barnes played along.

It was a final nod to the emoji-driven drama that included Blake Griffin and Clippers coach Doc Rivers holing up with Jordan in his Houston home while Mavericks owner Mark Cuban tried to contact the former Texas A&M standout. Griffin and Rivers didn’t leave until Jordan had signed.

“I never thought all of us would be on the same team this many years later,” Barnes said. “I was like, `That is nuts.’ It was crazy, but everything happens for a reason.”

The Mavericks have been telling themselves that a lot, through their first consecutive losing records in nearly 20 years after yet another first-round playoff exit the season after Jordan stayed in LA.

Dallas hasn’t won a postseason series since winning its only championship in 2011. But with Jordan joining a pair of top-10 draft picks in Dennis Smith Jr. and rookie Luka Doncic, the Mavericks believe the franchise’s fortunes may finally be turning.

Jordan is hopeful fans who booed him incessantly all five times he came to Dallas after the decision will come around as well.

“I don’t think I would have changed what happened,” Jordan said. “I think I would have changed the way that it was handled. Because I don’t regret my decision staying with the Clippers. I’m excited about this new chapter. I don’t really think about it as much as I used to when I was younger anymore.”

 

Report: Jimmy Butler to miss Minnesota media day, not participate on court to start camp

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Welcome to the latest escalation of in an ugly situation for the Timberwolves. Or, if you prefer, the dumpster fire in Minnesota just got a little hotter.

What had been reported as something that could happen — Jimmy Butler missing the start of training camp — has come to reality. Butler has been given permission to miss media day and will not participate on the court to start camp, reports Jon Krawczynski and Shams Charania of The Athletic.

Skipping media day is an effort to make that less of a circus… good luck with that.

Not participating to start the camp is Butler’s way of exerting pressure and trying to get traded sooner rather than later.

In a meeting last Tuesday in Los Angeles, Butler asked for a tradespecifically to the Clippers/Nets/Knicks. That started a week where things devolved quickly in Minnesota, including social media drama with Andrew Wiggins and rumors about Towns’ girlfriend being at the heart of the problem. And those are just the side shows.

Thibodeau has forcefully shot down any other team that even tried to start a trade discussion, and would rather quit than move Butler for a rebuilding package of picks. Part of that is good negotiation tactics, right now offers are not going to be that good, however, the other part of it is Thibodeau realizes his job on the line and this team is not as good without Butler.

With Thibodeau wanting no part of trading Butler, Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor — who has a rocky relationship with Thibodeau — is fielding trade offers and is taking charge of the situation, a bad sign for Thibodeau.

Looming over all of this is the future of the franchise — Karl-Anthony Towns has a $158 million contract extension sitting on the table, but told management he can’t coexist with Butler and reportedly will not sign the new deal until the Butler situation is resolved.

Sources around the league think Butler will get moved, but the demand for him is not as strong as the Timberwolves would hope (and ideally Minnesota would like to dump Gorgui Dieng and his contract in the deal). Teams that want him believe they can get him as a free agent and are not offering much, while others will not throw in much for a potential rental. Beyond that, teams are worried that if they sign or re-sign Butler next summer to a max contract (the team with his Bird rights can offer five-years, $190 million, others can offer four years at $139 million) they will regret the finals year or two of the contract, because while Butler is just 29 he has Thibodeau miles on him and has battled some injuries, including last season.

This drama is far from over, though if ownership is pushing to get this dealt with sooner rather than later it will.

Adam Silver defends penalty to Cuban for Mavericks’ misconduct

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NEW YORK (AP) — NBA Commissioner Adam Silver says he didn’t suspend Mark Cuban because the Mavericks owner was never directly implicated in the misconduct toward women within his organization.

Silver acknowledged Friday that Cuban should have been more aware of what was going on, but felt a suspension wasn’t warranted being that Cuban wasn’t accused of anything by any of the more than 200 people interviewed in a report into the team’s workplace that was released this week.

Silver also cited Cuban’s response to the original “Sports Illustrated” report detailing years of examples of a hostile workplace for women on the business side of the team, and the organization’s cooperation with investigators afterward in choosing not to hand down further punishment.

Cuban agreed to contribute $10 million to help further the cause of women in sports and raise awareness about domestic violence. Silver could have only fined him $2.5 million under NBA rules.

 

Kings’ Bogdan Bogdanovic tweaks knee in FIBA qualifying, to have surgery

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This is why NBA teams don’t love it when their players go off to the national team over the summer.

Sacramento’s Bogdan Bogdanovic tweaked his knee playing for Serbia Monday, and now is going to have to have surgery on his left knee. It’s described as minor, but it’s still surgery. Here is the Kings’ release:

Sacramento Kings guard Bogdan Bogdanovic exited Serbia’s 91-65 World Cup Qualifying victory over Estonia on Monday after experiencing left knee discomfort early in the first quarter. Further evaluation revealed a minor injury to his left knee. On Monday, a minor arthroscopic procedure is scheduled at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, to be performed by Dr. Riley Williams. Bogdanovic is expected to make a full recovery and an update will be provided when it is available.

Bogdanovic had surgery on this same knee just after the season, and while this is considered less serious it’s still something to watch. Don’t expect to see him on the court preseason. The Kings have media day Monday and open training camp on Tuesday.

Bogdanovic, a 6’6″ sharp-shooting wing, averaged 11.8 points a game and shot 39.2 percent from three last season, making second-team All-Rookie.