Billy Donovan’s blueprint to success in Oklahoma City laid out by Steve Kerr in Bay Area

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It’s a big gamble: Replace a coach the players like and respect, then tell the new guy to modernize the team’s offense, and turn team into a contender in his first season on an NBA bench.

It’s exactly what is being asked of Billy Donovan in Oklahoma City, where he was hired on Thursday after 19 years as the coach of Florida.

It’s also what was asked of Steve Kerr this past season in Golden State — and he had Jay-Z level success. The Warriors made the leap under Kerr, winning 67 regular season games (in a crazy deep Western Conference) and becoming title favorites.

Kerr has laid out a blueprint that Donovan can follow this summer and into next season to bring the same success to the Midwest. Donovan has been handed the keys to a Ferrari — healthy this team is a serious title contender — but crash the car and Kevin Durant likely bolts next summer in free agency. Then Russell Westbrook follows him a year later.

No pressure.

We need to start here: This hire was not some massive reach by Thunder GM Sam Presti. He was not pulling a coach from obscurity — this is a guy a number of NBA teams have eyed for years (including the Magic, who thought they had him as their coach until Donovan backed out last minute years ago). Donovan’s former players such as Bradley Beal, Al Horford, Corey Brewer, and Joakim Noah sang his praises and have said they know he can succeed at the next level.

“Billy Donovan is a fantastic coach, and one that probably doesn’t get enough credit for just how good he is,” Rob Dauster, the main man at our sister site CollegeBasketballTalk, told PBT. “Everyone knows about the back-to-back national titles that he won, but I’d argue that the best coaching performance of his collegiate career came back in the 2013-14 season. Florida went 36-3 that season, running roughshod over the SEC and reaching the Final Four with a roster that didn’t feature one NBA player on it.”

The first step in the Steve Kerr blueprint: Hire top-flight NBA assistants.

Get guys with experience, guys whose strengths are Donovan’s weaknesses. Kerr and the Warriors opened the checkbook to poach Alvin Gentry away from Doc Rivers and the Clippers — he was the best offensive mind among the assistant coaches out there. Donovan needs some guys who can show him where the potholes are, who can ease his transition to the next level.

Next step: Meet with the players on the roster during the summer and start to form a relationship.

Donovan may have left college, but he is still recruiting (primarily keeping Durant in OKC). Donovan can’t win his new players all the way over in one meeting, but he can start to build the foundation he will need come the season. Of course, sit down with Durant and Westbrook first. But Kerr flew to Australia to meet with Andrew Bogut and took the time to get to know everyone on the roster. Donovan needs to meet with everyone – and when he does he needs to have a vision and a plan. Kerr was specific, for example he told Harrison Barnes he wanted him to work off the ball more not be the sixth man asked to create for everyone (something Barnes welcomed with open arms). Donovan can’t walk in and make vague promises — he must tell his players exactly how he wants to use them and why this will be good for them and the team.

Third step: modernize the offense.

This is one of the things Presti wanted most of all, what he thought was holding back the Thunder was Brooks’ conventional offense. It was predictable and too often devolved into a Durant or Westbrook isolation (which worked because they are Durant and Westbrook but was not ideal). Presti wants an offense more like we have seen in San Antonio and Golden State.

“The thing that makes him so appealing from an NBA perspective is that his coaching style will fit in well at the professional level,” CollegeBasketballTalk’s Dauster said. “At Florida, he ran a ball-screen motion offense built around floor-spacing, which are offensive concepts that are quite prevalent in the NBA. Not all college coaches will fit in well at the professional level. Donovan will.”

Final step: Keep working toward the big picture.

The finish line is not when the season tips off, even though it’s going to take a lot of work to get there. A hot November is great but can be fool’s gold. Be committed to the process, be open to the suggestions of his assistant coaches and players, tweak things as needed, but always stay focused on the goal of being a team hitting its stride as the playoffs start.

Do all that, and he’ll still need some breaks to go his way — that is life in the NBA. Health is at the top of his wish list.

Do all that and he’ll have a chance to win big — and with that keep Durant in Oklahoma City in 2016.

Which is the real reason he was hired.

Report: Rockets tried to give away Chris Paul, but teams – including Knicks – said no

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Rockets general manager Daryl Morey not only denied a report that Chris Paul demanded a trade, Morey said Paul would remain in Houston next season.

We might never know how tense the situation has gotten between Paul and James Harden. We might never know whether Paul requested a trade.

But we will know whether Paul begins next season in Houston.

Morey’s credibility is on the line with that. Will he really refuse to trade Paul? That’s not Morey’s style.

More likely, Morey made that declaration only after exhausting the market for Paul and the three years, $124,076,442 remaining on his contract.

Shams Charania of The Athletic, via CBS:

There’s not a team in the league right now that is like, “I’m going to go trade for Chris Paul.” Even some teams that they’ve called, I’m told, as just a dump, like, “We’ll give you Chris Paul for free,” those teams are like “We’re good.” So, the value just is not there right now.

Kevin O’Connor of The Ringer:

The Rockets recently explored trading Chris Paul into New York’s cap space, but the Knicks refused, according to league sources.

Good for the Knicks resisting. With Kyrie Irving apparently (maybe?) headed to the Nets and Kevin Durant‘s future up in the air, that’s the type of desperate move New York is known to make.

Paul, 34, is overpaid and declining. No team should absorb his contract into cap space.

But he’s still pretty good. Not nearly as good as he once was, but good enough to help the Rockets. Their championship window hasn’t necessarily snapped completely shut yet. There’s value in keeping Paul and trying to repair his and Harden’s relationship.

There also might be better opportunities later in the summer to trade Paul. Teams want to preserve their cap space now for free agents. But some teams will strike out and might view Paul as a good fallback option.

Of course, if Morey thought a deal later in the offseason were a possibility, he probably wouldn’t have so explicitly insisted Paul will remain in Houston.

Report: Minnesota “aggressive” in trying to trade up in draft, talked to Pelicans about fourth pick

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The Minnesota Timberwolves are slotted to pick 11th in the NBA Draft Thursday night. There they could land players along the lines of Brandon Clarke or Rui Hachimura, both of Gonzaga.

The Timberwolves have their sights set higher and they are looking to move up in the draft — maybe all the way to No. 4, reports Marc Stein of The New York Times.

Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic fleshed out some details.

Among the options being considered, as first reported by ESPN, is moving all the way up to No. 4, presumably for a shot at Vanderbilt point guard Darius Garland. He missed most of his lone season in college due to a knee injury, but prior to that was widely scouted as the top point guard in the draft class. Interest in such a move is indicative of Rosas’s mindset of star-chasing, an approach honed in Houston.

That sounds great in theory, but what is the deal to be made for the fourth pick? David Griffin of the Pelicans has made it clear the No. 4 pick is available, but they want a veteran — and one not too old — in return. The Timberwolves don’t have that guy on their roster. (Technically they do in Andrew Wiggins, but that’s not a contract — four years, $122.3 million remaining — that the Pelicans would take on.)

Minnesota’s head of basketball operations Gersson Rosas told The Athletic how hard this kind of trade can be.

“The reality is, and history will tell you, it’s hard to trade up into the top three of the draft, even top five in the lottery,” Rosas said. “It’s very difficult. We know, because we’re tried, and will continue to try. But that price, the premium that teams charge for that is at a high level in any draft in any year.”

Minnesota seems a long shot, but don’t be surprised if the Pelicans trade the No. 4 pick. New Orleans has worked hard to find someone to take that pick off their hands, so long as they get a fair price back.

Report: Nets debating whether or not to sign Kyrie Irving without Kevin Durant

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The Nets want to sign Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving.

Brooklyn appears set to get Irving. Durant a much bigger unknown.

Brian Lewis of the New York Post:

The question is if they can’t land Durant, do they still want Irving?

It also has become an internal debate the Nets are having right now.

The Post has confirmed Brooklyn might have qualms about signing the enigmatic Irving if he isn’t bringing the injured Durant with him.

Irving brings chemistry concerns, to be sure. He’s mercurial, and his season with the Celtics raises legitimate questions about him leading a team.

But Irving is a major talent upgrade. To win at the highest levels, teams must assemble a lot of talent and hope for the best.

I’d also caution Brooklyn against assuming re-signing D'Angelo Russell would mean the team maintains its current culture. The Nets can’t freeze time. Situations change. People change. There’s no guarantee Russell on a lucrative contract and his teammates jell as well as contract-year Russell and his teammates did.

Keeping Russell might look like the safe route, but nothing is assured.

The other huge issue: Durant might not know where he’ll sign when Irving is ready to commit. The Nets could have to decide on Irving before knowing whether Durant will accompany him. At that point, would Brooklyn really spurn Irving and a chance at getting both stars? I can’t see that.

Really, with so much talk of Irving joining the Nets, I thought we’d already crossed that threshold.

Report: Bucks trading Tony Snell, No. 30 pick to Pistons

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For a team only lukewarm on paying the luxury tax, the Bucks are in a payroll crunch. Khris Middleton, Brook Lopez, Malcolm Brogdon and Nikola Mirotic will be free agents this summer.

That’s why Milwaukee was trying to unload Tony Snell or Ersan Ilyasova.

But if they re-sign their key free agents to multi-year deals, the Bucks could face more payroll/tax concerns in 2020-21.

That’s why Milwaukee is willing to deal Snell and its first-round pick for Jon Leuer‘s burdensome contract – which carries a slightly lower salary than Snell’s next season ($9,508,043 vs. $11,592,857) and, more importantly, ends one year before Snell’s ($12,378,571 player option for 2020-21),

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

This trade lowers Milwaukee’s team salary by about $4 million next season and $14 million the following season.

The Bucks could stretch Leuer and reduce team salary by an extra $6,338,695 next season. But that’d also lock in a cap hit of $3,169,348 each of the next three years.

Milwaukee can make that decision later in the summer. It’ll depend what other free agents – especially Lopez, who has only Non-Bird Rights (technically a form of Bird Rights – command. Clearing extra money this offseason could be useful in multiple scenarios.

If Lopez signs for the non-taxpayer mid-level exception (which projects to start at about $9 million), the Bucks could maintain Bird Rights for Middleton, Brogdon and Mirotic then exceed the cap to re-sign those three. But Milwaukee would be hard-capped at a projected $138 million. Stretching Leuer could help the Bucks stay under that line.

If re-signing Lopez requires more than the mid-level exception, Milwaukee could open about $14 million in cap space by waiving George Hill and renouncing all its free agents besides Middleton and Brogdon. Stretching Leuer would open even more cap room to spend on Lopez.

If Lopez leaves, the same math applies to an outside free agent who could get the mid-level exception or cap room.

This extra maneuverability comes at a cost, though a reasonable one.

Snell, who fell from the Bucks’ rotation, could be the Pistons’ starting small forward next season. Detroit was desperate for wing depth. Though Snell isn’t the biggest wing, he adds size to a group comprised of Luke Kennard, Bruce Brown and Langston Galloway.

The No. 30 pick is a helpful piece to the Pistons, who also have the No. 15 pick in tomorrow’s draft. But this is a weak-looking draft that thins considerably before the end of the first round.

Milwaukee also had to take Leuer, who has been ineffective for years.

Detroit gets helps now with Snell and potentially later with the No. 30 pick. In between, that extra year of Snell’s contract looks burdensome.

The Bucks are just happy to have it not be theirs.