PBT Awards: All-Rookie team

23 Comments

Though none of us have a ballot for the NBA’s official awards, we’ll be presenting our choices and making our cases this week for each major honor.

Kurt Helin

First team

  • Elfrid Payton, Orlando Magic
  • Jordan Clarkson, Los Angeles Lakers
  • Andrew Wiggins, Minnesota Timberwolves
  • Nikola Mirotic, Chicago Bulls
  • Nerlens Noel, Philadelphia 76ers

Second Team

  • Marcus Smart, Boston Celtics
  • Zach LaVine, Minnesota Timberwolves
  • Bojan Bogdanovic, Brooklyn Nets
  • K.J. McDaniels, Houston Rockets
  • Jusuf Nurkic, Denver Nuggets

If you’re asking why Clarkson on the first team instead of Smart, look at the numbers. Clarkson has a higher true shooting percentage (.528 to .492) while using a higher percentage of the offense. Clarkson turns the ball over a lower percentage of possessions, hits his free throws, and looks like a future starter. Smart is the better defender (by a lot) and shoots the three ball a little better, but I like Clarkson as a future NBA starting point guard.

Brett Pollakoff

First team

  • Andrew Wiggins, Minnesota Timberwolves
  • Nikola Mirotic, Chicago Bulls
  • Nerlens Noel, Philadelphia 76ers
  • Elfrid Payton, Orlando Magic
  • Jordan Clarkson, Los Angeles Lakers

Second team

  • Jusuf Nurkic, Denver Nuggets
  • Tarik Black, Los Angeles Lakers
  • Marcus Smart, Boston Celtics
  • Bojan Bogdanovic, Brooklyn Nets
  • Zach LaVine, Minnesota Timberwolves

The first four names on the first team seem like fairly obvious choices, but then it gets murky pretty fast. Clarkson makes it based on being second among all rookies in PER — and because none of the second-team guys had a compelling enough season in total to take his spot.

Sean Highkin

First team

  • Andrew Wiggins, Minnesota Timberwolves
  • Elfrid Payton, Orlando Magic
  • Nikola Mirotic, Chicago Bulls
  • Nerlens Noel, Philadelphia 76ers
  • Marcus Smart, Boson Celtics

Second team

  • Jordan Clarkson, Los Angeles Lakers
  • Jusuf Nurkic, Denver Nuggets
  • Zach LaVine, Minnesota Timberwolves
  • K.J. McDaniels, Houston Rockets
  • Bojan Bogdanovic, Brooklyn Nets

Wiggins is going to run away with Rookie of the Year, and he deserves it. Other than him, three rookies set themselves apart by showing star potential: Mirotic, Noel and Payton. Smart would be in their category if he hadn’t missed so much time, but he still gets the nod for his tremendous defensive potential and better-than-expected shooting, playing a major role on a surprise playoff team.

There’s not a very high bar to clear to make second-team All-Rookie — you basically have to stay healthy and not be a complete embarrassment. Clarkson was the only bright spot for the worst Lakers season ever. We still don’t know what position LaVine is, but he won the dunk contest, so that’s cool. Nurkic is a legitimate piece for the Nuggets. McDaniels has barely played in Houston, but he was fun in Philadelphia. Bogdanovic slipped in the second half of the season, but his hot first half is enough to get him on here.

Dan Feldman

First team

  • Nikola Mirotic, Chicago Bulls
  • Andrew Wiggins, Minnesota Timberwolves
  • Elfrid Payton, Orlando Magic
  • Nerlens Noel, Philadelphia 76ers
  • Marcus Smart, Boston Celtics

Second team

  • Jordan Clarkson, Los Angeles Lakers
  • Jusuf Nurkic, Denver Nuggets
  • Bojan Bogdanovic, Brooklyn Nets
  • Rodney Hood, Utah Jazz
  • Tarik Black, Los Angeles Lakers

The top four players on my first team were easy calls. The last spot came down to Smart and Clarkson, and I really could go either way. Smart’s defense gave him the slight edge. Clarkson filled in admirably as a starting point guard, because the Lakers needed one. Smart would have provided impactful defense in any situation.

After Clarkson, the second team was difficult to fill out. Finding 10 players deserving of All-Rookie, rarely an easy task, was especially challenging this year, when so many key rookies spent only a partial season playing. How do you rate the many candidates who were only a tick above replacement level but played two to three times as much as Jabari Parker, who was much better when healthy but played just 25 games? Yeah, it was that kind of season where a 25-game-playing Jabari Parker got serious consideration.

Patrick Ewing on Knicks firing David Fizdale: “Very disappointed in that”

George Walker/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
1 Comment

Knicks legend Patrick Ewing currently is waist deep… well, at his height maybe knee deep, in the college basketball season. His Georgetown team is off to a solid 6-3 start with a game at Syracuse coming up this Saturday.

He still has time for his SiriusXM radio show, “Center Court with Patrick Ewing,” where he said he was “very disappointed” to see David Fizdale let go.

“Very disappointed in that. I think that Fiz is an outstanding coach. I’ve had an opportunity to get to know him over the years, met him when he was working for the Hawks. And just want to let him know that I support him and I know he’s looking forward to his next opportunity, but he is a very good coach and I was disappointed to see him getting let go.”

Coaches back the other coaches, it’s a fraternity that way. Rick Carlise is the master of it.

Fizdale is not blameless for the current state of the Knicks, his rotations and ability to develop young players certainly are in question, but he wasn’t the root of the problem. The best analogy I can come up with is Fizdale was the first contestant sent home on “Chopped”: Nobody was going to make a delicious meal out of the horribly mismatched ingredients in that basket, but the chef still has to do something cohesive with it. Fizdale did not.

The question becomes, is team president Steve Mills — the long-time Knicks employee who has known how to survive in James Dolan’s world — going to finally be let go and a big name brought in, or are the Knicks just rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic.

Pacers fans still boo Paul George, he responds with 34 through three quarters (VIDEO)

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Don’t make Paul George angry. You wouldn’t like him when he’s angry (if you’re the opposing team).

It was a couple of seasons ago, but the wounds of Paul George forcing his way out of Indiana are still fresh for Pacers fans, so they booed him when he handed the ball at points during the Clippers visit to Indiana.

George’s response? Go get buckets and tell the crowd to “shhh.”

Like 21 points in the first half buckets.

And 34 points after three quarters, with seven from beyond the arc.

The Clippers — without Kawhi Leonard on the back-to-back — were up double digits in the fourth quarter in Indiana. George will be your player of the game for L.A.

Kevin Love on latest rumors Cleveland will trade him: ‘Nothing’s changed’

Mitchell Leff/Getty Images
3 Comments

Kevin Love has heard it all before.

Rumors floated around Cleveland was going to trade Love in the summer of 2015 after his first season with the team. They sprung up again the next season at the trade deadline — before Love played a central role in Cleveland winning a ring. The rumors kept springing up, especially after LeBron James left. Then this past summer, Love signed a four-year, $120 million extension to stay in Cleveland.

That has not stopped the rumors.

Love was asked about the rumors and sounded unmoved by them but a little frustrated, via Tim Bontemps of ESPN.

“Nothing’s changed,” Love told ESPN after Cleveland’s morning shootaround at TD Garden. “What I mean by that is, since I got here they’ve been … since I f—ing got here, there’s been talk of me being traded, so it’s nothing different. If they decide to go that way, I’ve just got to know it’s part of the business, or if we decide to go that way, it’s part of the business.

“Truthfully, I don’t know how it’s going to play out, because I see both sides.”

This time it feels like Love could get moved, if not at the trade deadline then this summer — and he wants to go to a contender.

The logic is simple: Cleveland is rebuilding, Love is still a stretch four and good rebounder who can help a playoff team. Love is averaging 16.1 points and 10.5 rebounds a game, is shooting 37.1 percent from three, and remains one of the best outlet passers in the game. Boston, Denver, Portland and a host of other teams could use him this season.

The challenge is that massive contract, which is why a trade may be put off until next summer.

Whatever happens, Love isn’t going to stress over it.

It’s official: Gordon Hayward makes return to Celtics lineup Monday

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images
2 Comments

He beat the timeline by a full two weeks.

Gordon Hayward fractured his hand on a fluke play against the Spurs that required surgery to repair (he fractured the fourth metacarpal, the bone that connects the wrist to the ring finger). When he had surgery on Nov. 11, the timeline for a return was 6-8 weeks.

One month later, Hayward has been cleared to make his return Monday night against Cleveland.

This is good news for Boston and its offense. Hayward was having a bounce-back year through his first eight games, averaging 18.9 points per game, shooting 43.3 percent from three, pulling down 7.1 rebounds, and dishing out 4.1 assists per game. Even more than Kemba Walker, it was Hayward who was the playmaker for others and kept the offense flowing.

Not that Boston struggled too much with Hayward out. The Celtics went 9-4 with a +5.9 net rating in the games he missed, although the team’s offense slid back to middle-of-the-pack without his scoring and shot creation.

He’s back, and Boston — the second best team in the East so far this young season — just got a little better.