Lakers coach Byron Scott: I don’t believe in analytics

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When Charles Barkley claimed four or five NBA coaches called him to agree with his stance on analytics, Lakers coach Byron Scott was one of the – if not the – most-guessed.

Scott didn’t confirm he called Barkley, but he certainly indicated he had the mindset to do so.

Bill Oram of The Orange County Register

Scott’s stance shows.

Although the Lakers have (wisely) eschewed Scott’s plan of frequently forgoing 3-pointers, they still shoot way too many inefficient mid-range jumpers. Despite statistics that could help identify and fix shortcomings, the Lakers’ defense remains worst in the NBA. Kobe Bryant, before his season-ending injury, played much more than teams that monitor player health through analytics would have used the 36-year-old.

This is not something to brag about.

Scott likes to emphasize his old-school bona fides and championship pedigree, and analytics don’t fit that picture. Not in his mind, at least.

But what he’s doing is not working in any sense.

Does he position his players to succeed? Has he motivated them? Do they follow his lead in terms of dignity and effort?

Available evidence – most of all, the Lakers’ 15-41 record – suggests no.

And now Scott openly says he does not believe in using the information available to him to improve the team.

More than anything, the Lakers need better players. Scott’s stance on analytics is far less important than that.

But the Lakers could also use a coach who believes in using all the tools at his disposable to help his team win.

Who uses only hammers because they don’t believe in screwdrivers? It’d be downright absurd.