Carmelo Anthony hints he could miss time to rest ailing knee

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Carmelo Antony has been dragging a sore knee around with him all season, he’s just tried to play through it.

That may be coming to an end. After the Knicks’ ninth straight loss Sunday Anthony spent 40 minutes in the training room getting treatment on that knee, only to emerge and suggest he may need to shut it down for a while to rest the knee and get it right, reports Marc Berman at the New York Post.

“At this point, it’s evaluating and seeing,’’ Anthony said. “Some days are better than others. It’s a matter if I want to continue to play on it and the pain threshold. The flip side to that is we are losing games. I hate it, I hate to sit on the sidelines and watch my teammates.

“At this point, sitting down with trainers and coaches and seeing what’s best for everybody. If it’s best for me to sit out, take some time to get it right, then that’s a decision we’ll have to make. But they’ll have to pull me out.”

The Knicks play Wednesday in San Antonio then Friday at Boston before returning home to face the Raptors on Sunday.

Anthony is averaging 22.9 points a game and is the fulcrum of the Knicks triangle offense this season, and he’s done so with an above average true shooting percentage of .540. He’s played fairly well but carried a heavy minutes load, being out there for nearly 36 minutes a game.

Even with his play the Knicks are bad. They have the 21st ranked offense (in points per possession) and worse yet the 27th ranked defense. Put simply, with or without ‘Melo in the lineup they are going to have a lot of ping-pong balls in the NBA Draft Lottery next spring (even though the NBA doesn’t use ping-pong balls anymore, but you get the idea).

I’m not saying the Knicks should intentionally tank, but Magic Johnson isn’t totally wrong — if you’re going to be bad, be bad and increase your odds at a higher pick. And while you’re at it take care of the franchise forward you just agreed to pay $124 million over five years. Don’t let the knee become a chronic thing.