Josh Smith bulks up, he says to play inside more. Riiiiiight.

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Last season was like every other one with Josh Smith, the only difference was he was wearing a Pistons uniform instead of a Hawks one. I could break down the numbers for you on why he needs to play closer to the basket, but I think this visual representation works better to explain my point. Ladies and gentlemen, this is Josh Smith’s shot chart from last season.

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For the record 44.5 percent of Smith’s shot attempts came from beyond 16 feet — he loves the long two and the above the arc three. He just can’t hit those shots. He’s a beast in close but fancies himself a stretch four.

It has been that way for years despite annual promises things will be different. So understand my skepticism when Smith told the Pistons’ official Web site he has bulked up so he can play inside more this season.

“I’m ready to play whatever position is asked of me,” said Smith, noticeably thicker in the chest and shoulders, in his first day back at the Pistons practice facility on Tuesday. “But I’m going to play a lot of (power forward) and that was my main focus on being able to get more in the weight room and put some more muscle on my body to be able to withstand that physicality in the paint. I played that position so much, so long in the league that I know how big you have to be in order to be able, night in and night out, to withstand that impact and that physical nature inside the paint.”

If Van Gundy can get Smith to play closer to the basket, he should get votes for coach of the year. It would be a big help for the Pistons’ offensive efficiency — let Jodie Meeks, Caron Butler and the other guards (except you, Brandon Jennings) shoot the threes.

Of course, if Smith starts playing closer to the basket as he should then you get into the spacing issues of having him, Andre Drummond and Greg Monroe all on the court at the same time. None of them can space the floor, which makes the Pistons much easier to defend. Which is why Smith’s natural inclination to step out and space the floor with his jumper kicks in, except for the whole “he can’t make that” problem.

How does Smith — a good passer — see himself being used?

“Being able to play in the mid-range and attacking,” Smith said of his likeliest role. “If somebody comes over to help out, I’ll be able to find the open man and I’m very confident that those players are going to knock shots down because they’ve proven it their whole careers.”

 

If Smith is in the midrange he’s not going to see doubles, he will get a lot of open looks from opposing defense. They want him to take that shot.

SVG’s got his work cut out for him.