NBA suspends Mavericks’ Raymond Felton four games for weapons charges

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The Knicks traded Raymond Felton to Dallas as part of the Tyson Chandler deal this summer, but there was something hanging over Felton’s head during that deal — felony gun charges.

He had been arrested in New York after he allegedly pointed a gun at his estranged wife. He eventually pled guilty to attempted criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a firearm, as well as knowingly having a large-capacity ammunition magazine and a pistol that was unlicensed. Felton was sentenced to 500 hours of community service and ordered to pay a $5,000 fine.

On top of that, the NBA has now suspended Felton the first four games of next season without pay, the league announced Thursday.

“I demonstrated poor judgment and I take full responsibility for my actions,” Felton said in a statement released by the Mavericks.

Mavericks owner Mark Cuban noted in his statement that Felton is allowed to serve is community service hours outside New York and can do them around Dallas.

Snarky Dallas fans took to twitter saying the suspension was a blessing for the Mavericks — Felton struggled mightily last season in New York (which now has Jose Calderon running the point, a much better triangle offense fit).

Felton is going to be fighting for minutes in Dallas with Jameer Nelson and Devin Harris, and if he plays like last season Felton isn’t going to get a lot of them.

Once the suspension ends Felton (rarely the best conditioned athlete in the league, to be kind) will get the chance to turn his career around under one of the best Xs and Os coaches in the game in Rick Carlisle, someone who will put Felton in good positions to succeed. Whether he does anything with that chance remains to be seen. Color me skeptical.

Report: Celtics telling teams Gordon Hayward, Marcus Smart absolutely not available in trades

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The Celtics – run by Trader Danny Ainge – entered the season with as much trade speculation as ever.

But off to an impressive 11-3 start, Boston sounds content with its current roster.

Brian Windhorst of ESPN:

Boston has made it clear to anyone who has asked that their core players are absolutely not available. That includes, sources said, both Hayward and Smart, players who have been floated as possible trade chips in the past.

Only a few players are absolutely not available, and they’re all far better than Gordon Hayward and Marcus Smart. For the right offer, the Celtics would trade either.

But this report is significant because, if Boston isn’t willing to even engage negotiations, that makes it much more difficult to find that right offer.

Hayward was returning to All-Star form until hurting his hand. Smart is playing incredible defense. They help a Celtics team trying to win now. Hayward (29) and Smart (25) are also young enough to have staying power. Though Hayward can opt out this summer, Boston will have his Bird Rights, and he just chose the Celtics during his last free agency. Smart is locked up a couple additional seasons at a very-reasonable salary.

With trade speculation, the question is always: Why would another team value a player more than his current team does? Perhaps, another team just adores Hayward and Smart so much, it would surrender enough to entice Boston. But we know how the Celtics feel about those two, and that’s why a deal is so unlikely.

Report: 76ers didn’t offer Jimmy Butler five-year max contract once free agency opened

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The 76ers offered Jimmy Butler a five-year max contract, according to Tom Haberstroh of NBC Sports. However, Adrian Wojnarowski reported Philadelphia wasn’t offering Butler a five- or even four-year max deal.

What explains the discrepancy?

Maybe timing.

Zach Lowe of ESPN:

But on June 30, there was no five-year maximum offer for Butler, multiple sources say.

That doesn’t explicitly say the 76ers offered Butler a five-year max earlier, but it intentionally leaves the possibility wide open. After all, when Philadelphia traded for Butler in the final year of his contract, everyone knew he expected a max contract. He said so himself. After early tension, the 76ers still expressed desire to re-sign Butler. As free agency neared, they kept sending those signals.

What changed?

Maybe Philadelphia had second thoughts about paying Butler so much. There are reasonable concerns. But it’d be odd if the 76ers went so far down the road toward re-signing Butler only to reverse course at the last moment because of internal evaluations. That assessment could have been made earlier.

Al Horford unexpectedly became available, and Philadelphia used Butler’s vacated cap space to sign him. With Butler and the capped-out Heat wanting him in Miami, the 76ers also leveraged another good playerJosh Richardson – in a sign-and-trade. Perhaps, once realizing it was an option, Philadelphia just preferred Horford and Richardson to Butler (and retaining J.J. Redick‘s Bird Rights). That’d be simple enough.

Whatever happened, I bet it’s the crux of the secret story Butler recently alluded to.

Nets to wear ‘Bed-Stuy’ jerseys (video)

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Nets forward Kevin Durant said, “The cool thing now is not the Knicks.”

Brooklyn is cool.

So, the Nets are getting more overt about connecting to the image of their borough. After wearing Notorious B.I.G.-inspired uniforms with Coogi-sweater-style trim, Brooklyn is slapping “Bed-Stuy” – the neighborhood brought to mass popularity by Biggie, Jay-Z and others – onto its jerseys.
Nets:

I can’t decide whether these jerseys are actually cool or trying too hard to be cool.

Also, the Nets apparently aren’t daunted by a Coogi lawsuit.

First non-white player in modern professional basketball, Wat Misaka dies at 95

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SALT LAKE CITY — Wataru “Wat” Misaka, the first non-white player to play in the league that was the predecessor to the NBA, has died. He was 95.

Misaka played three games for the New York Knicks during the 1947-48 season in the Basketball Association of America. He was the league’s first player of of Japanese descent.

A 2008 documentary called “Transcending: The Wat Misaka Story” told the story of what Misaka went through as a trailblazing athlete.

Misaka attended a 2013 Utah Jazz game to watch Jeremy Lin play.

The University of Utah athletic department said in a news release Thursday that Misaka died Wednesday in Salt Lake City. He grew up in Ogden, Utah.

Mikasa was the point guard on the Utah team that won the NCAA Tournament in 1944 and the NIT in 1947.