Tony Parker didn’t get a no-trade clause in his new Spurs deal. Why not?

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The Spurs announced a three-year contract extension for Tony Parker on Friday, one that will pay him the maximum amount allowed under the collective bargaining agreement, and will come in at just under $44 million in total.

But it won’t come with it the added security of a no-trade clause.

NBA rules are extremely prohibitive where no-trade clauses are concerned, and players like Parker who sign extensions to stay with their current team are not rewarded for their loyalty with the ability to veto a trade out of town in the future.

From Marc Stein of ESPN.com:

For those asking why Tony Parker did NOT get a no-trade clause in his new deal, it’s because no-trade clauses can’t be added to extensions

This is Tony Parker’s third successive extension w/Spurs. Third successive time, in other words, San Antonio has kept him off open market

All six NBA players who have full no-trade clauses had to opt out and get to the open market to get them: Kobe, Duncan, Dirk, KG, Wade, Melo

Dwyane Wade and Carmelo Anthony joined the very select group of players with this particular power by opting out of the final years of their respective deals this summer, even though it was extremely unlikely that either of them would end up agreeing to a deal to play anywhere else.

The Spurs value continuity above all else, along with players who will sacrifice a bit to fit into the team’s championship-level culture. Parker has proven to be a perfect match, so he isn’t likely worried about being traded anytime soon. And, San Antonio hasn’t made a habit of dealing its best players while in the midst of its current run of making the playoffs in 17 straight seasons.