Does trading Joel Anthony mean Heat are going after Andrew Bynum? Maybe.

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It was obvious why Golden State wanted Jordan Crawford as the centerpiece of the three-team trade that went down Wednesday — Stephen Curry has played more minutes than any point guard in the league this season and they need to get him some rest the second half of the season (not to mention the whole injury history concerns).

It’s obvious why Boston was willing to take on Joel Anthony and his salary in this same trade — they are rebuilding and they got three picks out of the deal.

Finally on the surface it was obvious why Miami would get in on this deal — it saves them about $7.7 million in salary and luxury taxes this season and next. Even if you’re the defending champions there is no reason to spend millions on a guy at the end of the bench.

But this could clear the way for one more deal, if the Heat are willing to waive either the just acquired Toney Douglas (they already have Mario Chalmers and Norris Cole at the point, Douglas is a luxury) or Roger Mason Jr., and if the Heat are willing to put some of that just saved salary back on the books:

Get Andrew Bynum. Zach Lowe at Grantland makes this educated guess in his column on the trade.

Mini-prediction: One of those guys, probably Douglas, will go in order to make way for Andrew Bynum. The big fella cleared waivers long ago, the Clippers (another possible Bynum suitor) are on the verge of signing Hedo Turkoglu (BALL), and we’ve yet to see Greg Oden in a real basketball game. Regardless, this is a no-brainer for Miami. They traded a guy who was never going to play, despite his prodigious pick-and-roll defense skills, and saved a ton of money.

Greg Oden is activated and in uniform for the Heat Wednesday, but the point remains the same.

For all of Bynum’s flaws, he’s still a better player than Oden at this point — the Heat are looking ahead to a Eastern Conference Finals showdown with Indiana and Roy Hibbert, and Miami knows they need size. Bynum’s post game is a poor fit in general with the “space and pace” offense Miami runs, but either Bynum or Oden (or both) would be in a limited role until called upon to bang on big bodies on the post season.

The question is how much is Miami willing to pay for this? Bynum wants more than the league minimum, Miami still has its $3.2 million tax payer exemption it can spend on Bynum. But does Miami really want to add on that salary and the associated taxes just to have another chip to play against the Pacers?

Just something to watch.