Jason Kidd, Brooklyn Nets come up empty against Chicago Bulls

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The Brooklyn Nets and Chicago Bulls woke up early, left on their sleeved Christmas pajamas and opened the NBA’s Christmas Day slate.

Jason Kidd probably wishes he never got out of bed.

A game after blasting his team for “kind of getting comfortable with losing,” Kidd oversaw Brooklyn’s 95-78 loss to Chicago on Wednesday, an embarrassing – and nationally televised – display for the most expensive basketball team of all time.

Down nine points with 4:26 left in the third quarter, Kevin Garnett already on the bench, Kidd pulled his other four starters.

“I’m going to go with the same group, go with the reserves right now until we get back into the game,” Kidd told ESPN’s Chris Broussard before the fourth quarter, moments after boos reached their peak volume.

Eventually, Kidd reneged on that pledge, because the Nets never got back into the game. By the time Deron Williams and Mirza Teletovic returned with 8:45 left, Brooklyn trailed by 21 points.

Kidd is shifting blame, placing it on an accomplished group of veterans who don’t deserve the public shaming from a rookie head coach.

Garnett, Paul Pierce and Jason Terry – who’ve each won a championship – and Deron Williams comfortable with losing? I don’t think so.

The Nets don’t accept losing. They’re incapable of winning.

Their best player, Brook Lopez, is out for the rest of the season, but that’s just an unfortunate break. There are just as significant structural problems with how Brooklyn was assembled.

Last May, the Nets were upset by Chicago in the first-round of the playoffs. Not even eight months – and 10s of millions of dollars added to their payroll – later, the Nets are even less equipped to run with the Derrick Rose-less Bulls.

Brooklyn is older, less cohesive and more poorly coached.

For all Kidd’s showmanship about sitting his starters, it didn’t work. The Nets, in a 17-point loss, played Chicago even with all five starters in the game. In the nine minutes no starters played, Brooklyn was outscored by nine.

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Even with the prospect of falling to 9-19 with a four-game losing streak, Brooklyn had a chance entering this game, because the Bulls had similarly underwhelmed this season. Despite the Eastern Conference falling further behind its Western counterpart, these teams are no longer close to last year’s versions that fought through a seven-game series in the 4-5 matchup. Instead, they hold the conferences ninth- and 12th-best records.

But disappointment is relative, and with Tom Thibodeau at the helm, the Bulls limited theirs.

Both teams started sluggishly until Thibodeau used a two-point guard lineup featuring D.J. Augustin and Kirk Hinrich for the first time all season. With both players capable of pushing the ball and initiating the offense, entry passes suddenly coming from either side of the court, the Nets were lost and surrendered a 12-0 run.

The final results of the Augustin-Hinrich combo, though in just five minutes, were stunning. Offensive rating: 133.3. Defensive rating: 51.2.

It was the type of crafty adjustment Kidd rarely makes, allowing the rigid Thibodeau to run circles around him in even creativity.

Teletovic scored 10 points on five Brooklyn possessions early in the third quarter to briefly give the Nets the lead, but the Bulls overwhelmed Brooklyn without doing anything fancy. Chicago just defended as it always does, and six Bulls scored double digits.

Until the boos rained down during the final seconds – with a few spattering of jeers in between – the Nets fans were mostly quit during the fourth quarter. Only Taj Gibson’s powerful putback dunk really had them buzzing.

Garnett, Pierce, Terry and Williams were similarly quiet. Cameras caught them multiple times sitting on the bench, looking forlorn. In fact, it took a while for any Net to speak up.

When Kidd did, his words ran hallow.

Kidd frequently hangs his head on the sideline. If his team is following his lead, it’s here.

And nowhere else.

Markelle Fultz’s new free throw stroke is… different.

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Philadelphia’s Markelle Fultz is in his own head with his free throw stroke now. (And, likely much more than that, but we’ll stick with the free throws for now.)

Earlier this week Fultz double-clutched a free throw attempt and his stroke was a mess.

Each game that stroke seems to change and the latest one is… different. Very different.

As Vecenie notes, this is actually an improvement in terms of the release, but that doesn’t make it good. Fultz was 1-of-2 in his one trip to the stripe (as of this writing).

Still, I have never seen someone pass the ball back-and-forth between their hands as they go into their shooting motion like that. Very, very odd.

Markelle Fultz’s agent denies rumor shooting woes due to motorcycle accident

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Why is 76ers guard Markelle Fultz‘s shot so screwed up?

Did he suffer an injury? Did he change his mechanics? Does he have the yips? Some combination?

Another theory presented by Brandon Robinson: Fultz got into a motorcycle crash last year.

Fultz’s agent, Raymond Brothers, via Kyle Neubeck of PhillyVoice:

“Markelle and the motorcycle, I saw the article that was sent, 100 percent not true,” said Brothers. “Quote me on that.”

The Collective Bargaining Agreement prohibits players from riding on motorcycles, though this theoretically could have been before Fultz signed his contract with Philadelphia. So, if this is true, there could be even more complications.

But Robinson’s report is too far-fetched to believe. Without more evidence, I’m not buying it.

Judge sounds skeptical of accuser’s arguments in appeal of Derrick Rose case

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Derrick Rose was found not liable during a civil rape trial in 2016.

The plaintiff appealed, and her argument was heard today. It doesn’t sound like it was well-received.

One of the appellate-court judges, Hon. Barrington D. Parker Jr., via Kyle Bonagura of ESPN:

“The main issue in this case is what happened that night between Doe and the three defendants,” Parker told Anand. “And you did a good job of presenting your case that what happened on that evening was nonconsensual, that she was raped.

“The defendants, as I look at the record, had powerful defenses to that presentation, which at the end of the day, the jury bought. You had a nine-day trial and this jury was out in what, 15 minutes? And you lose on every single claim. The jury just didn’t buy your case. No trial is perfect, but your evidence concerning the night in question came in and the jury had an opportunity to hear that.”

Following the trial as it unfolded, it seems the jury made the correct decision. Doe’s case was presented and considered. There wasn’t nearly enough evidence against Rose to find him liable.

That doesn’t mean he didn’t rape Doe. Her accusation counts for something. But at a certain point, if her claims can’t be credibly substantiated, Rose deserves a chance to move on. Police also investigated Rose and didn’t charge him.

The Court of Appeals has not yet ruled on Doe’s appeal, but it sounds like Rose is one step closer to putting this behind him legally.

Mark Cuban on Mavericks’ sexual-harassment scandal: ‘It’s behind us now’

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Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said he erred by not being involved enough in the franchise’s business side, allowing a predatory work environment to fester.

But he also didn’t appear at the press conference after the investigation’s results were released, leaving new CEO Cynthia Marshall to face the public.

Why?

Cuban on 1310 The Ticket, via Brad Townsend of The Dallas Morning News:

Because it’s Cynthia’s company now to run on the business side.

I’m the owner of a lot of different companies and I have CEO’s who run them. And it’s her’s to run and she’s good. And when you find someone that’s great at what they do, you let them do their job. Now, did I learn and I’ll communicate more with it? Yeah. But I’m not going to go into any of the details other than do say she is phenomenal at what she does and she deserves the respect that she’s earned and the Mavs are a much better organization and will be. And the NBA will be better because other teams and the NBA itself also are using her as a resource.

all the people that were involved are gone. . . The reality is, it’s behind us now. We did what we had to do. We’ve moved immediately. We brought in Cynt. Cynt’s a superstar. She’s changed the culture completely. That’s all you can do.

No organization is perfect. I’ve made my mistakes. The organization made its mistakes and we fixed them. There’s really no reason to suspend me or do a lot of the things people speculated about.

The difference between now and before is I talk to Cynt almost every day. Whereas the previous leadership . . . I talked to Cynt more the first month than I did per year, or five years, than I did in the past, because I was focused on basketball. And I don’t care what anybody writes. I don’t care what anybody thinks. I don’t care what anybody says. Anybody who watched and was there, recognized it.

Cuban clearly trusts Marshall to run the organization well. But he also trusted the previous regime to run the organization well, and look how that turned out.

I hope Cuban talking to Marshall daily creates the appropriate level of accountability. I hope Cuban is correct that the Mavericks’ problems are behind them.

But a new problem – the continued employment of a team photographer accused by multiple women of sexual harassment – arose under Marshall’s watch. The photographer, Danny Bollinger, was still travelling with the team and fired only after his accusers – felt unheard by the Mavericks – went public.

That creates plenty of questions about whether the appropriate mechanisms are in place to protect employees.

Cuban and the Mavericks must prove much more before deserving the benefit of the doubt this is behind them.