Wall, Sanders got their rookie extensions, what about the other rookies?

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John Wall will be with the Wizards for five more seasons, making $80 million. Larry Sanders will be with Milwaukee for four more years, $44 million.

Those are the first two extensions to the rookie deals out of the 2010 draft. They were both expected and both got done early — teams have until Oct. 31 to make the call and they usually pull the trigger about when you buy your Halloween costume (admit it, that gets done on the 29th if you’re early).

So what about the other guys in the draft class? Let’s take a look at the top 15 picks:

1. John Wall (Wizards). He got his, five years at $80 million.

2. Evan Turner (Sixers). We’ll be kind and say not likely. Turner may have some value to the rebuilding Philly team but they are not going to extend him, rather they will let him become a restricted free and see what price the market sets for him. And then they may let him walk.

3. Derrick Favors (Jazz). Drafted by Nets, he was one of the big pieces that moved west in the Deron Williams trade. This season with Al Jefferson and Paul Millsap gone, Favors is going to get a real opportunity to show what he can do. Don’t expect the Jazz to pay him before he proves it however, he will be a restricted free agent and how he plays this season will determine how much he makes down the line.

4. Wesley Johnson (Lakers). Drafted by the Timberwolves but they didn’t keep him around and the Lakers picked him up on a minimum deal. He can’t get an extension even if he deserved it.

5. DeMarcus Cousins (Kings). Expect this one to get done. Cousins should have been a top three pick in this draft — when on he may be the single best player in this draft. While there are serious questions about maturity, the rebuilding Kings need Cousins. They need him to grow and evolve personally and his game, but they need him. The question will be price, but the Kings will likely sign him to a healthy contract.

6. Ekpe Udoh (Bucks). Drafted by the Warriors and now in Milwaukee. Don’t expect and extension here, the Bucks see Sanders and John Henson as their front line of the future.

7. Greg Monroe (Pistons). This is an interesting one. The Pistons see Monroe along with Andre Drummond as a potential front line of the future, but with some big money owed Josh Smith, a healthy chunk to Brandon Jennings and the Drummond extension coming up how much will Detroit offer Monroe? A deal could get done, but if the market sets Monroe’s price next summer there are questions if the Pistons will pay it.

8. Al-Farouq Aminu (Pelicans). He was drafted by the Clippers but traded in the Chris Paul deal. The Pelicans would love for him to find a good role for this team off the bench, but he’s not getting an extension.

9. Gordon Hayward (Jazz). The two sides will talk and while the Jazz want to keep him the question will be price. This may be a case where he becomes a restricted free agent next summer and the Jazz match any offer, but they may find it hard to find common ground now.

10. Paul George (Pacers). This is the one other lock extension — Indiana will give him one and it will be at or near the max. The details just have to be worked out.

11. Cole Aldrich (Kings). He started in Oklahoma City and had a stint with the Rockets as well. He does not have a contract anywhere for next season; the Kings did not pick up their option year.

12. Xavier Henry (Pelicans). Does not have a contract for next season, did not have his option picked up.

13. Ed Davis (Grizzlies). He was drafted by the Raptors but was traded to Memphis in the Rudy Gay deal. I think he’ll have a kind of breakout season off the bench for the Grizzlies, he can play in this league, but he’s not getting an extension.

14. Patrick Patterson (Kings). Drafted by the Rockets now in Sacramento. No extension here.

15. Larry Sanders (Bucks). He got his, four years at $44 million.

If you’re looking for a couple dark horses how could get extensions (not likely but could at the right price), try Avery Bradley with Boston (the No. 19 pick) and Greivis Vasquez of the Kings now.

Jimmy Butler says his meeting with Thibodeau, Timberwolves is Tuesday (today)

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There are a lot of questions surrounding Jimmy Butler‘s meeting with Tom Thibodeau and the Minnesota Timberwolves brass: Can the Butler/Karl-Anthony Towns relationship be repaired? Is Thibodeau the guy who could repair it, or is he entrenched on one side of that battle? Will the situation be resolved enough for Towns to sign the max extension to his rookie contract that has been sitting on the table since July? Will Butler asked to be moved?

That meeting had been reported to be Monday, but Butler said on Twitter it’s Tuesday, and did so in a snide way.

Who cares if the reporting (by Jon Krawczynski and Shams Charania of The Vertical) on the day was one off if the substance of the meeting is the same? It’s not some massive error that throws the entire reporting into question. This feels like a high school history teacher testing about the date for the battle of Gettysburg and not why it was a turning point in the Civil War — the substance is what matters more.

Butler doesn’t deny or get into the substance of the meeting, which is what matters.

What comes out of that meeting will have a significant impact on the Timberwolves one way or another this season. Minnesota won 47 games last season and made the playoffs for the first time since 2004, but it’s hard to see how they take a step forward if the locker room remains this fractured (and in a very deep West they need to take a step forward to make the playoffs again this season).

USA rolls past Panama in World Cup qualifying, 78-48

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PANAMA CITY (AP) — U.S. coach Jeff Van Gundy came into the start of this second round of qualifying for the FIBA Basketball World Cup cautioning his players that they would face enormous challenges.

They clearly heeded his words, and the Americans are now closing in on a trip to China next year.

Reggie Hearn scored 12 points, Dwayne Bacon added 10 and the U.S. easily got past Panama 78-48 in a qualifying game Monday night. The Americans have won both of their second-round qualifying games so far, winning them by a combined 87 points.

“It’s just an honor to be able to go to another country and wear this jersey,” said U.S. forward Henry Ellenson of the Detroit Pistons. “It’s just something really special and I love doing it. I was so excited to get the invite. This was a blast and a hell of an experience.”

The U.S. outrebounded Panama 50-34, held the hosts to 31 percent shooting and trailed for only 67 seconds in the early moments. Van Gundy went to his bench early and often, rotating players throughout in part because of a steamy feel inside the arena named for Panama’s boxing legend Roberto Duran.

“I think our greatest strength is our depth,” Van Gundy said. “Again, we’ve pretty much done this throughout. We play 10 or 11 guys, anywhere from 10 or 11 minutes up to the low 20s. We try to take advantage of our depth. Tonight, the crowd was good, but it was warm in there.”

And now, Nov. 29 – the next day of qualifying games in the Americas Region – sets up as enormous.

The U.S. and Argentina are tied atop Group E with 7-1 records and will play that day with outright control of first place in the group standings up for grabs. Uruguay and Puerto Rico will meet that same day, each entering with 5-3 records, meaning the loser there will be three games behind the U.S.-Argentina winner with three games left in qualifying.

The top three teams in Group E are guaranteed spots at the World Cup, which starts in China on Aug. 31.

After the way they played Monday, it seems like only a staggering collapse would keep the Americans from qualifying.

The U.S. used a 16-0 run – needing only about two minutes – in the fourth quarter to turn what was a relatively one-sided game into an even bigger rout. Chasson Randle, Hearn and Travis Trice all made 3-pointers to get that spurt going, and Ben Moore‘s layup with 6:30 left gave the Americans a 73-40 lead.

“It feels great. It moves us that much closer to qualifying,” Hearn said. “It moves us that much closer to the U.S. getting to the World Cup and getting the whole thing.”

The U.S. got an ideal start in a hostile arena, running out to a 16-3 lead as Panama opened 1 for 11 from the field.

The Americans were in control throughout, though there was a brief stretch late in the first half where the U.S. grip on things seemed to slip ever so slightly. Panama got within 31-23 with 2:04 left in the half on a jumper by Tony Bishop Jr. before Hearn and White combined to score the final five points before the break and send the Americans into intermission with a 13-point lead.

When the second half started, the U.S. resumed pulling away. Frank Mason, Dakari Johnson and Bacon scored the first six points of the third quarter, and the Americans’ lead was quickly pushed out to 42-23.

 

Report: Sports Illustrated’s Lee Jenkins to take front office job with Clippers

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Selfishly, this makes me sad because I’m not going to get to read more of his work now.

Lee Jenkins is more than just one of the best NBA writers out there, he is one of the best sports journalists out there. A fantastic reporter with a great eye, Jenkins is an artist of a storyteller. He’s the guy other NBA writers are in awe of. He’s the man who co-authored LeBron James“I’m Coming Home” about his return to Cleveland, and more great in-depth stories than there is room to mention here.

And he’s about to leave Sports Illustrated for the Los Angeles Clippers, a true WojBomb from Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN.

Jenkins commented to Sports Illustrated.

“Sports Illustrated called on my 30th birthday, the greatest gift of my professional life,” Jenkins says. “I was one of those kids who grew up running to the mailbox on Thursday afternoons. SI taught me to read, and then, to write. With dream jobs, reality often disappoints, but everything about SI only exceeded my imagination. I’ve worked alongside my idols, Tim Layden, Tom Verducci and S.L. Price, and with my friends, Michael Rosenberg, Chris Ballard and Greg Bishop. There is no honor in this business like sharing a page with them.

“SI remains the ultimate platform for sportswriting and I would not leave for another media outlet. But I was offered an extraordinary opportunity to work in the front office of an NBA team and see the league I cover from a different angle. I’ve been privileged to tell a lot of triumphant basketball stories over the past decade. With Steve Ballmer and Jerry West, Lawrence Frank and Michael Winger, Doc Rivers and Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, I’m going to try to help build one.”

I’m not sure exactly how they will define Jenkins’ role with the Clippers, but I have no doubt he will do it well. Plus, inter-office emails for the Clippers are about to take a ridiculous leap in quality.

 

League sends out updated salary cap projections, jump coming in future years

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The past two seasons, the free agency market has been tight. Following the drunken-level spending spree of 2016 — the year that gave us the Joakim Noah, Luol Deng, and so many more anchor contracts — teams were cautious and out of money.

That’s about to change, because the salary cap is about to jump next summer, and some of those terrible contracts are starting to come off the books. This week the NBA updated its salary cap projections to teams, and Shams Charania of The Vertical got ahold of the memo.

For comparison, the cap is at $101.9 million, with the luxury tax is at $123.7 million.

With nearly half the players in the NBA as free agents next summer — did you notice all the one-year contracts this summer? — and the jump in cap space, about 20 of the NBA’s 30 teams could have cap space for a max player. Next summer is going to be wild.