Wall, Sanders got their rookie extensions, what about the other rookies?

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John Wall will be with the Wizards for five more seasons, making $80 million. Larry Sanders will be with Milwaukee for four more years, $44 million.

Those are the first two extensions to the rookie deals out of the 2010 draft. They were both expected and both got done early — teams have until Oct. 31 to make the call and they usually pull the trigger about when you buy your Halloween costume (admit it, that gets done on the 29th if you’re early).

So what about the other guys in the draft class? Let’s take a look at the top 15 picks:

1. John Wall (Wizards). He got his, five years at $80 million.

2. Evan Turner (Sixers). We’ll be kind and say not likely. Turner may have some value to the rebuilding Philly team but they are not going to extend him, rather they will let him become a restricted free and see what price the market sets for him. And then they may let him walk.

3. Derrick Favors (Jazz). Drafted by Nets, he was one of the big pieces that moved west in the Deron Williams trade. This season with Al Jefferson and Paul Millsap gone, Favors is going to get a real opportunity to show what he can do. Don’t expect the Jazz to pay him before he proves it however, he will be a restricted free agent and how he plays this season will determine how much he makes down the line.

4. Wesley Johnson (Lakers). Drafted by the Timberwolves but they didn’t keep him around and the Lakers picked him up on a minimum deal. He can’t get an extension even if he deserved it.

5. DeMarcus Cousins (Kings). Expect this one to get done. Cousins should have been a top three pick in this draft — when on he may be the single best player in this draft. While there are serious questions about maturity, the rebuilding Kings need Cousins. They need him to grow and evolve personally and his game, but they need him. The question will be price, but the Kings will likely sign him to a healthy contract.

6. Ekpe Udoh (Bucks). Drafted by the Warriors and now in Milwaukee. Don’t expect and extension here, the Bucks see Sanders and John Henson as their front line of the future.

7. Greg Monroe (Pistons). This is an interesting one. The Pistons see Monroe along with Andre Drummond as a potential front line of the future, but with some big money owed Josh Smith, a healthy chunk to Brandon Jennings and the Drummond extension coming up how much will Detroit offer Monroe? A deal could get done, but if the market sets Monroe’s price next summer there are questions if the Pistons will pay it.

8. Al-Farouq Aminu (Pelicans). He was drafted by the Clippers but traded in the Chris Paul deal. The Pelicans would love for him to find a good role for this team off the bench, but he’s not getting an extension.

9. Gordon Hayward (Jazz). The two sides will talk and while the Jazz want to keep him the question will be price. This may be a case where he becomes a restricted free agent next summer and the Jazz match any offer, but they may find it hard to find common ground now.

10. Paul George (Pacers). This is the one other lock extension — Indiana will give him one and it will be at or near the max. The details just have to be worked out.

11. Cole Aldrich (Kings). He started in Oklahoma City and had a stint with the Rockets as well. He does not have a contract anywhere for next season; the Kings did not pick up their option year.

12. Xavier Henry (Pelicans). Does not have a contract for next season, did not have his option picked up.

13. Ed Davis (Grizzlies). He was drafted by the Raptors but was traded to Memphis in the Rudy Gay deal. I think he’ll have a kind of breakout season off the bench for the Grizzlies, he can play in this league, but he’s not getting an extension.

14. Patrick Patterson (Kings). Drafted by the Rockets now in Sacramento. No extension here.

15. Larry Sanders (Bucks). He got his, four years at $44 million.

If you’re looking for a couple dark horses how could get extensions (not likely but could at the right price), try Avery Bradley with Boston (the No. 19 pick) and Greivis Vasquez of the Kings now.

Rumor: The Cavaliers might try to flip Andre Drummond in trade at draft, or in July

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When J.B. Bickerstaff takes over as the new coach in Cleveland today, he will inherit a big, slow frontcourt of Kevin Love and Andre Drummond that will make a combined $60 million next season.

Will he still have that frontcourt when training camp opens next fall?

We know the Cavaliers tried to trade Love at the deadline but the remaining three years, $91 million on his contract after this season made that difficult. Instead, Cleveland surprised the league when it added Drummond at the trade deadline.

Now comes a rumor from Greg Swartz at Bleacher Report where an anonymous former GM says he thinks once Drummond picks up the $28.8 million option on his contract — something expected around the league — the Cavs will try to trade him, too.

“I don’t think [Drummond and the Cavs] will last long,” one former NBA general manager said. “I could see them trading him to a team this summer if he agrees to pick up his option. They could also do a sign-and-trade if he agrees to a new long-term deal. I don’t think he’ll be in Cleveland for long.”

For the record, the Cavaliers deny that is the case. GM Koby Altman said as much.

“Absolutely, we consider him a potential long-term play,” Altman said. “Obviously, he has a player option that if he picks up, we think we’re in good shape in terms of our cap space. There’s no better money spent than on Andre Drummond if he picks up his option.”

There could be interest in Drummond as an expiring contract next season because teams are trying to clear up cap space for a deep summer of 2021 free agent class (particularly if Giannis Antetokounmpo does not sign the $254 million supermax contract the Bucks will offer this summer). There may be teams interested in the 26-year-old Drummond longer term — he is averaging 17.7 points and 15.8 rebounds a game as a traditional big — just not at anywhere near his current salary.

Expect a lot of Cavaliers trade rumors around the draft and into July as they try to add talent. Don’t be surprised if Drummond is in some of those rumors; the Cavaliers should explore everything.

Also, don’t be surprised if Love and Drummond are the starting 4/5 for the Cavaliers when the season tips off next October.

 

Counter-report: John Beilein will receive some of remaining salary from Cavaliers

Cavaliers coach John Beilein
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Initial reporting suggested John Beilein will walk away from the rest of his contract with the Cavaliers.

But apparently he’ll get a payout.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Beilein and the Cavaliers negotiated a financial settlement that will pay him a portion of the remaining money on his 2019-20 contract, league sources said. He left the University of Michigan and signed a five-year contract with Cleveland that included a team option for the final season, a deal that paid him more than $4 million a season, league sources said.

That doesn’t sound like a substantial settlement (relatively).

But Beilein had some leverage. Because he did so poorly, it seemed the Cavs might just fire him at the end of the season. While it appears to be his choice to walk away now, everyone seemed ready to move on soon enough.

There could have been more of a fired-or-quit standoff. But Beilein was so done, he left a lot of money on the table. That’s still the story, even if he’ll walk away with some.

Kevin Durant not close to return, but his jumper still looks wet

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Kevin Durant will not play an NBA game this season.

His jumper, however, looks to be in midseason form. Following All-Star Weekend, a video surfaced on Instagram of Durant working out at UCLA, and his shot remains a thing of beauty. His pull-up works, too.

There’s some debate around the league about just how good 31-year-old Durant will be when he returns.

When he left he was the best player on the planet, an unstoppable scorer who could defend LeBron James in the clutch of a game, KD was a two-time defending Finals MVP at the peak of his game. Suffering a torn Achilles means he’s not going to have the same level of explosiveness, but when you’re pushing 7-foot tall (in shoes), have a high release over your head, can hit from anywhere, and have a deadly fade away, does it matter if you lose half-a-step?

With Kyrie Irving possibly done for the season in Brooklyn, these videos provide a little hope to Nets fans. Get this roster healthy next season and they can hang with anyone in the East.

Chris Bosh: “I’m disappointed” not to be Hall of Fame finalist

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MIAMI (AP) — Chris Bosh is not hiding his frustration about not being a finalist for this year’s enshrinement class for the Basketball Hall of Fame.

The former Miami and Toronto forward released a video statement on social media Tuesday, using some version of the word disappoint – be it “disappointed,” “disappointment” or “disappointing” – no fewer than 15 times in 5 minutes.

Bosh was a surprising omission last week from the class of eight finalists announced by the Hall as still being under consideration for enshrinement this year, a list that included contemporary players Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett. The class of inductees will be revealed in Atlanta on April 4 at the men’s college basketball Final Four, and the Basketball Hall of Fame ceremony is in Springfield, Massachusetts, on Aug. 29.

“I’m going to be honest with you,” Bosh said. “I’m a competitive man. I’ve been competing my whole life. A lot of people don’t really know that about me, but I’m a fierce competitor. Losing bothers me. Coming up short bothers me. It always has, you know, since the moment I started playing basketball and it kind of bleeds over into everything that I do. So I’ll just get ahead of it. And so you hear this from me, I’m disappointed.”

Bosh is one of 13 players in NBA history to average 19.2 points and 8.5 rebounds in a career that included at least 11 All-Star selections.

The other 12 – Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Wilt Chamberlain, Karl Malone, Shaquille O’Neal, Charles Barkley, Moses Malone, Hakeem Olajuwon, Larry Bird, Bob Pettit, Patrick Ewing, Elvin Hayes and Elgin Baylor – are all in the Hall of Fame.

Bosh is also the only Hall-eligible player with 17,189 points, 7,592 rebounds, 1,795 assists, 11 All-Star selections and two championships who is not already in, or a finalist this year for, the Hall of Fame. There are other players with those numbers, such as LeBron James and Dirk Nowitzki, who are not yet eligible because they’re still playing or retired too recently.

“One of the things people like to say is, ‘Oh, next year,’” Bosh said. “What if there’s not a next year? That’s something that I think about every day. And I hope you think about it as well, but what if there’s not a tomorrow? What does that even mean? That is a definite question that’s been on my mind quite a bit, but I just have to be honest with you guys. I’m very disappointed.”

Bosh, who turns 36 next month, said he wishes he was still playing and believes he would still be in the NBA if not for the health issues that abruptly ended his career in 2016. Bosh had at least two bouts with blood clots.

He was an All-Star for Miami in his final season, 2015-16. He was averaging 19.1 points and 7.4 rebounds that season and had just arrived in Toronto for that year’s All-Star Game when a clot in one of his legs was discovered.

He never played again. Bosh eventually came to grips with that reality, saw his jersey be retired by the Heat – the team with whom he won two championships, a stint perhaps most notably remembered by his rebound and assist that set up Ray Allen’s season-saving, game-tying 3-pointer with 5.2 seconds left in Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals against San Antonio. Bosh also blocked a 3-point try by Danny Green at the end of overtime to seal Miami’s three-point win, and the Heat would go on to win Game 7 for their second straight title.

“I’ve been disappointed with my career coming up short,” Bosh said. “I feel that I should still be playing basketball right now, but that’s neither here nor there. That was in my goals. That was in my plans and it just did not work out like that. I don’t want to be in this position. Now I’m here dealing with that. Had other plans, started making plans on the potentiality of going in with such a great class, didn’t even qualify. You know what I mean? … It’s just disappointing.”