Knicks predictably drop Game 4 to Pacers, fall behind 3-1

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George Hill tried to call timeout as he was falling out of bounds, but the official didn’t realize and instead called a foul Amar’e Stoudemire, who protested to no avail.

Sorry, Knicks, nobody is stopping this runaway series – at least not since Frank Vogel made that mistake in Game 2.

The Pacers beat New York, 93-82, tonight to take a 3-1 series lead. If anyone thinks this is a fluke, they haven’t been paying attention.

The Knicks changed their starting lineup, but not their results. Kenyon Martin started for Pablo Prigioni in an attempt to match Indiana’s physicality, but the switch didn’t result in much more than a few comical fouls that illustrated how overmatched New York is even when going big.

The matchups in this series play to Indiana’s favor, but simply, the Pacers are better than the Knicks. Even in the regular season, Indiana had a better Pythagorean win percentage – historically a better indicator of postseason success than actual win percentage – than New York. And despite their tweaks, the Knicks, who trailed by as many as 18, couldn’t overcome that.

The Knicks were a mediocre rebounding team during the regular season, and they were outrebounded, 54-36, tonight. The Pacers are an elite rebounding team, and New York just can’t keep up.

The Knicks took great care of the ball during the regular season, and they had just nine turnovers tonight. But that’s partially the result of an offense that doesn’t take enough calculated risks to find good shots.

The Knicks set NBA records for 3-pointers made and attempts during the regular season, and they attempted 28 tonight. But a game after taking  a season-low 11, New York forced too many long looks, shooting just 8-for-28 (28.6 percent).

Carmelo Anthony led the NBA in scoring, and he led the Knicks with 24 points tonight. Of the 11 players who scored 20 points per game and reached the playoffs, Melo had the worst-shooting teammates, and that didn’t change tonight, either. J.R. Smith (7-for-22), Iman Shumpert (0-for-6), Martin (0-3) and Jason Kidd (0-for-2 to push his scoreless streak to eight games) were particularly loathsome for a group that shot 34 percent.

The Pacers, on the other hand, had excellent contributions from all their starters. George Hill scored 26 points on 14 shots. Paul George (18 points, 14 rebounds and seven assists) and David West (10 points and 10 rebounds) had double-doubles. Roy Hibbert (11 rebounds and three blocks) played splendid defense. Even Lance Stephenson, the fifth starter, played about as well as any Knick aside from Melo.

As I wrote after Game 3, Indiana has a stronger identity than New York right now – and the Knicks are straying even further from theirs. New York hasn’t used a single lineup in all 10 of its playoff games, and tonight’s starters – Raymond Felton, Shumpert, Melo, Martin and Tyson Chandler – hadn’t played together all season.

Shumpert played just 4:49 and missed all four of his shots before Smith replaced him, the earliest either team has gone to its bench in this series.  But Smith picked up right where Shumpert left off and missed his first four shots, too.

The Knicks can keep tweaking, but the fundamental truths of this series haven’t changed.

Kristaps Porzingis after conversation with new coach: “Man im excited!”

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David Fizdale learned a lot of lessons in his first go around as a head coach, spending 101 games with the Memphis Grizzlies. At the top of the list: Build a strong bond with your star player. Or else.

Fizdale is trying to do that, saying he would fly to Latvia this summer to spend time with Kristaps Porzingis. But first came a phone call, and that seemed to go very well.

It’s not just Porzingis. Fizdale was bonding with Frank Ntilikina, Emmanuel Mudiay, and Damyean Dotson on Wednesday night in Boston. A little “this is where we want to be” motivation.

Good on Fizdale for all of this.

The Knicks got the best coach for them on the board in Fizdale, and so far the new front office — general manager Scott Perry and president Steve Mills — are making smart decisions. Knicks fans should be optimistic. Knicks ownership just needs to be patient (not James Dolan’s strong suit), because with no Porzingis for a large portion if not all of next season the team will struggle. Wins will be hard to come by. Fizdale needs a season to develop players and lay the foundation for what he wants to build, while the new front office needs time to clean up the salary cap mess that is New York right now.

With some patience, the Knicks could have something special in a few years. And Fizdale may have found the right home for his talents because he’s already got players buying in.

Report: Police officers involved in Sterling Brown’s arrest suspended 15, 10 and two days

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Bucks guard Sterling Brown was tased and arrested in January despite not being violent or overly combative while being questioned about a parking violation.

Gina Barton, Mary Spicuzza and Ashley Luthern of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

The Milwaukee police officer who first confronted Milwaukee Bucks rookie Sterling Brown outside a Walgreens in January was suspended for two days, the Journal Sentinel has learned.

Two supervisors who later arrived, escalating the situation, were suspended for 10 and 15 days, sources said. Several other officers were reprimanded.

I don’t know whether these suspensions are the appropriate punishment.

But police too often trampling on the rights of people, especially minorities, is a far greater problem than these three officers and this incident.

No, Tom Izzo is not going to coach the Orlando Magic

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The Orlando Magic have been looking for their next head coach — after letting go of Frank Vogel right after season ended — while Mike Budenholzer (Bucks), David Fizdale (Knicks), Lloyd Pierce (Hawks), James Borrego (Hornets), and Igor Kokoskov (Suns) all got jobs (plus J.B. Bickerstaff had the interim title taken away in Memphis).

Not much news had leaked out of Orlando through all of that process, outside of interest in University of Houston coach Kelvin Sampson and an interview this week with former Charlotte coach Steve Clifford.

Then came a report from Michael Scotto of The Athletic that the Magic had interest in Michigan State coach Tom Izzo.

It didn’t take long for people close to Izzo to shoot that down.

A few points of clarification here. First, plenty of NBA front office executives have thought Izzo would make a great NBA coach and have reached out with feelers over the years. I have no doubt the Magic were interested, and may well have reached out (directly or through back channels) to gauge interest. That’s what smart organizations do.

At this point in his career, at age 63, it’s hard to imagine Izzo making the leap to the NBA — and if he does it will be for a Godfather offer (in both money and roster). With all due respect to Aaron Gordon, that’s not Orlando. Never say never, but like Mike Krzyzewski and others who could have made the leap to the NBA, at this point Izzo seems a college lifer. He’s in one of the best jobs in the land, a place where he is revered and respected, and he’s not likely to change that up now.

You can’t really blame him. It’s hard to leave a good job — just ask Jay Wright. But with Izzo, NBA teams will still ask occasionally, just to make sure.

Steve Kerr calls NFL’s new national-anthem policy, which is strikingly similar to the NBA’s, ‘idiotic’

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The NFL released a new national-anthem policy that requires players to stand on the field or remain in the locker room (or similar location) during the song.

That didn’t sit well with Warriors coach Steve Kerr.

Melissa Rohlin of the Bay Area News Group:

Good thing Kerr doesn’t work in a league that mandates players, coaches and trainers “stand and line up in a dignified posture” during the anthem, that suspended a player for sitting during the anthem, that warns players for chewing gum or being in the bathroom during the anthem, that has a team that blocked a black anthem singer who wore a “We matter” jersey.

Oh, wait.

He does.

The NBA, like the NFL, is first and foremost a business seeking profit. When confronted with social issues, from Donald Sterling to “I can’t breathe” shirts, the NBA has always kept an eye on its wallet.

With the threat of anthem protests looming, the NBA proactively met with players to head off any kneeling. That was business strategy, nothing grander.

The result? Players linked arms during the national anthem in the name of same vague unity, co-opting the space and distorting the message of Colin Kaepernick’s more meaningful protest.

Eventually, teams stopped linking arms during the anthem. Nobody really noticed when it fell off.

All the while, no sponsors or fans were aggrieved.

The NFL is just trying to get to the same point with a similar policy.

But the NFL already alienated its players through the heavy-handed implementation of this policy and years of other issues. The NBA has established greater trust from its players, both by finessing them in talks about societal issues and actually standing behind them, like the Bucks did with Sterling Brown.

There are plenty of opportunities to criticize the NFL relative to the NBA. The leagues’ national-anthem policies are not a good one.

And spare me the idea that leaders trying to divide us from on high is What’s Wrong With Our Country. Centuries of racism have already divided us.

Some leaders, like Donald Trump, exploit those divisions. Other leaders talk fancifully of unity without actually reconciling what caused the divisions.

But the actual divisions were already significant.