Metta World Peace says his style of play is aggressive, but not dirty

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It can be extremely frustrating to watching Metta World Peace continually make violent plays that are meant to instigate or agitate his opponents, and then hear him try to explain away his actions afterward.

It’s not that World peace is lying or being disingenuous. He truly believes that plays he’s been penalized for — such as the subtle punch he gave to the Pistons’ Brandon Knight, and the elbow to the head of Kenneth Faroed that the league came down on him for a few days later — are well within the realm of reasonable in an NBA basketball game.

Obviously, they are not. But that didn’t stop World Peace from defending his style of play at the Lakers’ practice facility on Saturday during an interview session that lasted almost 20 minutes.

From Sam Amick of USA Today:

“It’s not like I (brought) this aggression to the league,” World Peace said. “I didn’t invent this. This is what we watched. This is what we saw. The Bill Laimbeers and the (Dennis) Rodmans. They played hard. And they wasn’t trying to hurt nobody. They just played hard. They played with passion. And we grew up wanting to play with passion. So when guys say we’re dirty, we’re just playing hard, man. We’re not playing dirty. We’re just playing, we’re reacting, we’re going hard. We want to win.”

Laimbeer arguably was just fine with hurting people as a member of the “Bad Boys” era Pistons teams that won back-to-back championships in 1989 and 1990, but we’re getting into semantics.

World Peace was responding to questions about that play in Denver, where Nuggets head coach George Karl later said that he felt it was premeditated. Whether it was or wasn’t, World Peace unquestionably has a long history of making excessively physical plays, and it’s going to continue to haunt him if he continues to make them, plain and simple.