Lakers will remain in Buss family. But now a new legacy begins.

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Lakers fans have always felt uneasy talking about the reality that hit the team today — life for the organization after Jerry Buss, who passed away Monday morning.

The Hall of Fame Lakers owner was the man with the vision and plan that made the Lakers the most successful franchise in the NBA of the last 30 years. He was brilliant at marketing but he also hired people with good basketball instincts and he understood the value of stars in the NBA. Under him, the Lakers made the NBA finals 48 percent of the years since he bought the team.

Now his children take over the organization and a new legacy begins. Every title, all the success so far goes on Jerry’s side of the Lakers ledger. It’s now tabula rasa.

If one thing should be clear from what the family said Monday is should be this — the Lakers are not being sold. It is something the family said in a statement in January, said in a statement again Monday and was reiterated by a team spokesman later on Monday at a press conference. The Buss family will continue to control the franchise.

“It was our father’s often stated desire and expectation that the Lakers remain in the Buss family. The Lakers have been our lives as well and we will honor his wish and do everything in our power to continue his unparalleled legacy,” the family said in a statement.

Jerry Buss’ six children each have a stake in a complicated trust that gives them as a group a majority ownership of the franchise (believed to be about 65 percent, with AEG the next largest owner at about 30 percent). Jim, Jeanie and Johnny manage the trust. Each family member has some role in the organization.

Jim Buss has and will maintain ultimate control of the of the basketball side of the operations (something he has basically done for several years now working with Mitch Kupchak). However, on the basketball side Jerry was always the ultimate decider, now that falls to Jim. Jeanie Buss will continue to run the business side of the operation, as she has done for a decade. She has a fantastic reputation around the league with other owners.

Reports had surfaced that, at least before their father’s recent turn for the worse, Jim and Jeanie had not spoken since Jeanie’s fiancé Phil Jackson was interviewed but turned down to return as Lakers coach.

The question on everyone’s mind is “can Jim live up to his father’s legacy? Or will there be changes?” In the short term, probably not much changes. In the long term… that remains to be seen.

Jerry was a gambler, but a guy who always did his research then trusted his conclusions. Like the good poker player he was, when he took a risk it was calculated not impulsive. He stayed true to his vision.

Whether Jim Buss has both the vision and ability to pull that off remains to be seen. His test starts now.

If Jeanie and Jim work together, the Lakers could and should remain one of the most powerful franchises and brands the NBA has. However, there is the potential Shakespearian-level drama if there is a struggle for power.

And if that happens Lakers fans should be worried, because the fantastic success of the organization started with stability and vision from the top.

PBT Extra: Philadelphia has Jimmy Butler. Now what?

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Not long after the trade sending Jimmy Butler to Philadelphia was announced, there were some Sixers fans were on Twitter planning the championship parade route.

Reality, of course, is never quite so simple. The Orlando Magic made that clear knocking off Philadelphia in Butler’s debut.

What should we expect from these Sixers now? I get into it in this latest PBT Extra. Expect exceptional defense. However, are the big three of Buter/Joel Embiid/Ben Simmons willing to make the sacrifices necessary to their game to win at the highest level? We will see.

Reggie Bullock game-winner gives Pistons coach Dwane Casey victory in return to Toronto

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Revenge is a dish best served with two seconds left in a tie game.

Pistons coach Dwane Casey – certainly not thrilled with the Raptors firing him earlier this year – guided his new team to a 106-104 win in his return to Toronto tonight. Detroit erased a 19-point second-half deficit and got the ball with two seconds left, giving Casey and Reggie Bullock chances to shine.

Casey drew up a great play, an alley-oop to Glenn Robinson III. But Pascal Siakam made an even better play to knock the ball out of bounds.

The Pistons’ second play of the possession proved even more effective, as Bullock slipped toward the rim and hit the game-winner.

What a satisfying victory for Casey.

Reports: Steve Kerr chose and Warriors players supported suspending, not fining, Draymond Green

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The Warriors suspended Draymond Green one game for his argument with Kevin Durant during and after Golden State’s loss to the Clippers on Monday.

Sam Amick of The Athletic:

Jackie MacMullan on ESPN:

What about an internal fine? And what I was told this morning was that the rest of the players on this team didn’t support that, that the rest of the players on the team felt this had to be to done and that they’re all prepared, on that plane ride to Houston today, to get those guys together and put this behind them for now.

Marcus Thompson II of The Athletic:

Green was surprised by the heavy-handedness. A fine was expected. Green had just come back from injury, giving him a rest day for Tuesday’s game against Atlanta and a private fine would have been an acceptable rebuke of his behavior. He was fined a few thousand dollars when he went after Kerr in the locker room in Oklahoma City in 2016. He didn’t think this incident was nearly as bad, so the punishment being drastically worse was shocking.

I wonder whether Green will feel as if the Warriors are ganging up on him. Many see his suspension as Golden State’s attempt to appease Durant before free agency, and the original issue escalated because Green thought there was already too much emphasis on Durant’s free agency. This could push a stubborn Green deeper into a corner.

Or he could realize his peers wanted him suspended and see that as a wakeup call. He might put more stock in that than Kerr’s point of view.

It’s too early to determine how this will go, but the starting point is apparently a divide between Green and everyone else.

Kyrie Irving, teammate of 12-year-veteran Al Horford: Celtics need 14- or 15-year veteran for leadership

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The Celtics just had a 1-4 road trip, the lone win coming in overtime against the lowly Suns. Most Boston players (except Marcus Morris and, lately, Kyrie Irving) look out of sorts offensively.

Irving, via Chris Forsberg of NBC Sports Boston:

Looking at this locker room, me being in my eighth year and being a ‘veteran’ as well as Al [Horford] and [Aron] Baynes. Right now I think it would be nice if we had someone that was a 15-year vet, a 14-year vet that could kind of help us race along the regular season and understand it’s a long marathon rather than just a full-on sprint, when you want to play, when you want to do what you want to do.

Al Horford is in his 12th season. His team, the Hawks then Celtics, have made the playoffs every season of his career.

I’m not sure Irving intended this as a slight of Horford. Irving certainly didn’t forget about Horford, whom Irving mentioned the sentence prior.

But I’d definitely understand if Horford felt slighted. He’s experienced enough to provide that veteran leadership. So is Irving for that matter.

Ultimately, these comments might prove benign, just more weird words from Irving. Still, they’re potentially significant enough to keep an eye on Boston’s leadership situation.