Magic’s Hedo Turkoglu suspended 20 games for positive steroid test

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Tell me again how nobody in the NBA would do steroids…

The Orlando Magic’s Hedo Turkoglu has been suspended 20 games by the league for testing positive for methenolone, the league announced. Methenolone is an anabolic steroid.

Turkoglu’s suspension starts Wednesday night and he can return March 27 (vs. Bobcats).

Turkoglu released a statement through the Magic saying this was an accident.

“While I was back home in Turkey this past summer, I was given a medication by my trainer to help recover more quickly from a shoulder injury. I didn’t know that this was a banned substance and didn’t check before taking it. I take full responsibility for anything that goes into my body. This was a complete error in judgment on my part and I apologize to the Orlando Magic organization, the league, my teammates, and the Magic fans. I know I have let down a lot of people and I am truly sorry for my mistake.”

Pardon me if I believe him about as much as I believe Barry Bonds, Alex Rodriguez, Lance Armstrong and so on and so on….

The Magic’s GM Rob Hennigan has his players back in a released statement, as he must.

“Hedo unknowingly took a banned substance,” Hennigan said. “There are more than 125 banned substances on the NBA List, and we spend a lot of time educating our players on the contents of that list and will certainly continue to do so moving forward. We believe this was an honest mistake.”

This really isn’t a blow to the Magic — Turkoglu has been terrible for them this season. He has missed all but 11 games due to a broken hand (suffered in the season opener) and back problems and when he has played he has averaged just 2.9 points, 2.1 assists and 2.4 rebounds per game.

Other recent suspensions for steroid use include O.J. Mayo for 10 games in 2011, and Rashard Lewis  for 10 games in 2009.

The constant refrain from everyone around the league is that there is not a steroid issue in the NBA, and there may not be to the extent other sports have seen. But with millions of dollars plus the perks of an NBA lifestyle on the line, to suggest players wouldn’t take something that could help make them stronger, recover faster and help bounce back more quickly from injuries is naive. At best.