Doc Rivers says he didn’t know the details of Rondo’s assists streak, no one believes him

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Remember Rajon Rondo playing through to the end of a garbage-time blowout his Celtics were suffering at the hands of the Pistons on Sunday?

Sure you do.

It was a disappointing display of individual stat-stuffing, and it couldn’t have happened without the complicity of Rondo’s head coach, Doc Rivers.

After the team practiced on Tuesday, Rivers claimed to have no knowledge of the particulars of what Rondo was trying to accomplish.

From Fluto Shinzawa of the Boston Globe:

“I don’t even know what it is, I swear to gosh,” Rivers said. “I have no idea what he’s chasing. I just hear that he’s got a streak going. Who is he chasing? I don’t even know that.”

Magic Johnson owns the NBA record of 46 straight games with 10-plus assists. Rondo trails John Stockton by three games.

Rondo extended the streak in Sunday’s 103-83 loss to the Pistons. Rondo recorded his 10th assist with 51 seconds left in the game. The streak would have ended had Rivers not sent Rondo back out in fourth-quarter garbage time.

“We were getting blown out, and I just told him, ‘Stay in and get it,’ ” Rivers said. “I didn’t know what. I knew it was a 10-assist streak.”

Anyone believe Rivers here? Didn’t think so.

Without knowing exactly what streak was being chased and how close Rondo was to breaking a record held by Magic Johnson, why would Rivers risk injury to his team’s best player by leaving him in to pile up otherwise meaningless statistics in a game that had long since been decided?

The answer, obviously, is that Rivers definitely knew there was a streak in play. And even if he didn’t know the exact details of the record Rondo was chasing, he absolutely was aware that whatever it was, it carried a certain level of significance.

NBA promotes five referees, including two women, to full-time status

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Ashley Moyer-Gleich is eight years removed from playing in the NCAA Division II tournament. Natalie Sago officiated her first game six years ago, and the players were sixth-grade girls.

They’re in the NBA now – as part of one of the most elite sororities in the game.

Moyer-Gleich and Sago are among five officials who were promoted Thursday by the NBA to full-time status, making them the fourth and fifth women in league history to have that designation. They join former league refs Violet Palmer and Dee Kantner and current official Lauren Holtkamp as women to get formally hired.

“It’s difficult not to say Ashley and Natalie aren’t the second and third `women referees’ being added to the staff,” NBA vice president and head of referee development Monty McCutchen told The Associated Press. “But true equality comes when they’re just going to be `referees’ on our staff. And that’s what we’re really trying to achieve, this sense that their work warrants their advancement.”

The league also promoted Mousa Dagher, Matt Myers and Phenizee Ransom to the full-time level. Dagher further adds to the diversity of Thursday’s moves – he was born in Syria and moved to the U.S. as a 15-year-old in 2006. Myers spent more than a decade in the G League, and Ransom was there for six seasons.

“It’s such a momentous experience, to be working toward being part of the top of your craft and joining our staff,” Holtkamp said. “I’ll never forget getting the phone call and the same will be true for all five of these referees. And Natalie and Ashley, to know they’re joining our staff full-time, I’m beyond excited for them and what this means professionally and personally.”

Moyer-Gleich and Sago have both worked five NBA games this season – three regular season, two preseason. That was enough to confirm what McCutchen and other league officials have known for some time.

They’re ready.

“It’s been unreal, really,” said Sago, whose father has been a referee for more than 30 years. “It’s just been a very fast path for my officiating career and I wouldn’t change it for the world. I’ve had great role models, Lauren being one, and other NBA referees at these camps who kept saying, `You’ve got something.’ And all of a sudden, bam, I got the phone call and it’s such an honor.”

Sago got the call from NBA senior vice president and head of referee operations Michelle Johnson as her flight from one G League game to another earlier this month was taking off. She had to wait nearly two hours before she could call her father to give the news.

Her rise was also rapid: She got spotted at a Division III game in St. Louis – a Sunday afternoon game before about 15 fans – about three years ago and invited to an NBA camp.

“It’s very unique, how quickly it’s happened,” Sago said.

There will be a day when Moyer-Gleich, Sago and Holtkamp – along with any other women who follow them, something that seems quite likely with 17 other women working games in the G League this season – will get judged like any other referee, without the `female’ disclaimer.

They all know that day isn’t here yet.

“Everything that we do, that’s in comparison to the same exact thing our male counterparts might do, will be magnified,” said Moyer-Gleich, a standout player at Millersville University in her native Pennsylvania before starting her ref career. “What we do will be held under a microscope. Right, wrong, indifferent, I have come to peace with that.”

Palmer worked 919 contests before retiring in 2016. Kantner refereed 247 games between 1997 and 2002. Holtkamp has been assigned 214 games, and former non-staff official Brenda Pantoja – who never made the full-fledged ranks – was part of seven crews in the 2012-13 and 2013-14 seasons.

The NBA has made hiring more women throughout the league a top priority, and that extends to the refereeing roster. Over the summer, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said it was “a bit embarrassing” that the league currently has only one full-time female referee.

“I know that I’m good enough,” Moyer-Gleich said. “I know I belong there.”

McCutchen and other top NBA executives agree. He stressed that there was no mandate to hire women. His charge, he said, was to hire the best refs, period.

“I am committed that this be egalitarian,” McCutchen said. “If you can do the work, if you can stand up to the standards of our league but not the standing of our players and apply the rules, that should be open to any package it shows itself in.”

 

Rajon Rondo to have surgery on fractured right hand

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The Los Angeles Lakers did not want to put a timeline on his return when they announced Wednesday night that Rajon Rondo had fractured his hand. Officially the timeline was “weeks.”

It’s going to be more than a couple of weeks — Rondo will have surgery on his right hand in the next day, something confirmed by Luke Walton.

Lonzo Ball has been starting for the Lakers and that will continue (the 1-3 pick-and-roll with Ball setting the pick for LeBron James was something Portland had no answer for). The challenge is depth beyond Ball, the Lakers don’t have another traditional point guard on the roster. Luke Walton said Brandon Ingram will play some at the point now.

Ball said he is up for the added responsibility.

 

Carmelo Anthony’s time with Rockets over, will be away from team but on roster

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You will not see Carmelo Anthony in Rockets’ red ever again.

This is not a huge surprise, he has been away from the team for three games now, ever since his 1-of-11 shooting disaster in Oklahoma City. Both sides have been ready to move on and that has become official.

“After much internal discussion, the Rockets will be parting ways with Carmelo Anthony and we are working toward a resolution,” Rockets’ General Manager Daryl Morey said in a statement. “Carmelo had a tremendous approach during his time with the Rockets and accepted every role head coach Mike D’Antoni gave him. The fit we envisioned when Carmelo chose to sign with the Rockets has not materialized, therefore we thought it was best to move on as any other outcome would have been unfair to him.”

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN broke the story and added some details.

The problem is there is not a good landing spot for Anthony around the league, so expect this to drag out (as I reported before would likely be the case). Anthony may not want to go to a rebuilding team, and even if he did why would a young squad such as the Kings or Hawks want to take the ball out of the hands of their young learning-on-the-fly playmakers to give those shots to Anthony? On the other end, Anthony just showed he isn’t going to readily accept a role and blend in with a contender. That doesn’t leave a lot of options, and while there were rumors about the Lakers, Heat, Pelicans, and others kicking the tires on bringing him in they each seem to have decided it’s not a great fit.

In 10 games for the Rockets this season coming off the bench, Anthony averaged 13.4 points and 5.4 rebounds a game, shot just 40.5 percent overall and 32.8 percent from three, plus the Houston defense has been 10.4 points per 100 possessions better when he is off the court. At this point in his career, that’s pretty much who Anthony is. Anthony wasn’t the root cause of the Rockets’ slow start to the season, but he wasn’t fixing any defensive or three-point shooting problems, either. At this point, Anthony is a bench/role player in the NBA but feels entitled to a larger role and more deference from teams. With all that, it could be a while before a team steps up to take a chance on ‘Melo.

Tracy McGrady: Carmelo Anthony should retire

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Carmelo Anthony seems done with the Rockets.

Where should the former star go next? Tracy McGrady has a recommendation.

McGrady:

I honestly think Melo should retire. I really do. I don’t want him to go through another situation like this, and people are just pouring negativity on this man’s legacy. I really think, because it hasn’t worked out the last two teams, just go ahead and — you have a Hall of Fame career — just go ahead and let it go.

For what it’s worth, McGrady talked about coming back in 2014. Maybe he retired too soon. However, he said he’d return only if a team made him its focal point.

Some stars transition well into being a role player. Vince Carter is a prime example.

Others don’t. Anthony seems to fit the latter category.

But that doesn’t mean he should retire.

Anthony shouldn’t worry about McGrady or anyone else struggling to watch him decline. If he wants to keep playing and an NBA team will sign him, Anthony should sign. He doesn’t owe it to us to ensure we feel comfortable with his career. It’s his career.

Besides, Anthony’s legacy will be defined by his time with the Knicks and Nuggets. These late years will be forgotten. McGrady is known for the Magic, Rockets and Raptors. Nobody remembers his time with the Knicks, Pistons, Hawks and Spurs. The Basketball Hall of Fame practically even said his time San Antonio didn’t count!

That said, it might not be Anthony’s call. Maybe there’s a team so desperate for a scoring backup power forward, it’d benefit despite Anthony’s ego and defensive deficiencies. But Anthony might just be finished.

If that’s what NBA teams collectively decide, that’s how it goes.

But whatever say Anthony say still has, he shouldn’t worry about McGrady or any of the many like-minded watchers.