Rajon Rondo is not taking the bait on Ray Allen questions

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In a fascinating (albeit brief — it’s Rondo, after all) interview with Rajon Rondo Friday, Ethan Sherwood Strauss of Bleacher Report asked the Celtics’ dynamic point guard a number of fascinating questions. He did touch on the big question everyone wants to know, whether Ray Allen took his talents to South Beach because of his personal issues with Rondo.

Rondo ain’t biting:

B/R: There have been reports that Ray Allen went to the Heat because there was strife between you and him. Is that overblown? Is there any truth to those reports?

RR: I think Doc answered that question pretty much. I don’t have anything to say about that.

via Rajon Rondo Dishes on His Current and Future Status with the Boston Celtics | Bleacher Report.

No shock there. Rondo’s certainly not the cuddliest bear on the shelf, but he’s also not going to take any shots at anyone.

He’s just, you know, not NOT going to take any shots at anyone If the Miami rivalry was ugly and nasty last year, with Rondo and KG taking off before Game 7 even ended, it’s only going to get uglier with Ray on the other side. Don’t hold your breath for any pre-game handshakes between the two.

For me, though this was the most interesting question (outside of an adorable eating-eel anecdote):

B/R: You do throw that behind-the-back on the pick-and-pop a lot of the time to Kevin Garnett. What’s your favorite kind of pass to throw? Is is that one?

RR: Oh, I like throwing a cross-court one-hand bounce-pass between the defense to P (Paul Pierce). I’ll throw a little English on the ball, throw it between two, three guys that are trying to run extremely hard to the paint. Then you got Paul Pierce trailing for the three—and obviously I’m pleased when he makes it.

via Rajon Rondo Dishes on His Current and Future Status with the Boston Celtics | Bleacher Report.

First I like that Rondo talks about Pierce making it as if that’s an afterthought. The pass is what matters. Second, it, along with several other answers, show how instinctual and natural Rondo’s game is. He’s less of a chemist and more of an artist when it comes to the game, and it shows in both his creativity and approach. And maybe that’s why he’s such a handful to deal with at time. I mean, have you met any artists?