Adam Morrison impresses on sixth day of NBA Summer League

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LAS VEGAS — NBA Summer League finished up with its fifth consecutive day of basketball on Wednesday evening and, as usual, there was a lot of basketball played. Not all of it was good basketball, unfortunately, but it was all basketball and there were some good things happening.

The best thing that happened was the re-emergence of former first round pick Adam Morrison as he attempts to make the Los Angeles Clippers. Morrison put on quite the show en route to 23 points on 13 shots while nailing all three of his 3-point attempts … and he’d have scored even more if it the Summer League awarded style points (and not just for his hair).

Some of the other notable performances included the following players:

  • Tobias Harris played very well for the Milwaukee Bucks, but we’ve already talked about him on this very blog. In lieu of singing more Harris’s praises, Bucks rookie John Henson was also pretty impressive with an active 20 points and nine rebounds while making his Summer League debut. The rest of the team was largely inconsequential — and Larry Sanders in particular was actually disappointing — and the team actually ended up in the loss column despite Henson and Harris.
  • The Washington Wizards finished their Summer League foray with equal amounts of questions and answers as they were the first team to complete all five of their games. Bradley Beal continued to look very solid with 18 points, six rebounds and a pair of nice blocks — though he was only able to knock down one of his two free-throw attempts late in the game — while Shavlik Randolph had 11 points and 10 rebounds despite making just three of his 11 shot attempts.  Chris Singleton also put together a frustratingly-fun performance with 10 points, six rebounds, two steals, two blocks and seven fouls as he continued to be overly aggressive.
  • Undrafted rookie Scott Machado had a very good game for the Houston Rockets with 20 points, six assists and four steals while looking like the assist-man he should be after struggling earlier in the week. The Rockets got solid performances out of their drafted players, too, as Royce White finished with 15 points and 10 rebounds, Terrence Jones had (an inefficient) 16 points and nine rebounds and Jeremy Lamb scored 16 points to go with eight rebounds … though his complaining about his teammates not passing him the ball often enough was a bit distracting.
  • Harrison Barnes struggled quite a bit as he shot just 5-of-17 from the floor, but he was clutch down the stretch as he helped the Golden State Warriors to a 65-62 victory. Charles Jenkins was pretty solid in the first three quarters with 17 points, but ended up rather quiet down the stretch.
  • Jimmy Butler put together another good game for the Chicago Bulls on Wednesday afternoon scoring 24 points, but it was the play of Malcolm Thomas that continued to stand out after a stellar season in the NBA Development League. Thomas put together his second consecutive double-double with 10 points and 13 rebounds in a loss.
  • Cory Joseph, last year’s first round pick for the San Antonio Spurs, scored 22 points and dished six assists to look like the player fans hoped he’d become. D-League veteran Eric Dawson scored 11 points and grabbed 13 rebounds as he attempts to prove he’s big enough to play in the NBA’s post.
  • The Atlanta Hawks scored a paltry 67 points in a victory over the Dallas Mavericks, but the majority of them came by way of John Jenkins as he scored 21 points as he made 3-of-5 from beyond the arc. Fellow rookie Mike Scott was very efficient, too, needing just four shots to score 11 points as he grabbed seven rebounds in the victory.
  • The Dallas Mavericks took their first loss of the week, but it wasn’t due to the play of second round pick Jae Crowder. Crowder scored 20 points while staying active to compile eight rebounds and a pair of steals, but his teammates weren’t able to hold up their end of the bargain. Dominique Jones made just five of his 16 attempts to score 11 points (and losing his Summer League scoring leader title in the works) while backup point guard Justin Dentmon shot just 2-of-9 from the field to not quite counteract his five assist, zero turnover performance.
  • Austin Rivers didn’t play for the New Orleans Hornets after looking a bit subpar throughout their first couple of games in Vegas, but the team wasn’t lacking when free agent Brian Roberts took over point guard duties on Wednesday night. The veteran guard scored a team-high 16 points while matched up against first round pick Kendall Marshall to lead his team to victory.
  • Speaking of Kendall Marshall, he managed to get up more than the one shot he attempted in the Phoenix Suns’ first Summer League game. Unfortunately he got 10 shots up — and missed nine of them — while backup Diante Garrett had a more efficient seven points off the bench. Former Ohio State standout David Lighty started and scored just four points, but showed the defensive potential he’s known to have..

Day seven will hopefully continue with more great basketball — or at least fun if Adam Morrison continues to impress.

Take that for data: NBA preps for expanded betting on games

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LAS VEGAS (AP) — Here’s a scenario: LeBron James is four assists and three rebounds shy of a triple-double after three quarters. A bettor, who is watching at home and utilizing a mobile app, decides to gamble that James will get those assists and rebounds in the final 12 minutes. The wager then gets made before play resumes.

The NBA wants that bettor to see the best possible data.

So the league is seeking to get stats out quicker than ever.

Fast isn’t fast enough for the NBA anymore, not when it comes to stats – especially now that the U.S. Supreme Court has opened the door for states to allow wagering on games. The league has upgraded its stat systems in the past year to try and get its data out as close to real-time as possible, even aiming to beat the typical lag of 7-15 seconds that it takes for television or streaming services to show whatever happened.

It’s about what the NBA calls official data. The league’s stance is that getting accurate stats to bettors is critical so the player knows what they’re betting on and the casinos will know when to pay out or not. But how much value that data has for casinos – and whether they will pay anything for it – remains unclear.

“My view is we should be compensated for our intellectual property, but we can do that directly, again, with commercial relationships with gaming establishments,” said NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, whose league had hoped this matter would be resolved with federal regulation instead of various policies getting worked on state by state by state.

Silver met with betting officials in Las Vegas earlier this month, and how data should be provided was one of the topics on the agenda. The NBA has said it is seeking a 1 percent “integrity fee” on wagers, which the league said would offset their additional security costs and compensate them for the data they can provide.

The casinos, however, are balking at legislative mandates insisting upon the use of official data. Joe Asher, the CEO of bookmaker William Hill USA, told The New York Times that such a mandate “sets up monopoly pricing power. This whole thing of official league data is like a smoke screen.”

It’s a major issue to work through, especially if in-game betting – people betting on various aspects of games after they’ve already started – catches on in the United States the same way that it has in the United Kingdom.

In-game betting, which is huge in Europe, is still relatively small in this country. Most Nevada bookmakers say in-game options make up no more than 5 percent of their sports-wagering business, although William Hill has said it accounted for nearly 25 percent of its sports business in the U.S. during 2017.

Only a handful of states have legalized sports betting since the Supreme Court decision in May, though several more states are expected to get operations up and running in the next year or so. Bettors now have been largely playing the basics – will Team X beat Team Y by more than six points, will the teams combine to score more than 210 points, that sort of thing.

“There’s a couple things about official data that make it advantageous for sports betting,” said Scott Kaufman-Ross, an NBA vice president who oversees fantasy sports and gaming. “Most is the speed. … That’s important for in-game betting.”

The NBA switched last year to software provided by Genius Sports, a London-based company that collects and distributes official data for dozens of sports federations around the globe and even recently completed a deal to work with the NCAA. The NBA data collected by Genius has been distributed globally by Sportradar, which sends it to media outlets, broadcasters and betting outlets outside the U.S.

Sportradar, the NBA said, is now working on obtaining the ability to send the data to U.S.-based betting entities.

NBA stat crews all generally work the same way: a primary caller uses a code to describe a play as it happens, a primary inputter uses a touch-screen tablet to punch in what he or she hears the caller say into the headsets that the crew share, a secondary inputter cleans up any mistakes, and a secondary caller is in contact with league offices in Secaucus, New Jersey, and reviews any plays that need additional study.

Those various crews, many members of which have received training during the summer league in Las Vegas, are the ones who decide who gets an assist or a rebound.

“The NBA has always been front and center on rapidly deploying statistics, first because of our television partners and then the Internet happened and that was good for the Internet,” said Steve Hellmuth, the NBA’s executive vice president for media operations and technology. “So it’s kind of always been in our DNA.”

Report: Stephen Curry also skipping Team USA minicamp

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In 2015, then-USA Basketball chairman Jerry Colangelo declared a minicamp mandatory for invited players who wanted a chance to join Team USA in the Olympics the following year. (Colangelo didn’t exactly stick with that.)

New USA Basketball chairman Martin Dempsey isn’t bothering to set such a hard line a year before another major competition – the 2019 World Cup.

LeBron James will miss next week’s minicamp, and so will Stephen Curry.

Chris Haynes of ESPN:

Golden State Warriors All-Star guard Stephen Curry will not be in attendance for Team USA’s minicamp next week in Las Vegas, league sources tell ESPN.

The two-time NBA MVP, according to sources, will be spending time with his family, including his newborn son.

Curry and James will not be eliminated from consideration moving forward.

Curry and LeBron have both played all the way through the NBA Finals the last four years. I don’t blame them for taking time for themselves. They’re also good enough to still get onto Team USA in 2019 if they want to play. They have leverage other players might not.

If Kawhi Leonard is looking for attention-grabbing cover to attend the camp, he won’t get it from the NBA’s two biggest stars. If Leonard participates, he’ll be – by far – the biggest story there.

Are Raptors viable trade destination for Kawhi Leonard?

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The Lakers, Clippers, 76ers and Celtics have dominated Kawhi Leonard trade discussions for most of the summer.

But the Raptors have emerged as a trendy pick for the star’s destination. One betting site even gave Toronto even odds against the field – including the Spurs – as Leonard’s team to begin next season.

Are the Raptors actually a realistic landing spot for Leonard?

Brian Windhorst and Zach Lowe of ESPN discussed on The Lowe Post podcast.

Windhorst:

Toronto Raptors, I think they’re in the driver’s seat for Kawhi. Because I think the Lakers have given up. The Sixers have given up. And with the Nets, Bulls and Hawks spending their cap space, it makes it harder to assemble a multi-team trade. I think the Raptors are in the driver’s seat.

Lowe:

I’ve seen a lot of snark on Twitter that the Raptors stuff is a joke, that the odds went up because of something I said on my podcast and you said on TV. I’ve seen it being dismissed. It may not happen. Most NBA trades don’t happen. But if you think it’s a joke, you should probably recalibrate your expectations.

The Raptors can construct an offer built around:

Because DeRozan and Lowry earn more than Leonard, the Raptors could also take back a costly contract San Antonio wants to dump.

Such a deal would allow the Spurs to remain competitive now while gaining long-term assets under greater team control than Leonard, who can walk in unrestricted free agency next summer.

It’d also give the the Raptors a championship chance they wouldn’t have next season otherwise. The window might not remain open long considering Leonard’s health and contract status, but there’s something to be said for raising the ceiling when it can reach that level – even if it means lowering the floor. Plus, if Leonard left, Toronto could more easily transition into its next phase than if DeRozan and Lowry remained on the books.

This trade framework makes too much sense for the teams not to discuss it. But whether that’d result in an actual deal is another question.

Report: Kawhi Leonard considering participating in Gregg Popovich-led Team USA minicamp

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The Spurs want to repair their relationship with Kawhi Leonard and keep him long-term. Leonard wants to leave San Antonio. Potential trade partners want to know more about his health and mindset.

Something has to give.

Maybe it will next week.

Spurs president/coach Gregg Popovich, taking over Team USA, will direct a minicamp in Las Vegas. Leonard is invited and – in a surprising development after he missed the few months of the season due to a quad injury – might actually play.

Ramona Shelburne and Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

San Antonio Spurs star Kawhi Leonard is seriously considering participation in the USA Basketball national team’s minicamp in Las Vegas next week, an event for the embattled All-NBA forward to showcase the status of his recovery to prospective trade partners, league sources told ESPN.

Among NBA teams and USA Basketball officials, there is a belief that Leonard wants to participate in the camp, but could be dissuaded based on ancillary concerns.

Leonard holds some enthusiasm for showcasing his revitalized health in the wake of the quad injury that has been at the center of discord between the Spurs and him, sources said. The question being debated, sources said, is whether participating in the Team USA camp will ignite trade talks that deliver him to his preferred destination — the Lakers — or give the Spurs more cause to hold on to Leonard and push him to report to training camp in September.

For what it’s worth, there is conflicting reporting about Leonard’s preferred destination. Some say it’s the Clippers.

This low-intensity camp won’t be a chance for Leonard to prove he’s fully healthy, but he can show enough to ignite trade interest. Maybe that helps propel him out of San Antonio – though if it’s not to Los Angeles, how much would that mean to Leonard?

The camp could also give Leonard and Popovich a chance to reconnect. Depending on whom you believe, maybe some in Leonard’s camp or even Leonard himself don’t want to give the Spurs boss that opportunity.

If Leonard goes to Las Vegas, it’d become a media circus. All his movements and interactions, especially with Popovich, would be closely scrutinized. At one point, I would have figured the reserved Leonard would want no part of that. But I now believe we incorrectly assumed too much about him just because he’s quiet.

So, I’m not entirely sure what he wants – or what direction participating in this camp would send him.

Leonard knows more about the former. It’s on him to evaluate the latter.