2012 adidas Eurocamp preview

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The NBA’s pre-Draft camp in Chicago, which wrapped up on Friday, is the place where league front-office types get a combine-style look at U.S. college players. The equivalent for international players is adidas Eurocamp, a three-day event which kicks off June 10 in Treviso, Italy.

The camp is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year, and adidas, who has been affiliated with it for the last three, is making sure it remains the premier place for NBA teams to view and interact with international prospects. Houston Rockets director of scouting Artūras Karnišovas is in his first year as the camp’s director, and Minnesota Timberwolves assistant coach Bill Bayno is in his first year as the camp’s coaching director. Kevin McHale will be in attendance to hold a special clinic for bigs, and other familiar basketball names working the camp include Blazers head coach Kaleb Canales, Grizzlies assistant Dave Joerger, and Suns assistant Igor Kokoskov.

Chris Grancio, Head of Global Sports Marketing for adidas, gave me an overview of what the camp is all about, and explained how adidas is doing everything it can to continue to make it a success.

“We’ve really tried to focus on elevating all elements of the program,” he said. “As the official outfitter of the NBA, we’re very well-connected to the league, and we saw it not only as an opportunity, but a responsibility really to look at continuing to elevate and invest in this platform so it became better and better.

“Some specific examples — for us, it’s always about talent. We really focus on every year ensuring that we have the best players coming for the scouts that come over to watch them play. We focus on ensuring that we continue to develop and grow the content, so that the players that do come are getting the best possible basketball experience on the court, and a great experience off it as well. And then the last real objective that we set our eyes on in the recent past and immediate future, is really doing everything in our power to elevate the camp itself so that it becomes a true one-to-one experience compared to the Chicago pre-draft camp, which so many U.S. fans are used to seeing and hearing about.

“We’re also bringing Trajan Langdon over, to help really strengthen the coaching staff’s connection to the players. Trajan’s a little bit more of a younger guy, he had a fantastic career in Europe. He himself is an aspiring coach in the long-term, and it’s a great opportunity to bring somebody in that has a lot of similar, relevant experience to our players, and put him in a role where he can help connect, relate, and communicate with them over the course of the camp.”

The players’ experience seems just as important to adidas as ensuring that the practices, drills, and scrimmages showcasing them remain not only relevant to NBA teams, but consistent with the information they get on prospects from the states.

“We’ve made some big steps over the last year by including BAM (Basic Athletic Measurement) testing, which is the official biometric testing of the NBA,” Grancio said. “They partner with the league at the Chicago pre-draft camp to measure agility, jump height, quickness, and we’ve invested in bringing them into the Eurocamp environment so we can get the exact same metrics and readings off of all of the athletes that are participating. So if you’re a general manager, you can look at statistics that are absolutely identical, measured the same way, and certified by the same group of people to compare an athlete that might be coming from Slovenia, and a kid that’s coming from Kansas.”

In addition to skills testing (and unlike the Chicago camp where it is solely measurement and drill-based), the players have the opportunity to participate in games against one another. Some choose not to, of course, in favor of individual workouts where there is less downside and a player’s unique skill-set can be showcased.

The talent level at the camp, at least in terms of players who might make an immediate NBA impact next season, isn’t nearly as deep as in years past. Only one international player, shooting guard Evan Fournier of France, is projected as a possible late-first-round pick, while just a few others — Tomas Satoransky (combo guard, Czech Republic), Kostantinos Papanikolaou (small forward, Greece), Tornike Shengelia (power froward, Georgia), and Nihad Djedovic (wing, Bosnia) — are projected to possibly be taken in the second round.

As a comparison, last year’s camp had three top-10 2011 NBA draft picks attend — Jonas Valanciunas, Jan Veseley, and Bismack Biyombo. But the amount of NBA-ready talent is always going to fluctuate year over year, so the important thing for adidas is to do what they’ve been doing, which is to continue to put on the premier pre-draft camp for international players.

There are plans in the works to televise portions of the camp in the future, most likely through a partnership with NBATV. In the meantime, keep it here over the next few days as we bring you the latest news from Treviso.

Kings’ Bogdan Bogdanovic tweaks knee in FIBA qualifying, to have surgery

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This is why NBA teams don’t love it when their players go off to the national team over the summer.

Sacramento’s Bogdan Bogdanovic tweaked his knee playing for Serbia Monday, and now is going to have to have surgery on his left knee. It’s described as minor, but it’s still surgery. Here is the Kings’ release:

Sacramento Kings guard Bogdan Bogdanovic exited Serbia’s 91-65 World Cup Qualifying victory over Estonia on Monday after experiencing left knee discomfort early in the first quarter. Further evaluation revealed a minor injury to his left knee. On Monday, a minor arthroscopic procedure is scheduled at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, to be performed by Dr. Riley Williams. Bogdanovic is expected to make a full recovery and an update will be provided when it is available.

Bogdanovic had surgery on this same knee just after the season, and while this is considered less serious it’s still something to watch. Don’t expect to see him on the court preseason. The Kings have media day Monday and open training camp on Tuesday.

Bogdanovic, a 6’6″ sharp-shooting wing, averaged 11.8 points a game and shot 39.2 percent from three last season, making second-team All-Rookie.

Suns officially sign De’Anthony Melton for two-years, $2.3 million

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The Phoenix Suns are very high on De’Anthony Melton — he was the guy for the future they wanted when they took on Ryan Anderson‘s contract from Houston.

Friday, the Suns made it official and signed Melton.

If you’re wondering about the money…

Melton is a 6’4″ guard who could be a future backcourt mate with Devin Booker. Unless you’re a recruiting junkie, you probably first heard his name as the player in the middle of the NCAA/FBI recruiting scandal. He fell to 46th in the draft. However, at Summer League he showed why he was highly recruited and what he could become as a pro, averaging 16.4 points and 7.2 rebounds a game, showing potential as both a three-point shooter and defender. It’s just Summer League, and Melton looked like a guy who missed a season of play at times, but the potential is there.

The Suns are going to get to explore that potential at a reasonable price for a couple of seasons.

Markelle Fultz says last season was about injury, he’s back now with confidence

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Philadelphia went big game hunting in free agency and came up empty. If they are going to seriously challenge Boston this season for the top of the East, it’s going to be because of internal improvement — Joel Embiid needs to get better, Ben Simmons needs to get better…

And Markelle Fultz needs to be on the court and look like a No. 1 pick.

We’ve seen glimpses that his shot looks better after spending the summer with the shot guru Drew Hanlen, and at Sixers media day he sounded confident. Courtesy Matt Haughton at NBC Sports Philadelphia:

“I think it was a mis-term in words, but me and Drew have talked (after Hanlen said Fults had the yips),” he said. “What happened last year was an injury. Let me get that straight. It was an injury that happened that didn’t allow me to go through the certain paths that I needed to, to shoot the ball.

“Just like any normal person, when you’re used to doing something the same way each and every day and something happens, of course, you’re going to start thinking about it. It’s just normal….

“Everybody knows what happened last year, so this summer was really just me working to get my mechanics back, my confidence back, my swagger back. It was a very productive summer,” Fultz said. “I’m happy with the work I put in with Drew (Hanlen). We put up a lot of shots, a lot of hours in the gym. I’m happy with where I’m at right now going into training camp.”

Fultz is saying all the right things. That and $4 will get you a pumpkin spice latte at Starbucks (although why you’d want it is beyond me).

 

The proof starts Saturday in training camp and runs through the season. It’s about results now. Expectations for Fultz are high, but welcome to the life of a No. 1 pick. His bolstered swagger will be tested, we’ll see how he handles it.

Joel Embiid on DeAndre Ayton: ‘He’s about to get his ass kicked this year’

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At some point in the future — maybe not as far in the future as he thinks — a lot of NBA fans are going to turn on Joel Embiid and his unfiltered trash talk and social media presence. (Which, oddly, is very different from how teammates describe him, this seems to be more of a public persona.) It’s the nature of fame, we love the rogues and rebels until we don’t.

For now, Embiid is a lot of fun.

He went on the set of ESPN’s “The Jump” with Rachel Nichols on Friday (at Sixers media day) and when the picture of Deandre Ayton came up, well…

“He’s about to get his ass kicked this year.”

Embiid isn’t wrong.

Ayton is going to have a good rookie year, maybe very good (although the lack of a quality point guard to feed him the rock in spots he can do damage will hurt him), and at Summer League Ayton was a bit of a man-child against other rookies and young players. However, he showed flaws — his hands, for one, need to get better — and nightly in the NBA teams will roll out men who can match him and push back on him. It’s going to be harder than he realizes, and not just with Embiid or Rudy Gobert or DeAndre Jordan or Andre Drummond or Marcin Gortat and the other guys who can match up physically with him, but with the skill guys as well. Ayton isn’t going to push around Draymond Green easily. Al Horford is going to school him with skills.

Ayton is going to be on a learning curve this season, a steep one at times. All rookies get that. What matters is how he responds and how he develops. Expectations are rightfully high, but he’s got some learning to do.