Can Heat adjust to a Bosh-less world? Game 3 will tell.

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In Game 2, Miami tried to do what they normally do, and it didn’t work. LeBron James and Dwyane Wayne found limited driving lanes because Chris Bosh was not there to pull a big man away from the basket with the threat of his outside shot. On the pick-and-roll both defenders could focus on Wade or any other ball handler because Joel Anthony doesn’t post much of a threat.

Game 3 Thursday will be about adjustments. For both teams.

For the Pacers, the adjustment will be mental not technical — Miami is going to come out with a lot more energy and urgency, Indiana has to match that. If you’re a Pacer fan that just said, “of course we will, we’re at home,” I point you to the Celtics thrashing of the 76ers in Game 3 as example number one. Veteran teams have more gears and know how to reach them, you’re going to get an energized and desperate Heat team, and the Pacers have to match that.

The leadership to step up has to come from Danny Granger and David West.

For Miami, they could use three key things on the court.

First, more transition points. The Heat didn’t run as much as they need to in Game 2, and when they did they shot just 2-9. Not good enough. The Heat need to get Wade and LeBron the ball in transition and let them attack. The Heat need some easy transition points because in the half court it’s harder to come by.

Second, in that half court they need to establish LeBron in the post. That is one area they missed Bosh that LeBron can replace. At the start of the season the Heat went to LeBron in the post a lot but got away from it as the season wore on. They need to return to it, they need the post presence. Yes, with 7’2” Roy Hibbert lurking it’s not that easy, but LeBron can pass out of doubles. The Heat need the spacing.

Finally, the Heat just need somebody to knock down threes not named Wade or LeBron.

Credit the Pacers here — taking away the role players and the threes has been part of the plan since the start, as pointed out at eightpointsnineseconds.com. Miami’s role players shot 26 percent in Game 2 and if that trend continues he Pacers may be celebrating a lot at home the next couple of days.