With it time to write checks, Maloofs balk at Sacramento arena plan

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As has followed the long-standing pattern with the Maloof family — or at least half of the Maloof family — when it comes time to talk money on a Sacramento Arena deal to keep the Kings in that city, the family wants to get and not give.

But this time it may not matter because it is the city and the league that will have the final say on the Maloof’s plan.

The latest flare up in the plans to build a new arena for the Kings in Sacramento came to light on Thursday when it was reported by the Los Angeles Times and Sacramento Bee that the Maloof family would not pay its share of the predevelopment costs that have come due.

David Stern and the league have had to step in and help a little, reports the Sacramento Bee.

The NBA today came to the rescue of Sacramento’s arena deal, agreeing to advance about $200,000 in pre-development costs after the Kings’ owners balked at paying the money….

NBA Commissioner David Stern, in a statement to The Bee, said those pre-development expenses must be paid quickly. “Those discussions have stalled, but I have advised Mayor Johnson that the NBA will advance pre-development expenses on behalf of the Kings pending our report to the NBA Board of Governors at its meeting on April 12-13.”

A Maloof family spokesman in Los Angeles told the Bee today the team does not feel that it should share in predevelopment costs because the team is only a tenant in the building, which would be owned by the city.

This from a family that is ultimately expected to kick in $73 million for the arena deal in the agreement that was celebrated just a few weeks back. The Maloofs have a new crisis PR person helping them out, which has to make Kings fans uneasy. The Los Angeles Times says this puts Anaheim back in play.

This is the Sacramento soap opera — or more accurately cheesy reality show — that has been the arena drama (in various forms) for a decade. It is a mistake to think of the Maloof family as a unified front — they have been internally divided on the Sacramento arena plans, a move to Anaheim and probably over whether Reese’s are chocolate with peanut butter or peanut butter with chocolate. Reportedly on one side are Joe and Gavin, on the other it is George Jr. and Adrienne. It was pro-move George who was doing the speaking Thursday.

But right now, the Maloofs do not have all the power. They are not in control.

The league pushed aside the Maloofs and negotiated directly with the city to get the arena agreement that was reached in place (the Maloofs were part of that discussion but not at the heart of it). The league then stepped in and basically fronted the predevelopment costs for the family.

This is all going to land in the laps of the NBA Board of Governors next month. That group made up of the other NBA owners, who voted last year to force the Maloofs to give Sacramento another year to come up with an arena plan. That group is going to hear from Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson, from the league and from the Maloofs. It is that same board that would have to approve moving the team.

If the league and the city can make the deal works for the other owners, it will get approved and move forward. As they were during negotiations, the Maloofs will not be the side with all the power.

So while the latest move by the Maloof family to save a few bucks and assert some control is a bump in the road, it does not kill the project. The Maloofs do not have that power anymore. If the league and city can make the deal that the other owners approve, the deal will get done.

WNBA team rehearses ring ceremony at practice of team it beat in Finals

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The NBA does petty very, very, very, very, very, very, very well.

The WNBA is trying to give the NBA a run for its money.

The Minnesota Lynx and Los Angeles Sparks have met in the last two WNBA Finals, the Lynx winning last year and the Sparks winning the year before. Minnesota hosted Los Angeles in the season opener Sunday, and the Lynx unveiled their banner and presented players with rings.

Before that, while the Sparks were practicing in Minnesota, the Lynx played their video for the event.

Holly Rowe of ESPN:

The Sparks beat the Lynx on Sunday, but I don’t think that’s enough to override Minnesota’s power move.

Kobe Bryant on Kanye West’s comments: “What the hell are you talking about?”

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Kanye West, the President Trump backing hip-hop star, drew a lot of backlash for his comments on TMZ:

“When you hear about slavery for 400 years — for 400 years? That sounds like a choice. You were there for 400 years and it’s all of y’all. It’s like we’re mentally imprisoned.” 

Mentally, maybe in some cases. But more so physically, with guns and whips and attack dogs and a whole lot more weapons that were all on one side. Nobody chooses slavery.

Tuesday, Kobe Bryant surprised a group of about 300 high school students at WE RISE — a 10-day pop-up festival dedicated to sparking a movement for change in the mental health system — in Downtown Los Angeles. One of the students asked him about Kanye’s comments. Kobe is not down.

“I’m sure (I feel) the same way everybody else here in this room feels. What the hell are you talking about? I think that was my reaction as is everybody else’s reaction….

“The thing about our country is that you have the right to say whatever it is that you want to say…that’s the beautiful thing about living in a democracy. I think, for him, he’s one of these entertainers that’s always in a constant state of growth, he’s always challenging … himself, doing a lot of questioning internally himself…so I just take it for what it is and completely disagree.”

If I need to explain to you why Kobe is in the right here, you need to take a basic American history course again.

Good on Kobe for his comments. More importantly, good on Kobe for taking the time to promote mental health awareness.

“It’s easy for us as people to kind of ignore the emotional side of it,  especially when it comes to things that deal with negativity, things that deal with insecurity, things that deal with fear,” Kobe said. “It’s very easy to take the fear and just push it down, try to act like it doesn’t exist. The reason why it starts with imagination is because you first must imagine the life that you want to have. You must first imagine what it is you dream of becoming.”

Kobe did that, and now he’s got an Oscar. Oh, and a few basketball awards, too.

PBT Extra: LeBron, Cavaliers even series but Celtics far from dead

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If you want to make the case that the Cleveland Cavaliers are in the driver’s seat of the Eastern Conference Finals after sweeping two games at home, you’re in a good space. It’s a best-of-three and Cleveland has the best player on the planet on their side.

However, I still like the Celtics to hold on and win in seven.

I get into it in this PBT Extra, but the Celtics looked like a team that figured things out in the final three quarters of Game 4 (they just couldn’t make up for a disastrous first quarter), and they still have two games at home.

Either way, this feels like a series going the distance.

Did the Warriors deal Rockets a knockout blow in Western Conference finals?

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The Warriors beat the Rockets by 41 (!) in Game 3 of the Western Conference finals Sunday.

Biggest playoff win in Golden State franchise history.

Biggest playoff loss in Houston franchise history.

Biggest playoff loss ever handed to any team as good as the 65-17 Rockets.

“At the end of the day, it’s one win,” Warriors forward Draymond Green said. “It doesn’t matter if you win by 40 or if you win by one.”

Maybe it matters more than Green is letting on.

Golden State was the 17th team to -win a playoff game by more than 40 points. Of the previous 16, 15 – including the last 14 – won the series:

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The only exception came in my favorite playoff series of all-time, the best-of-three 1956 Western Division semifinals:

  • Game 1: St. Louis Hawks 116, Minneapolis Lakers 115
  • Game 2: Minneapolis Lakers 133, St. Louis Hawks 75
  • Game 3: St. Louis Hawks 116, Minneapolis Lakers 115

So, teams to win a playoff game by more than 40 are 15-0 in best-of-seven or best-of-five series. Will the Rockets buck the trend?

They can make adjustments. Maybe Houston’s strong regular season – better than any above blown-out team’s – indicates a rare capability to recover from this. Andre Iguodala‘s injury hurts Golden State. Teams sometimes make historic comebacks from blowouts, including against the Warriors.

But that Golden State ran toppled the Rockets so decisively in Game 3 suggests the Warriors are hitting a gear Houston won’t keep up with.