Jeremy Lin would like to trademark “Linsanity” himself

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Just a few days after “Linsanity” started to grip New York City, a couple of people filed to trademark that name, hoping to make a few quick bucks off the Jeremy Lin phenomenon.

Turns out, Jeremy Lin would like those bucks himself.

Lin has filed to trademark the word “Linsanity” and did so on Feb. 13, reports Bloomberg. That would be six days after Yenchin Chang (35 of Alhambra, California) and four days after Andrew W. Slayton (Los Altos, California).

However, it’s not always about just being first. Neither of those men have ties to Lin. The law tends to favor the person whose name is being used to make money, Lin’s attorney told Bloomberg.

“We’re prepared to enforce his intellectual property rights,” Pamela M. Deese, a partner in the law firm Arent Fox LLP, said in a telephone interview, confirming that she had filed the application on Lin’s behalf.

Trademark applications generally take about three months to be examined and published, according to Gary Krugman, a partner at the Washington-based firm of Sughrue Mion. As Lin, 23, is the subject of the phrase Linsanity, he would probably be successful in opposing an application filed earlier than his own, Krugman said.

“Nobody can register a mark if it falsely suggests a connection with a person or an institution,” Krugman said in a telephone interview. “I would guess that Jeremy Lin would be able to oppose on the grounds that Linsanity points uniquely and unmistakably to him.”

That seems fair, if anyone is going to make money off “Linsanity” shirts it should be Lin, not some random person on the other side of the country.

With a Harvard economics degree, you kind of think Lin will be on top of these types of things.