“Linsanity” has gone all the way to U.S. Patent office. Literally.

8 Comments

The only thing more American than the rise of Jeremy Lin — the Rocky-like tale of a talented but overlooked player, twice let go, sent to the D-League, never gives up and explodes when given the chance — is other people trying to make a quick buck his rise.

Which brings us to this note out of Bloomberg Tuesday:

Yenchin Chang, a 35-year-old Alhambra, California, resident, was the first of two people to file a trademark application for the term “Linsanity,” which is being used to describe the frenzy surrounding New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin. …

“I wanted to be a part of the excitement,” Chang, who attended East Los Angeles College and who works in the import/export business, said in a telephone interview. “I’m very proud of Jeremy.”

Chang, like Lin, is Taiwanese but Chang said the two are not connected.

In theory, Chang would get compensated for anything sold with “Linsanity” on it. But making this work in practice is another matter.

Milord A. Keshishian, an attorney with Milord & Associates, a patent, trademark and copyright firm in Los Angeles, said in a telephone interview that the law “doesn’t bode well” for anyone trying to make money through a Linsanity trademark.

“This looks like a bad-faith attempt to profit from Jeremy Lin’s recent acclaim,” he said of the trademark applications.

But trying to make a quick buck, that’s about as American as it comes. You knew somebody would try.