Carmelo says playing with Lin will be “dream come true”

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Reportedly, it was Carmelo Anthony — in street clothes due to a pulled groin — going to Mike D’Antoni at halftime of the Knicks game against New Jersey and suggesting to play Jeremy Lin more that kicked off “Linsanity.”

Monday, the guy who came to New York to see himself on the back pages of the tabloids had to answer the questions about how he will fit in with Lin.

Anthony doesn’t see a problem. Anthony is still out with a groin injury and is expected back later in the week. Here is what he said about playing with Lin when that happens, via ESPNNewYork.com.

“When I get back Jeremy will have the ball in his hands and I’m playing off of that,” Anthony said on Monday….

“When I’m reading the stuff (about how he might not fit with Lin), it’s more funny than anything because at the end of the day I know what I bring to the game, I know what I bring to this team,” Anthony said on Monday after missing practice due to a strained right groin. “My teammates know that. But to say, ‘How can I fit in?’ It’s easy; give him the ball and space out. I get back to doing what I know how to do best. So we’ll see…

“I know there’s questions about, ‘Can I fit in?’ and stuff like that, but this is like a dream come true to me,” Anthony said. “It takes some pressure off of me. I don’t have to play point guard. I don’t have to try to get Amare (Stoudemire) 20 points, try to get this guy 20 points, me try to go out there and get 25-30 points a night, play defense, rebound do the whole thing.”

Anthony is right about that part. He tried his best — his last season he assisted on just 14.7 percent of his teammates baskets when he was on the floor, that has jumped to 24.3 percent this year — but playing the point-forward facilitator is not his forte. He is a scorer, pure and simple. He has worked better coming off screens or being in the post and getting fed by guys like Chauncey Billups in the past.

But he also was a ball stopper back with the Nuggets — he still put up a lot of shots and ran a lot of isolations. His last full season in Denver he got 36.5 percent of his shot attempts in isolation, 17.7 percent in post up (stats from mysynergysports.com). Those kinds of numbers here would change the flow of the Knicks offense.

We’ll find out later this week, it looks like.