Eric Gordon says of not reaching deal, “business is business”

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Eric Gordon rejected the Hornets for an extension to his rookie contract.

Gordon is the centerpiece coming to New Orleans from the Chris Paul trade with the Clippers, but Gordon has only played two games with his new team due to a bruised knee. And it is now going to be at least three more weeks (and maybe six) before he gets back on the court, according to the team. Because the Hornets didn’t have enough problems this season.

While he has the potential to be one of the best shooting guards in the game, Gordon is not there yet, and he’s been injured a chunk of the last two seasons, which makes reaching a deal a little difficult. While David Stern (the ultimate decision maker since the league owns the Hornets right now) gave approval to offer Gordon a four-year deal, whatever that offer was did not impress Gordon.

Gordon released a statement about that Thursday which can be taken as a little testy.

“We all worked hard on the extension, but sometimes business is business. Right now my sole focus is on staying in great shape, and making sure I get back to 100 percent health as quickly as possible, so I can return to playing and helping my teammates and Coach Monty win games. That is really what it is all about right now for me.”

The team released a statement as well, through GM Dell Demps.

“We made good faith and amicable efforts to reach an agreement on a contract extension over the past few days. Unfortunately, although close, we did not reach an agreement. Eric will be a restricted free agent this summer and we are optimistic and encouraged with the opportunity to sign Eric to a contract that will make him a member of the Hornets organization and community for years to come.”

Gordon is now a restricted free agent this summer and the market will set his value. Some teams, including his hometown Indiana Pacers, may make a run at him. Then the Hornets will have the option of matching any deal. They can decide if he is worth what is offered or not. The real question in New Orleans is who will make that decision in July — will it still be David Stern, or will there be a new owner by then? And how much would a new owner be willing to spend?