David Stern doesn’t see what the big deal is about players leaving their teams

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In an interview with the Orlando Sentinel, David Stern put on the old jousting tights and once again decided to do a little dance around the media. In a wide ranging interview, Stern discussed his relationship with ownership, old and new, the effect of the lockout on injuries (surprise, he says there isn’t one), and most notably, the “trend” of players leaving small markets for larger ones. Stern, for his part, focuses in on Miami, and assert it isn’t a market issue, it’s a sunshine issue. Really. And that Orlando is a big market. Really.

Orlando Sentinel: When I asked you on Christmas night in Oklahoma City how you wanted the Dwight Howard situation to play out, you said, basically, that players who had put in their time in the league have the right to play where they want. They’ve earned the right to become free agents. But lets say Howard does leave Orlando for a larger market. Are you concerned that there will be a perception in small- and medium-sized markets that the teams there will not be able to hold onto their stars?

David Stern: Only to the extent that theyre fed by journalists like you. I dont remember Miami ever being referred to as a “large market.” Do you?

OS: No.

Stern: Stop right there, then. But, now, because a couple of players decided to go where the sun shines, thats now a large market. Well, guess what: Orlando, to my mind, is a large market even though you refer to it as a “small market.” Its up there in the top 10 in revenues. It has actually pretty much close to the same sunshine that Miami has, and its a preferred place for so many people to live in the middle of their careers and after their careers are over. So I think theres a small-market sort of point of view sometimes that people have a defensiveness [about]. But, to me, Orlandos a great market, and it seems to be a great place to live.

OS: With Chris Paul going from New Orleans to Los Angeles, do you not see a trend? And Carmelo [Anthony] going from Denver to New York?

Stern: Well see. But the one thing I can say to you is that the new collective bargaining agreement will speak to that with each passing year more forcefully, because what I also said to you when last we met was that as the new tax levels become effective, there will be a limitation on what any team can add. And those levels actually will hit small- and large-market teams alike, because the question is not the size of your market. Its going to be the size of your payroll.

via NBA David Stern: NBA Commissioner David Stern discusses Dwight Howard, the new collective bargaining agreement and his future in an exclusive interview – OrlandoSentinel.com.

So if Orlando is the same or better market size than Miami (and it is, by most metric counts), and has the same advantages, what is Stern pinning the failures of Orlando to keep its stars on?

But let’s leave that one.

Stern’s a cage fighter and just when you think you have him, he’s not only not in the corner anymore, he’s behind you and you’re feeling an odd feeling dripping down your leg.

It’s interesting to see him in the course of answering the same series of questions deny that there is a problem, and state that the problem, which doesn’t exist, mind you, is resolved by the new CBA. They approved a new CBA and Chris Paul wound up in Los Angeles. Dwight Howard is, in all likelihood, going to be in Los Angeles or Brooklyn next year (outside shot at Dallas, you know, that small township that Dallas is). But what may be more stunning is not just his verbal gymnastics, but the fact that after the lockout and everything we’ve learned… I agree with him.

After years of feeling that small markets were at as structural disadvantage, it’s become clear that there is an inherent disadvantage in the perception of these cities. 18-26 year-old NBA athletes don’t find Milwaukee or Orlando or Utah “cool.” L.A. is cool. New York is cool. Chicago is cool. And while these players want to win, the ability of those cities to draw other great players based on those advantages provides the excuse needed to buy into living somewhere nicer. Maybe Oklahoma City is providing a counter to that. But the fact that Stern is able to justifiably pull that there is nothing flawed in a system where Orlando is set to lose two franchise players in under 15 years is going to be an issue in this league, unless the tax escalations coming actually do have the intended effect. Until then, it’ll be Stern, sticking and moving his way through the same question with nary a blow taken.

The Sentinel does a good job of pursuit, though, and the interview is well worth the read.

J.R. Smith gets shirtless as Browns win first game since 2016 (VIDEO)

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LeBron James may be a Los Angeles Laker now, but JR Smith is still with the Cleveland Cavaliers. Media day is right around the corner, and so NBA players are trickling in to their respective cities from their offseason locations.

Thankfully for us, Smith is already in Cleveland.

On Thursday night, the Cleveland Browns of the NFL won their first regular season game since Dec. 24, 2016. In attendance was none other than Smith, and lo and behold he was once again shirtless.

Just the way we like him.

Via Twitter:

Smith was famously shirtless in 2016 during the Cavaliers’ championship parade (and seemingly for much of that summer) after they beat the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals. Someone even printed out a shirt you could wear that turned you into a shirtless JR.

There probably won’t be much celebrating in Cleveland for Smith this season, and therefore not many reasons for him to get shirtless on everyone. The Browns winning a Thursday night game seems like an appropriate arena for this type of thing now.

Stephen Curry, Chris Paul, John Wall team up for Hurricane Florence relief

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Along with Michael Jordan, several other NBA players, teams, and the league have decided to team up in the wake of Hurricane Florence. Relief for the eastern seaboard, specifically the Carolinas, has been the subject of many charitable efforts thus far.

Now we can add Chris Paul, John Wall, and Stephen Curry to the list of players trying to help the beleaguered coastal states.

All three players are natives of North Carolina, with Curry being from Charlotte, Wall being from Raleigh and Paul being from Winston-Salem. The three are the public face of an effort to raise $500,000 to help aid in post-hurricane relief.

Via Twitter:

The damage from Florence has been significant. According to one report from NBC News, home losses in the town of New Bern, NC (pop: 30,101) have reached an estimated $32 million.

Moody’s Analytics released a report that said that a conservative estimate of total damage caused by Florence is in the range of $17 billion.

Video from the North Carolina Department of Transportation published on social media this week confirmed how great the flooding was just in terms of visual scale.

If you’d like to help donate to the effort, you can do so by clicking the link in Curry’s tweet or following the link here.

Richard Jefferson’s father killed in drive-by shooting in Los Angeles

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Richard Jefferson Sr., 65, the father of NBA veteran Richard Jefferson Jr., died on Wednesday when he was killed in a drive-by shooting in Los Angeles.

The report comes to us from TMZ, who says that it is still unclear whether the elder Jefferson was the target of the attack or if it was something more random.

Via TMZ:

Richard Jefferson Sr. was in front of a liquor store in a primarily residential area around 6:52 PM when a vehicle rolled up and someone inside opened fire.

Jefferson Sr. was struck multiple times in the torso. He was transported to a nearby hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Sources say Jefferson Sr. was with 2 other men at the time of the shooting. It’s unclear if Jefferson Sr. was the target.

The Los Angeles Police Department is still investigating the shooting, and we of course are hoping they will get to the bottom of this crime.

Thoughts are with Jefferson at this time, who according to ESPN grew closer to his father in recent years. Jefferson’s parents split when he was young and Junior grew up in Arizona with Senior residing in California.

Knicks won’t rush Kristaps Porzingis or future building plans

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NEW YORK (AP) — Kristaps Porzingis is back with his teammates, though the New York Knicks don’t know when he’ll be back on the court.

Joakim Noah won’t be back, though the terms of his departure still are being negotiated.

So while there are questions, the Knicks also feel they have certainty with the way they are building their team.

They insist their future first-round draft picks will be used to select players for their own team, not to be dangled in trades that could land them an established player.

“We’re committed to following a plan and not just shifting and pivoting because we see something that we think is attractive and might fast track something,” Knicks president Steve Mills said Thursday. “I’ve seen that happen and go wrong too many times and that’s not what we’re going to do.”

It’s happened in New York, where the Knicks traded young players and future assets in 2011 to acquire Carmelo Anthony, rather than sign him the following summer as a free agent with the cap space they had. This time, they say they will wait for the summer of 2019, when Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler, Kevin Durant and Kawhi Leonard could be among the free agents – even if one of them suddenly became available by trade now.

“We don’t want to jump at the shiny things,” coach David Fizdale said. “We want to make solid decisions and be patient with this process.”

They will be patient with Porzingis, their All-Star forward who is still recovering from a torn ACL in February. He is back in New York and working out with his teammates, but faces more testing and rehab before the Knicks know when he can play.

“As he meets certain milestones, we’ll continue his rehab process,” Mills said, “all toward the direction of when he feels 100 percent comfortable and we feel 100 percent comfortable that we’re not taking any risks with him, then he’ll be ready to come back.”

Not so for Noah, despite the two years left on the $72 million deal he signed in 2015. He has been away from the team since clashing with former coach Jeff Hornacek last season. The Knicks remain in discussions with Noah and his representation to determine how he’ll leave the club.

“The hope is that we can come to a resolution that is both advantageous to both Joakim and to the Knicks, and so that’s where it sits right now,” general manager Scott Perry said.

Porzingis is eligible for an extension this fall, but the Knicks seem prepared to wait until next summer. That would allow them to have more salary-cap space in July if they try to sign a player they won’t mortgage any of their future for now.

“We feel comfortable with our organization and where we’re going and what we’re developing here,” Mills said, “and we think that when it’s time for us to go after free agents, we’ll be a place to attract free agents and we shouldn’t use our draft picks like that.”