Sixers beat Pacers… can Philly win the Atlantic division?

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We’re only eight games into the season — about 12 percent of the way —so drawing broad conclusions is tough. But it was hard not to look at a couple games Monday night and not have one particular question pop up.

The game first was the 76ers taking on the Indiana Pacers, two of the rising teams in the East. Indiana was without Danny Granger and the entire game had the sloppy feel of so many early season contests this year, but the 76ers controlled most of the second half and won handily, 96-86. They looked pretty good doing it, with quality offensive looks and solid defense —they looked like a team that could be dangerous as the season wears on.

Next the New York Knicks needed a whole lot of Carmelo Anthony and a few breaks down the stretch to beat the struggling Charlotte Bobcats.

Taken together it was hard not to wonder — can Philadelphia win the Atlantic division over New York and Boston?

Maybe. Before the season that seemed a real long shot, but now… they look as good as anyone else. If not better. As of Tuesday Philadelphia at 6-2 is a game and a half ahead of 5-4 New York and two games ahead of 4-4 Boston.

More than that, Boston and New York have really struggled at moments this season. The Knicks look like mismatched pieces not fitting a system, the Celtics look old at times and not as deep a team as they were.

Philadelphia looks solid. Especially on defense. They came into the game allowing just 90.2 points per 100 possessions, best in the NBA. The Pacers scored at a 92.3 points per 100 pace in this game. They do it by not letting the other team shoot well or get into their offense and that happened to a Pacers team that has previously looked good this season. The Pacers shot just 36.6 percent, with David West going 6-for-14 and Darren Collison 2-of-11.

On offense, the 76ers are looking to get out and run a little more, which suits them. If they get some easy buckets to go with that defense, it works. Andre Iguodala is looking more to facilitate, driving to draw the defense then kicking out for assists when the defense collapsed. Iggy had 20 points and nine rebounds to go with five assists.

Philly also got good play from their role players. When Spencer Hawes got in foul trouble trying to deal with Roy Hibbert, rookie Nikola Vucevic came in with 11 points and eight rebounds.

The Pacers will have better nights. They had strength inside but when the Sixers defense collapsed the Pacers didn’t make them pay on the kickouts, shooting just 4-of-13 from three. Hibbert finished with 19 points on 12 shots.

The Pacers were more balanced, with Lou Williams having 13 off the bench and six players in double figures.

We will have to see if Philly can keep up this level of defense for an entire season, how they deal with adversity when it eventually arrives as it does for all teams. But right now, eight games in, they look as good or better than anyone in the Atlantic division.

Some owners reportedly want access to mental health files of players

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If you read one thing NBA related today, it should be the first installment of Jackie MacMullan’s brilliant series at ESPN on the mental health of players and staffs in the NBA, and how the league is handling it. MacMullan not only got Kevin Love and Paul Pierce to open up about their challenges, but she also got into the challenges the league faces in confronting this issue head-on.

One such challenge: Owners wanting access to players mental health “files.”

NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, players union executive director Michelle Roberts and their respective teams are reportedly working on a new mental health policy for the league. Privacy is going to be a big part of that. From MacMullan:

Yet there remain many obstacles to confront, chief among them the stigma attached to mental health that prompts many players to suffer in silence. The union also insists that mental health treatment be confidential, but some NBA owners, who in some cases are paying their players hundreds of millions of dollars, want access to the files of their “investments.” That is not, however, the league’s position. “The NBA fully supports protecting the confidentiality of players’ mental health information and, accordingly, committed to the players association that any mental health program we undertake would do so,” NBA spokesman Mike Bass says.

Confidentiality, says Love, has to be non-negotiable. Without it, he says, he never would have become comfortable enough to announce from that All-Star dais that he was seeking treatment.

Those files must be private. This is different from a torn knee ligament or sprained ankle (and on those we have HIPPA laws for good reason). For one, this is something more unpredictable in treating. Second, it comes back to the stigma of mental health issues and how the information about them might be used.

That stigma still exists, both in society and the NBA — McMullan gets into the players and their wives talking behind Love’s back All-Star weekend, and the players currently seeking treatment who do not want it public. The “real men don’t talk about this” mentality is everywhere, but it has fertile ground in professional sports locker rooms where players see themselves as invincible.

That mentality, that stigma will be the hardest thing to change in altering the culture of mental health issues in the NBA. There are no easy answers here. Does anyone think the owners who want access to those files wouldn’t use against the player in negotiations (never underestimate an owner’s effort to gain leverage)?

The players’ union will not allow that in whatever the framework is for the leagues’ new mental health policy. Nor should they.

Love, DeMar DeRozan, Royce White and others broke barriers stepping forward into the spotlight to discuss their challenges. But there are a lot of barriers still up, and a lot of work for both the NBA and society to do on this front. And privacy must be part of that.

Rebuilding Hawks add depth by signing Daniel Hamilton, Alex Poythress.

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ATLANTA (AP) — The rebuilding Atlanta Hawks have added depth by signing guard-forward Daniel Hamilton and forward Alex Poythress.

Poythress was signed to a two-way contract, so the former Kentucky player will split his time with the Hawks’ G League Erie team.

Hamilton is on a fully guaranteed one-year contract after impressing the Hawks playing for the Thunder Summer League team. He averaged 2 points in six games with Oklahoma City last season while on a two-way contract with the Thunder. He spent most of the season with the G League Oklahoma City Blue.

Poythress averaged 1 point in 25 games with Indiana last season. He began the season on a two-way contract.

 

Lance Stephenson on why he blew in LeBron’s ear: “I was really trying to get him mad”

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Lance Stephenson and LeBron James are teammates with the Lakers.

It’s not something anyone would have seen coming back in 2014 when Stephenson blew in LeBron’s ear, creating a meme for the ages and adding to the legend of Stephenson. From the moment it happened, people have asked: “What was Stephenson thinking?”

“I was really trying to get him mad, really trying to win the game, get him unfocused,” Stephenson told The Score in an interview (video above). “And I was trying anything, and for you to do something to somebody and they don’t respond, they keep continuing playing hard, it’s like: ‘yo, how do I…’ I was just trying to find stuff… LeBron was such a good player, you know, I was trying to do anything to get him frustrated. It’s going to be different, being friends with LeBron, you know what I mean?”

We do, because Stephenson did other stuff over the years, like tap LeBron on the face, trash talk LeBron, and kicking him in the “groin,” and those antics occasionally worked.

LeBron has said before he could put that behind him and play with Stephenson, but of all the signings the Lakers made this summer this was the one that left people around the league scratching their heads. In part because of the history between the two, but more because of Stephenson’s history outside of Indiana — he’s struggled. Badly. Now he’s going to be put in a tight role on a team with high expectations and ridiculous levels of scrutiny. Is this really going to work?

It’s just a one-year deal, the Lakers set themselves up to chase another star (via trade or free agency) and that remains the priority. Everything else is just window dressing. But man, there could be quite a show in that window with the Lakers this season, that’s a lot of big personalities in one space.

 

Nuggets rookie Michael Porter Jr. guesses Vince Carter’s first NBA season was in 1987 (video)

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Nuggets rookie Michael Porter Jr. insisted he meant no disrespect to Luka Doncic after liking an Instagram comment that called the Mavericks rookie overrated.

But this is darn sure disrespectful toward Vince Carter.

Alex Kennedy of HoopsHype:

Carter – who signed with the Hawks for next season – entered the NBA in 1998. He’s old, but he’s not that old.