Baseline to baseline recaps: Celtics fall, Knicks fall, Heat almost join them

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What you missed while worried about what a bad year this was for elephants

Oklahoma City 98, Memphis 95: This playoff rematch was our game of the night.

New Orleans 97, Celtics 78: Don’t hit the panic button yet, Celtics fans. Still too early. But if you want to feel uncomfortable and a little ill, go ahead. You are 0-3 on the season. On the second game of a back-to-back (and third game in four nights) the Celtics looked old and slow. And unmotivated. They had given a lot the night before in a comeback and moral victory against the Heat and looked like they had nothing left. For the third straight game they were down double digits in the second quarter and could never really crawl back.

The only bright spot was backup center Greg Stiemsma who had six blocks. Of course, he was getting run because Jermaine O’Neal was awful (1-of-6 shooting).

The Hornets played hard and looked good — and were without Eric Gordon. Jarrett Jack sliced and diced the once feared Celtics defense for 21, Carl Landry added 20 and 11 with his usual efficiency. Credit coach Monty Williams, he has this team playing hard and playing smart defense — and they are now 2-0. Thank you very much.

Heat 96, Bobcats 95: Charlotte jumped out to a fast 11-0 run, hitting their shots which let them get back on defense and get set, slowing the running onslaught the Heat try to bring. The Bobcats basically forsook offensive rebounding to get back on defense. Miami looked a little dead-legged on a back-to-back. Miami’s entire system is based on defense and the Bobcats put up 60 points in the first half.

Miami charged back from 15 down in the third behind 12 points in the quarter from LeBron James, then Chris Bosh had the momentum in the fourth. Dwyane Wade was out with a foot injury (a contusion) for most of the third but came back and hit the game winner, a little bank with 2.9 seconds left. Not a great game by Miami, but they escape with the win and a few impressive highlights.

Warriors 92, Knicks 78: Golden State had to play without Stephen Curry, meaning the Knicks could exploit the point guard matchup… oh, yea, Mike Bibby was back, so I guess not. This was not a good night for the Knick shooters — Carmelo Anthony 3-of-13, Amare Stoudemire 5-of-15 and as a team the Knicks shoot 40 percent. Tyson Chandler had two points, three rebounds, zero blocks and five fouls.

The Warriors dominated the second half, particularly the start of the fourth quarter, to pull away for the win. Monta Ellis had 22 points but needed 22 shots to get there. Brandon Rush looked good with 19 points on 7-of-13 shooting. Kwame Brown had five offensive rebounds (not Chandler’s best night, as we mentioned). As a team the Warriors shot a pedestrian 45.5 percent but that was good enough.

Pacers 90, Raptors 85: Toronto had 11 points in the first quarter (total!) and shot 39.5 percent for the first half — and they were the better shooting team. This game was filled with some post-lockout slop. .DeMar DeRozan had zero first half points but had 16 in the fourth, but it was not enough against the balance of the Pacers starters. Danny Granger had nine points in the fourth quarter alone including some key threes, and David West hit key buckets late.

Hawks 101, Wizards 83: Two wins in two nights for the Hawks, maybe not against the best competition but they are beating the teams they are supposed to. That said, 46 of their 75 shots (61.3 percent) came from beyond 16 feet — that is not a sustainable way to win. Nick Young had 21 and John Wall had 20 but nobody on the Wizards impressed, that is not a very good team.

Cavaliers 105, Pistons 89: After an ugly NBA debut, top pick Kyrie Irving looked good, not only scoring (14 points) but he was an impressive playmaker, seeming to make the smart play every time down. Samardo Samuels (17) led six Cavs in double figures scoring. Cleveland also owned the offensive glass in this one.

Spurs 115, Clippers 90: I love watching the Clippers play but I’ve said this from the start about them as a power in the West — I need to see them play good consistent defense before I totally buy in. The Spurs shot 56.3 percent on the night and were 10-of-19 from three as a team. It was vintage Manu Ginobili as he sliced and diced the Clippers for 24 points. DeJuan Blair had 20 points and dominated the heralded Clipper front line.

Sixers 103, Suns 83: There is something very wrong with the Suns offense — Steve Nash finished with four points, one assist and six turnovers in just 17 minutes. Yikes. Philly looked good again with a balanced attack — Jrue Holiday, Andre Iguodala and Thaddeus Young all had 15 points. Holiday left at the end after banging his knee but said post game it was not serious, he could have returned if he were needed.

Nuggets 117, Jazz 100: Two games, two impressive wins for the Nuggets. Nene had 25 points, seven rebounds, three steals and two blocks to lead the way. Two games, two ugly losses for the Jazz. In both cases, we may be seeing a trend here.

J.R. Smith reportedly met with Bucks Thursday to talk about contract

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After five seasons in Cleveland, the Cavaliers waived J.R. Smith. The 34-year-old veteran wing is not part of the Cavaliers future, and by waiving him before the guarantee date they only had to pay him $4.4 million of this $15.7 million salary.

That makes Smith a free agent.

He sat down with the Bucks on Thursday, according to Shams Charania of The Athletic.

The Bucks can only offer minimum contracts at this point.

Smith will turn 34 before next season starts and his skills are in decline, he shot just 30.8 percent from three last season. The Bucks will likely start Khris Middleton and Wesley Matthews on the wing with Sterling Brown, Pat Connaughton, and Donte DiVincenzo behind them. They have the roster spot to make the addition. The questions are does Smith fit, does he want the small role that’s really available, and how often will he wear a shirt around the facility?

Mark Cuban says NBA player movement reflects job market across many industries

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It’s a question that came up a lot in the wake of a wild summer where eight of the 24 players in the All-Star Game just last February ended up on new teams:

Is all this player movement good for the NBA?

It got asked everywhere from the league’s headquarters to your local bar, from sports talk radio shows to the NBA’s owners meeting in Las Vegas. There’s no easy answer to that. However, the divide seems to be somewhat generational — older fans miss the stability of knowing their stars would be there next year, young fans like the volatility and fast-changing landscape.

Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban had an interesting perspective on all this: What you see in the NBA is what you see in almost every industry now. From Cuban’s blogmaverick.com:

Some feel that the player movement we have seen, particularly players asking to be traded or leaving teams that have the ability to pay them more money is a problem. I don’t. I think it is exactly what we should expect and it reflects what is happening in the job market across industries in our country.

No longer do college students graduate in search of a career where they expect to spend their entire adult lives working for a single company. Just the thought is crazy. I tell college graduates to look for a job where they get to learn about themselves, the business world, adulting and what they love to do and can be good at it. That their first job is just that, their first job. There will be many more…

Your best of the best will be impactful not only within the company, but via social media and other online platforms, visible as the best in their industry. It is important to give them reasons to want to stay. Great employees are effectively always free agents with the ability to move anywhere.

Why should it be any different for the NBA?

It’s interesting to hear from an owner (guys who traditionally want to control the workers). From a player’s perspective, this makes a lot of sense (and Cuban is as player-friendly an owner as the league has).

In a lot of ways, what bothers fans really applies to only the elite players, the guys with leverage, the guys who change the course of a franchise. If Paul George wants out of his contract, the reaction of Thunder management and fans would be different from if Dennis Schroder tried that kind of power move.

However, does this player movement erode the traditional fan base? Fans in Dallas/Miami/Boston/Los Angeles/everywhere want to identify with players, not just the logo across their chest. If the star players are changing teams more often how does that impact that traditional fandom? Do younger players become fans of players more: A LeBron James fan, a Stephen Curry fan, a James Harden fan, and their loyalties follow the player not the franchise? We seem to have more of that with Lebron and Curry. Cuban worked hard to make sure Dirk Nowitzki never left Dallas. (Going back there was a split between Lakers fans and Kobe fans, it’s just their interests largely always aligned.)

Which leads to the original, key question: Is all this player movement good for NBA business?

For the league and owners, the real question is will the undeniable social media buzz of the NBA offseason lead to increased ticket sales, increased viewership (or at least stopping that decline), more purchasing of League Pass packages (in whatever form), more jersey sales and all the rest of it? Can the league monetize this buzz?

Nobody has the answer to that, in part because how we as a nation (and world) consume media is changing so fast. What will the viewing landscape for the NBA’s television and streaming deals look like in 2024? 2029? Nobody knows.

Which means predicting how this player movement impacts the NBA is an unknown.

All the movement is creating a lot of buzz, which is nice, but buzz will not pay the NBA’s bills.

Damian Lillard on shot to beat Thunder: ‘That was for Seattle’

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Damian Lillard is a legend in Portland. He’s a legend in Oakland.

And now he’ll be a legend in Seattle.

The Trail Blazers star’s buzzer-beating 3-pointer wave goodbye ended the season for the Thunder, who moved to Oklahoma City from Seattle 12 years ago.

Lillard on Sports Business Radio Podcast:

What can I say? That was for Seattle.

Just when I thought Lillard’s shot and celebration were as cold as could be.

Clippers executive Jerry West: ‘I’ve never been around any organization that is better than this one’

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Jerry West played 14 years for the Lakers, making the All-Star game every year and winning a championship in a Hall of Fame career. He coached the Lakers to a few playoff seasons. Then, he ran the Lakers’ front office for 18 years, winning five titles and setting the stage for several more by acquiring Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant.

Now, West works for Clippers owner Steve Ballmer.

West on The Dan Patrick Show:

Steve Ballmer has really put together an unbelievably terrific organization. He’s spared no expense. It’s a really fun place to be. There’s not ego-driven at all. It’s just a fun place to be, and he’s got an awful lot of basketball people over there.

He’s just a great owner and one of the nicest men I’ve ever been around in my life. I’ve never seen a person like this with his success. It’s just remarkable how even-keeled he is. If people knew how philanthropic he was. He keeps all that stuff quiet. I guess he’ll get mad at me for mentioning it. But he’s just a remarkable man himself.

People always ask me what he’s like. And I say he’s just like you and I, normal. I’ve never seen – he’s willing to spend on players. He’s willing to spend on personnel within the front office. And as I mentioned before, I’ve never been around any organization that is better than this one. That’s for sure.

Maybe West is bitter at the Lakers. Maybe West is just gushing about his current boss, because that’s who pays him now.

But the wider respect held for the Clippers is evident in Kawhi Leonard and Paul George picking them without the team first getting an incumbent star. That says a lot about the organization, one that Ballmer has put his stamp on.

This also feels like a shot at the Lakers, whether or not West intended it. Many consider them to be the NBA’s golden franchise.

But their operations have had no shortage of problems lately.

The Lakers would have a stronger relative case further back, when West worked for them. However, organizations generally run better now. The league is more advanced. Maybe West is considering that.

Biases aside, his endorsement of the Clippers might be accurate.

West also worked for the Grizzlies.