Blazers’ Allen talks openly about being small market owner

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Paul Allen got painted as the bad guy this summer, fair or not.

But to his credit, when he sat down with reporters Monday he was honest — he was a hardliner. Which is ironic as the Blazers were one of the bigger spending small markets of the last couple decades.

Portland followed the pattern of most smaller markets — they kept costs down until they became competitive and had a window to win a ring, then they spent like the big markets. Blazers people will say that Allen lost money all those years (decide for yourself if you want to believe that, the co-founder of Microsoft can certainly afford it either way) but he admits now he didn’t like that pattern he wanted to change the economic landscape of the NBA.

Here are his quotes, from the Portland Tribune (via TrueHoop).

“The quandary you get into in a small market is, you have a choice between being competitive and maybe overspending, or not trying to be competitive and trying to break even,” he said. “That became very dramatic with some teams. We were starting to see some teams say, ‘We’re not going to be competitive, because it costs too much money, and we’re losing too much money.’

“Even the mid-market teams like, say, Dallas … they won the NBA championship but were way over the luxury tax and lost a lot of money. It was clear that not only did you have to stop the small-market teams from collectively losing a lot of money, but you had to try to level the playing field.”

Allen also said he has no plans to sell the team right now and that he does not plan to make ventures into the luxury cap territory again.

Go read the whole article — he also talks about the Blazers revolving door at general manager. I don’t agree with everything Allen said, but at least he came out and said it, unlike other hardline owners who hid behind David Stern.