It was players’ idea to decertify, but did they really understand?

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How did this all go down? How did a Monday meeting where the union representatives were expected to reject the latest offer from the owners and make a counter proposal turn into dissolving the entire union and likely blowing up the NBA season with it?

The whole idea came from the players… well, if you think the players sit around and discuss the merits of different tactics of NBA labor law. So maybe we should look to the agents, except they are not thrilled with this move. Billy Hunter said did not come from union leadership. But while nobody will take credit, everybody had a hand in it at some level.

In the end, it comes back to the players. It’s their union. And this is how athletes react — they are competitive and will fight to win. They can make emotional decisions about winning that may not play out well in board rooms. They’ve been losing the negotiations so they responded in the most aggressive way they could. They took out the biggest club in their bag, even if this was not the best play at the time. And now here we are, staring at a lost season.

Here is what happened in Monday’s NBPA meeting, as reported by Ken Berger at CBSSports.com.

As Hunter described, union officials explained the owners’ proposal, which would’ve been replaced by a far worse one if the players didn’t accept it. He then laid out the options: present it to the full body for a vote; reject it; make a counterproposal; or give the NBPA the authority to “do whatever they deem necessary and appropriate going forward,” Hunter said.

“And then all of a sudden, the players said, ‘No, we want to talk about decertification or disclaimer,’ ” Hunter said. “So it actually came from the floor. And when it came from the floor, then that’s when we began to engage on the issue….

Players are not stupid and they understood the basic idea here, but did they really think through all the consequences? It’s hard to see enough guys getting behind this without a push from their agents, some of whom wanted to decertify July 1. That said, agents had been pushing for a player-led decertification effort that would have taken at least another 45 days (leaving time for negotiations). The disclaimer method — essentially the union disavowing the players — is much faster but much riskier. It’s not a move most agents wanted.

The decision to disclaim, announced after the nearly four-hour player meeting, stunned even those agents who had been clamoring for the players to decertify for months. Agents held a conference call late Monday afternoon, and according to a person who was briefed on it, hardly any of them were happy with the path the union chose….

“This is honestly the last thing I would’ve done,” one moderate agent said of the union’s disclaimer. “I can’t imagine these [players] truly know what they’ve gotten themselves into. … I don’t know an agent, including the decert agents, who are happy with this move.”

Did the players really get the consequences, that this may well have cost the NBA an entire season? And over what? Full mid-level exceptions for the seven teams playing the tax every season and to eliminate the repeater tax hikes for those teams? I get they players want a system that allows them more freedom of movement, but they got painted into a corner by Stern and rather than throwing the ball back in his court (with a counter proposal) they blew up the entire season. Stern gets to win the PR game again.

Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo pulled no punches on what he thought happened.

Too many of the player reps didn’t know the difference between a disclaimer of interest, decertification and “Dancing with the Stars” when they walked into that meeting. As it usually goes in these labor talks, whoever gets the players’ ears last can talk them in and out of almost any directive. The agents were locked out, cell phones confiscated at the door, and Hunter had a captive audience with some big fancy antitrust lawyers to make his case. Too many of those player reps are young kids who were given the task as a locker-room punishment, or older guys looking for the free annual meeting in the Caribbean.

Before they went this route, the NBA players should have talked to their NHL brethren and asked if losing a season was worth it, or if those guys regret the lost chances and lost salary more? It doesn’t feel like this strategy was really thought out all the way around the block.

Report: Rajon Rondo’s girlfriend confronted Chris Paul’s wife in stands after on-court fight

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The longstanding tension between Rajon Rondo and Chris Paul boiled over with a fight during Saturday’s Rockets-Lakers game, including Rondo spitting on Paul.

The animosity apparently extended even further.

Sam Amick of The Athletic:

A heated Paul told teammates and coaches in the locker room afterward that Rondo’s girlfriend had sparked a verbal confrontation with Chris’ wife in the stands, according to sources.

Jonatan Feigen of the Houston Chronicle:

Lauren A. Jones of the Los Angeles Sentinel:

One person could see a shove when another person sees someone getting in someone’s face. There’s a fine line amidst chaos.

If Paul wasn’t talking about a shove after the game, I tend to think there wasn’t one.

Still, a verbal altercation alone is a lot here.

Sixers play ‘Mo Bamba’ song after Joel Embiid dunks on Magic rookie (VIDEO)

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No one will ever claim that Joel Embiid doesn’t have fun while playing the game of basketball. The Philadelphia 76ers big man is a world-class follow on various social media platforms, and has a keen sense of humor.

Perhaps that is what led to the Sixers sound crew playing a very specific song after Embiid dunked on Orlando Magic rookie big man Mo Bamba this week.

On Saturday, Embiid gave Bamba a little jab step drive to the left side of the baseline, finishing with a dunk as the rookie recovered. Game Operations in Philadelphia immediately played a song titled “Mo Bamba” by rapper Sheck Wes.

Via Twitter:

Embiid used to be the young gun on the block, but he is now moving into veteran territory and his propensity for snark will only become more biting as his skills improve.

Who knows if Embiid had a hand in arranging this audio cue, but whoever was responsible deserved a slap on the back.

Kemba Walker sets NBA record with 19 made 3-pointers in first three games

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MIAMI (AP) There was a stretch last season spanning four games when Charlotte’s Kemba Walker missed 16 consecutive attempts from 3-point range.

That seems unfathomable now.

Walker might have been the surprise of the NBA’s first week by averaging 35.3 points per game, a big number fueled by making 19 shots from 3-point range – more than any player in the league has connected on in the first three games of a season. So in a year when Walker insists he won’t be speaking about his looming free agency, his numbers are doing plenty of talking.

“I always felt that I’ve been always put under the radar,” Walker said. “Underrated, of course.”

That might be changing.

Walker understands there’s a direct correlation between stardom and winning. He’s been an All-Star, he’s probably going to get a monster contract next summer, he played in two NCAA Final Fours at Connecticut and led the Huskies to the 2011 national championship. But if he’s going to reach the level of NBA respect that he’s perpetually seeking, it’s going to take more than 3s.

He’s going to need W’s as well. Walker has played in 537 games with the Hornets, and his team has won only 211 of them. That’s not all his fault, not even close, but Charlotte needs to be better if Walker’s stock is going to soar to that super-elite level.

“It comes with wins,” Walker said. “I know I’m in a small market and things like that, but at the end of the day, I just go out there and I try to do what I need to do to win. That’s really it.”

So far, so good.

The Hornets are 2-1 after an eventful stretch to start the season – rallying from 20 points down only to lose by one to Milwaukee, rolling past Orlando by 32 and then wasting a 26-point lead before hanging on to beat Miami by one point Saturday night. Walker delivered the game winner against the Heat, getting a foul call with a half-second left and making a free throw for a 113-112 victory.

“Our team starts with him,” Hornets coach James Borrego said. “He controls the game, but he also understands that he needs trust in his teammates. When he misses a shot, I want him to take the next one.”

That’s been the message Borrego has been hammering into Walker’s mind for weeks.

That’s also been part of the teachings of Walker’s new backup.

Tony Parker‘s influence on Walker cannot be underestimated. Parker won four NBA championships with San Antonio before signing with the Hornets this summer, and he has been part of more wins – 1,001 and counting, including playoffs – than all but six other players in league history. Having Borrego telling him to shoot more, having Parker offering him a different view of the point guard position, it’s all played a role in Walker’s confidence soaring.

“Tony’s helping me read the game in a whole different light,” Walker said. “What to look for, what not to, he’s amazing with that kind of stuff. It’s an honor to have him around.”

The Hornets are 2-0 so far on their current four-game road trip, the first time they’ve started a multigame swing away from home with consecutive victories in two years. They go to Toronto on Monday, and Walker says his approach for that game and every other that awaits this season won’t deviate much.

“Just go out there and leave it all on the court,” Walker said. “That’s all I’m trying to do. And I think that’s where the respect comes from, the way I play each and every night. That’s my number one goal, regardless of if I have zero or if I have 30, I’m going to go out there and leave it all on the floor.”

More AP NBA: http://www.apnews.com/tag/NBA and http://www.twitter.com/AP-Sports

Three Things to Know: Trae Young is legit, people. Just ask the Cavaliers.

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Luka who? Trae Young blows up with 35 points, 11 assists. Fun bit of trivia courtesy Ben Golliver of Sports Illustrated: Since 2000, name the two rookies who have put up at least 35 points and 10 assists in a game. Answer: Stephen Curry and LeBron James.

Now, add Atlanta’s Trae Young to the list. He dropped 35 points and 11 assists on the Cavaliers to get the Hawks a win (and Lloyd Pierce his first W as an NBA coach).

After a “meh” game against the Knicks to open the season then a solid one against the Grizzlies, Young lit up the Cavaliers (and torched their rookie point guard Colin Sexton). Young has shown an impressive catch-and-shoot touch already, but Sunday night he showed off what a threat he can be using the pick-and-roll. Young used his impressive handles to create space for his shot, or to get into the lane and then create for others. More than just scoring, he’s showing an ability to command the game, which is impressive for a one-and-done rookie.

It’s early, and Young is going to have a lot more ups and downs his rookie season, but this was a promising outing. Young and the Hawks have a soft opening to the season on the schedule and it will give him a chance to gain some confidence early.

Next up is the rookie showdown with Dallas and one Luka Doncic (the guy he will forever be linked to because of the draft night trade, fair or not). They won’t be matched up on one another, and it’s too early to draw genuine comparisons, but it’s worth watching.

2) Russell Westbrook is back, put up a near triple-double, and even that couldn’t get the Thunder a win. Everyone tuned into this game expecting one thing: Iman Shumpert to go off and score 26 points and leading the Kings to a win. Am I right?

Westbrook, in his first game back since having surgery to clean up his knee in the offseason, scored 32 points, and 12 rebounds and eight assists, and shot 13-of-23 overall — a very Westbrook night. While there were a few moments of rust, he looked like vintage Westbrook.

OKC still lost, at home, to the Kings, 131-120.

The Thunder are off to a 0-3 start and there are two key reasons why. One is that they cannot knock down threes — they were 9-of-39 against the Kings (23.1 percent) and on the season are shooting 23.9 percent from deep (worst in the NBA). They are taking more threes than a season ago (36.3 a game, top 10 in attempts in the league) but the shots just aren’t falling. The Thunder were not a prolific three-point shooting team last season, but they hit 35.4 percent and their shooting should improve this season.

The second, and larger, issue is their defense has been average, and at times awful. They struggled to slow the Kings, who put up 34 points in three of the four quarters, and on the season the Thunder are allowing 110.5 points per 100 possessions, which is middle of the pack in the league (for a team expected to be top 10 like last season). They really miss Andre Roberson on that end of the floor, and he’s likely not back until December.

It’s far too early to say either of those stats are trends — the Thunder should have one of the better defenses in the league by the end of the season — but they are off to a slow start, and it’s costing them wins, which in the deep West is not ideal.

On the other side of the ball — the Kings have looked solid this young season. The kids are alright. They played Utah tight in the season opener, fell to the Pelicans and now have beaten the Thunder. De’Aaron Fox is averaging 20.3 points and 7.7 assists per game, Willie Cauley-Stein is playing for that contract averaging 18.7 points and 7 rebounds a game, Buddy Hield is knocking down shots, Marvin Bagley is finding his way, and Shumpert went off against the Thunder. The young core in Sacramento is taking a step forward this season, and it’s something to watch.

3) NBA could have, should have come down harder on Brandon Ingram, Rajon Rondo. By now we’ve all read the stories and watched the video out of Saturday night’s fight at the Laker game. Now, we’ve seen the suspensions come down: Four games for Ingram, three for Rondo, and two for Chris Paul.

Adam Silver has been lighter on punishment of players for these incidents than his predecessor David Stern, and that continued here. Ingram’s four games — costing him $158,817 in salary — is the longest the league has handed out for fighting since 2012 (Metta World Peace), but if the league wanted to send a message that throwing punches is verboten, they needed to come in with a heavier hand. Especially considering we are not out of the first week of the season.

The biggest surprise to me was Rondo — spitting in another player’s face is unacceptable. The league needed to do more. (And don’t try to sell me the mouthguard/unintentional line, that’s just spin, Rondo meant to do it). The only suspension that felt right was CP3, and I’m with D’Antoni in that I don’t know what else anyone expected him to do.

The Lakers get hit harder by this — while we get to see more Lonzo Ball they don’t have the depth to replace Rondo and Ingram easily, and their games are harder (Spurs, improving Suns, then the hot Nuggets).

Physical fights with actual punches are rare in the NBA, but when they happen I’m not sold this was near enough of a deterrent. We’ll see if this situation was a one-off or if we see more of these incidents.