Report: Michael Jordan again stays quiet during labor talks after leading owners’ hard line away from the table

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If Jordan wanted to make a statement, this was his chance. After all, he knows exactly where the players are coming from. He was there, 12 years ago, fiery and livid with a group of billionaires demanding that a group of millionaires cover their mistakes. He could have played the good cop, saying that he understood what they were feeling but that this was unavoidable and they can get off the tracks or get hit by the train. He could play the bad cop, saying that the owners weren’t going to allow for anything else to happen to jeopardize profitability and that the players didn’t cut the checks, didn’t take the risks. Jordan could have been a leader, for better or worse. Instead?

His Airness stayed quiet as still air.

From Yahoo! Sports:

After reports that Charlotte Bobcats owner Michael Jordan had become one of the most vocal of hardline owners, union officials were anxious for him to speak up in Saturday night’s meeting. Union officials, just as they wanted to do back at the last labor meeting that Jordan attended on All-Star weekend, were determined to throw back at Jordan many of his old anti-ownership screeds from the 1990s.

As one official said, “He never opened his mouth, not once.”

via NBA owners give players drop-dead offer – NBA – Yahoo! Sports.

Jordan’s not a negotiator, he’s not a lawyer, an economist, or a league official. He’s just a constituent. If Dan Gilbert had stayed quiet, we’d be praising him for coming to his senses and knowing his role. But with Jordan, it just feels like more hypocrisy, talking about the players behind their backs and making money off them through the Bobcats and Jordan Brand, then staying quiet when the players are ready to confront him. Multiple players tweeted disappointment with the GOAT on Saturday, and it’s got to be a pretty big downer to discover that not only is your idol actively working against you, but he won’t even stand up and tell you so.

Maybe reports are exaggerated and Jordan’s not the hard-line ringleader he’s been made out to be. Maybe he was just in New Yorks as a prop piece, another bargaining tactic being used by Stern. But if reports are accurate and he did want to take a line that refused more than 47 percent, not only has he sold out the players, but he then also buckled to Stern when Stern offered the 49-51 band on Saturday night.

If you take out the name, if you take out “The Shot,” the dunk contest, the crying over the championship trophy, the double-nickel, all of it, if you just looked at Jordan’s post-career behavior, his executive decisions regarding the draft and team building, and his stances during the lockout, what would you really think of him?

Trae Young: I’ll be better than Luka Doncic

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Trae Young and Luka Doncic will be forever linked by their draft-night trade.

The Hawks took Doncic No. 3 then traded down with the Mavericks for No. 5 pick Young and a future first-round pick.

Young, via Andrew Sharp of Sports Illustrated:

“The thing with Luka,” Young says, “he’s a great player. I don’t understand why it can’t work out for both situations. I hear [Atlanta made a mistake] all the time. Luka’s a great dude, and I think he’s going to be a really good player. But at the same time, I’m going to be a better player. Just because of my ability to stretch the floor, get others involved, I think I’ll be better.”

Of course, Young was never going to say Doncic would be better than him. But Young didn’t have to address this so directly at all. By going out of his way to make such a bold statement, Young puts more pressure on himself.

So far, both Doncic and Young have impressed. I’ll still stick with Doncic, though. Enough to justify Dallas surrendering that extra first-round pick? That’s a far tougher call and the one the Hawks will be judged by.

Young doesn’t want that leniency, though. He’s aiming to be better than Doncic straight up and unafraid to say so publicly.

Markelle Fultz’s new free throw stroke is… different.

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Philadelphia’s Markelle Fultz is in his own head with his free throw stroke now. (And, likely much more than that, but we’ll stick with the free throws for now.)

Earlier this week Fultz double-clutched a free throw attempt and his stroke was a mess.

Each game that stroke seems to change and the latest one is… different. Very different.

As Vecenie notes, this is actually an improvement in terms of the release, but that doesn’t make it good. Fultz was 1-of-2 in his one trip to the stripe (as of this writing).

Still, I have never seen someone pass the ball back-and-forth between their hands as they go into their shooting motion like that. Very, very odd.

Markelle Fultz’s agent denies rumor shooting woes due to motorcycle accident

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Why is 76ers guard Markelle Fultz‘s shot so screwed up?

Did he suffer an injury? Did he change his mechanics? Does he have the yips? Some combination?

Another theory presented by Brandon Robinson: Fultz got into a motorcycle crash last year.

Fultz’s agent, Raymond Brothers, via Kyle Neubeck of PhillyVoice:

“Markelle and the motorcycle, I saw the article that was sent, 100 percent not true,” said Brothers. “Quote me on that.”

The Collective Bargaining Agreement prohibits players from riding on motorcycles, though this theoretically could have been before Fultz signed his contract with Philadelphia. So, if this is true, there could be even more complications.

But Robinson’s report is too far-fetched to believe. Without more evidence, I’m not buying it.

Judge sounds skeptical of accuser’s arguments in appeal of Derrick Rose case

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Derrick Rose was found not liable during a civil rape trial in 2016.

The plaintiff appealed, and her argument was heard today. It doesn’t sound like it was well-received.

One of the appellate-court judges, Hon. Barrington D. Parker Jr., via Kyle Bonagura of ESPN:

“The main issue in this case is what happened that night between Doe and the three defendants,” Parker told Anand. “And you did a good job of presenting your case that what happened on that evening was nonconsensual, that she was raped.

“The defendants, as I look at the record, had powerful defenses to that presentation, which at the end of the day, the jury bought. You had a nine-day trial and this jury was out in what, 15 minutes? And you lose on every single claim. The jury just didn’t buy your case. No trial is perfect, but your evidence concerning the night in question came in and the jury had an opportunity to hear that.”

Following the trial as it unfolded, it seems the jury made the correct decision. Doe’s case was presented and considered. There wasn’t nearly enough evidence against Rose to find him liable.

That doesn’t mean he didn’t rape Doe. Her accusation counts for something. But at a certain point, if her claims can’t be credibly substantiated, Rose deserves a chance to move on. Police also investigated Rose and didn’t charge him.

The Court of Appeals has not yet ruled on Doe’s appeal, but it sounds like Rose is one step closer to putting this behind him legally.