NBA owners, players back at bargaining table Thursday

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This is good. There is a growing sense of optimism from both the NBA owners and players sides that a deal is there to be had — and now they are both actually working hard toward it.

Less than 11 hours after they walked away from the bargaining table at 3 a.m. Thursday morning, representatives of the NBA owners and players returned to the conference room of a fancy New York hotel to complain about their financial pain.

Sure, there’s some irony there, but in a 15-hour session yesterday the two sides made progress on key system issues. Issues such as contract length, the mid-level exception and other issues that will be the framework of a new labor deal saw progress.

How much progress depends on who you ask. You’ll hear “some” in certain quarters, “significant” in others. Either way, it’s progress and we’ll take it. Especially after talks blew up last Thursday and a storm of pessimism swept over the NBA landscape.

But know there are three key hurdles yet to clear.

First is the luxury tax. The owners want a more punitive tax to keep the highest-spending teams in line, the players do not. Zach Lowe sums it up well at Sports Illustrated.

Sources close to the talks indicated last Thursday that the league had softened the tax ratios, but that the multiplying penalties for routine payers remained. A source close to the talks tells me that remains true today-that the league has stood by the multiplied penalties for teams that pay the tax three or more times during a five-year span.

Second remains the split of “basketball related income, or BRI, which is the revenue that flows into the league. There are those that believe that if a system framework can be put in place, the BRI will slide right into that and not remain such a huge issue. Or to be honest, if the players feel they can get enough give from the owners on the system issues they’ll come down closer to or at the 50 percent the owners want. The players’ only real leverage is to give up points of BRI to get system gains. That’s what they are trying to do, but the players have yet to come down from 52.5 percent of BRI — which is a $100 million difference from the owners offer. That’s a lot of cash. This will not be that easy to close.

Finally, whatever deal is struck is going to leave both sides unhappy. Which is how a good negotiations usually ends. But both Commissioner David Stern and union head Billy Hunter are going to have to sell this deal to their hardline constituents. When larger groups have gotten involved in the past is when talks have blown up. That is a risk again.

But, for the second straight day they are talking. Which is good.

Luka Doncic fined $10k for kicking ball into stands (video)

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Mavericks rookie Luka Doncic got ejected a few days ago for kicking the ball into the crowd, his second technical foul of the game.

That outburst also got him fined.

NBA release:

Dallas Mavericks guard-forward Luka Dončić has been fined $10,000 for kicking the game ball into the spectator stands, it was announced today by Kiki VanDeWeghe, Executive Vice President, Basketball Operations.

The incident, for which Dončić was assessed his second technical foul and ejected, occurred with 3:00 remaining in the third quarter of the Mavericks’ 111-99 loss to the Indiana Pacers on Jan. 19

Players usually get fined $25,000 for throwing something into the stands. But sometimes, they get just a $10,000 fine for that, seemingly if it appears they didn’t intend for the object to reach the crowd.

Did Doncic mean to kick the ball as far as he did?

Who knows? But it seems he got the benefit of the doubt here.

Mike D’Antoni: Not right NBA wouldn’t allow Rockets to trade Carmelo Anthony yesterday

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The Rockets signed Kenneth Faried, importantly to them, before their game against the 76ers yesterday. With Clint Capela injured, Houston needed another big against Joel Embiid.

But the Rockets had to open a roster spot for Faried. Their clear preference was trading Carmelo Anthony. Failing that, they’d release James Nunnally.

Houston agreed to deal Anthony to the Bulls but couldn’t complete the trade because the league office was closed, as is the norm on weekends and holidays (in this case, Martin Luther King Day). So, the Rockets dropped Nunnally, eating the remaining salary on his 10-day contract, increasing their luxury-tax bill and costing him the opportunity to play for a team that could use him.

Houston coach Mike D’Antoni, via Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

“I don’t think it’s right,” Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni said of having to terminate Nunnally. “There’s ways (the league) could have facilitated it.”

What happened to the Rockets was fair in that the rules were clear and applied equally to each team.

But I agree with D’Antoni. Games don’t stop for weekends and holidays. The league office shouldn’t, either.

Teams should have more ability to change their rosters on the fly, because games come so quickly. Halting business for weekends and holidays is antiquated. This is a global, multi-billion-dollar operation now.

The NBA can afford to employ enough people who review trades not to overwork any of them. It’d create a better product and make the sport operate more smoothly.

Stephen Curry slips and falls on wide-open fastbreak, gets ball back, air-balls 3-pointer (video)

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See, the Warriors are fallible.

Though Stephen Curry‘s mishaps coming during a blowout win undercuts the point.

Jaren Jackson Jr. bullies Nikola Mirotic with dunk on him (video)

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Yes, the Grizzlies lost to the Anthony Davis-less Pelicans by 20 last night. Results like that are why there’s thought Marc Gasol could leave Memphis.

But at least plays like this Jaren Jackson Jr. dunk on Nikola Mirotic provide hope for the Grizzlies’ future.

Jackson is a skilled 3-point shooter and rim-protector. Add a mean streak inside offensively, and the rookie could really take off.