Players talk lockout, sticking together at Durant’s event

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Fans are pretty sick of the appetizers — charity games like the one Kevin Durant hosted Sunday in Oklahoma City — they are ready for the main course. They want NBA basketball back.

As it was at every one of these games for the past month, most of the questions thrown at the players are about the lockout. And when it’s going to end.

Like, when Royce Young of Eye on Basketball asked Durant if we’d see NBA games by Christmas.

“I wish,” he said. “But I really can’t say right now. We’re just trying to work to get a deal done. We’re going to continue to play in these games and show the fans that we love the game and we want to play.”

There are a number of things holding up the negotiations, but at the core of it is money — specifically the split of basketball related income (which is essentially most of the revenue that flows into the league). Last labor deal the players got 57 percent of that, now the owners want a 50/50 split (which really isn’t 50/50 because they want to take more off the top) and the players are saying 53 percent (or 52.5 which was their last offer according to reports).

“No, no. Fifty-three. That’s where we’re staying at. We’ve had plenty of talks and we’re not dropping,” (James) Harden said. “We already dropped and set our number at 53 so that’s what we’re sticking to.”

We can debate who is winning the public relations battle, I think the owners are taking a black eye but players who make millions cannot really win that fight. Bottom line, everyone is a loser. But Chris Paul — a vice president in the union — said all the players can do is keep playing games and preaching their side of things.

“We try to explain (the situation) as much as we can, but it’s really hard to understand unless you’re in the situation. But I just want the fans to trust us and know that we’re far from greedy. We just want a fair deal. We want to get out there and play more than anybody. But we understand that at the end of the day, we’re the product. We’re the reason the fans come and we just want a fair deal.”

Most fans just want basketball.