What the Warriors should do when the lockout ends

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“We Believe” seems like it was so long ago. Since the Warriors’ shocking 1st-round upset and follow-up successful 07-08 regular season (the team missed the playoffs, but won 48 games, more than the 4th-seeded team in the East), the Warriors have been a mess. Baron Davis and the rest of the gang left, the team lost anything resembling interest in playing defense or rebounding, and the offense stopped working smoothly.

With Don Nelson and his replacement, Keith Smart, both gone, and former President of Basketball Operations Robert Rowell gone as well, the Warriors are looking for a fresh start. Here’s what they need to do in order to get their new regime started on the right foot:

1. For the love of God, play defense

Defense is really important, and the Warriors don’t play it. The Warriors were a run-and-gun team when they were successful, but they weren’t as abysmal defensively as they have been over the last few years. In the last three seasons, the Warriors have finished 28th, 29th, and 26th in defensive efficiency. If the team wants any hope of becoming successful, they need a complete defensive overhaul.

New coach Marc Jackson has said all the right things about defense since his hiring, and head assistant Mike Malone has a good defensive pedigree, but defense is about more than “effort” or “hustle” in the NBA. It’s about having a solid defensive scheme, and players who are willing and able to make that scheme work. With all the money the Warriors have in defensive liabilities like David Lee and Monta Ellis, they won’t become a solid defensive unit overnight.

Still, the team does have some promising defenders like Ekpe Udoh, and if they make defense a priority going forward on the court and in their personnel moves, they could return to respectability.

2. Figure out what to do with Monta Ellis and Andris Biedrins

Ellis scores at a superstar rate, and can score with superstar efficiency at times. However, he’s undersized, isn’t a passer, and may be the worst perimeter defender in the NBA. Ellis has his passionate believers, but the simple fact is this — if Ellis was that good, the Warriors would not have been so bad when Ellis was given a blank check for both minutes and shot attempts. The Warriors have been shopping Ellis and opting to keep Steph Curry, who is both the better passer and the more efficient scorer, but they’ve been having trouble finding takers on Ellis’ nightmare contract.

Biedrins was once one of the most promising young centers in the NBA, but injuries and the complete deterioration of his free-throw stroke have turned him into a borderline rotation player. When Biedrins goes to the free throw line, horrifying things happen, and it’s had a negative impact on every aspect of his game. If Biedrins can get back to being aggressive offensively, attacking the boards defensively, and making around 60-65% of his free throws (why not give underhanded a try, as Don Nelson suggested?), he’s worth keeping. If not, the Warriors will have the unenviable task of trying to shop both Biedrins and Ellis, who are owed a combined $20 million a year through the 2013/14 season.

3. Get the offense flowing again

Having a run-and-gun offense isn’t just about shooting the ball up as fast as you can. There needs to be some organization to the chaos, and the Warriors haven’t had it. The team wasn’t much better than average offensively last year, and they need to make their offense the relentless, terrifying machine it was in Nelson’s first two seasons as coach by passing and spacing the floor effectively, not just gambling for steals, forcing breaks, and jacking up shots in the first 7 seconds of the shot clock, even if they’re tough ones. If the Warriors can do any of those things, it will be time to Believe again. But with the team’s thrown-together roster and second new coach in as many years, things might not happen overnight for them.

Andre Iguodala’s exit line on CNBC: “Nobody’s going to the Knicks. Sorry.”

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Andre Iguodala is a smart businessman who is heavily invested in tech startups (as are several Golden State Warriors players). That — and the fact he’s a famous NBA player — made him a good guest on CNBC’s Power Lunch show Monday.

Iguodala also has a few good connections to the thinking of the Golden State Warriors’ free agents Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson. Here is his response when asked about free agency and the Warriors on the show.

Of course, he said he expects Durant and Thompson to come back to the Warriors, what did you expect him to say? However, it was the exit line that got noticed:

“Nobody’s going to the Knicks. Sorry.”

More and more it’s looking like that.

Sources have said Thompson is staying with the Warriors since the start, he was never in play. Durant and the Knicks have been linked all season, but suddenly rumors of him going to Brooklyn with Kyrie Irving (and maybe Durant’s good friend DeAndre Jordan) have gotten a lot louder around the league. Brooklyn may be the frontrunner, with the Clipper still on the fringes of the conversation. The Warriors may be on the outside looking in.

The Knicks want a meeting with Kawhi Leonard, but that is a two-team race between the Raptors and Clippers, with Toronto seeming to have the edge after winning a title.

The smart play by the Knicks, if this happens, is not to spend wildly on the next tier of free agents but rather to sit on their cap space, develop and add to their young core, and wait for another star. That seems to be the plan, but how long before James Dolan gets impatient and forces something stupid to happen. For the Knicks, that’s always a concern.

Report: Atlanta trades Kent Bazemore to Portland for Evan Turner

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Portland is always on the search for some quality play and shot creation at the forward spots (something that is a long-running weak spot), and with this trade the Trail Blazers get a little better.

Atlanta is sending Kent Bazemore to Portland in exchange for Evan Turner in a straight up, two-player trade, a story broken by Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN.

Both players are in the final year of their somewhat overpaid contracts, Bazemore will make $19.3 million while Turner will pull down $18.6 million. Atlanta does save about $640,000.

This trade makes a lot of sense for Portland. Bazemore is a quality wing rotation player who averaged 11.6 points per game, is athletic and can create shots. Last season Bazemore was on his way to a career year until a mid-season ankle injury, and while he did come back to the court he was never healthy and the same player. He’s not a knock-down three-point shooter but he has usually been at around 35 percent or a little higher five of the past six seasons (he was down to 32 percent last season because of the ankle injury). This is more than just Rodney Hood insurance, this is an upgrade.

Turner was the guy Portland counted on as another shot creator, but he could not do that consistently or under pressure. He averaged 6.8 points per game last season, shot 21.2 percent from three, and is not a great defender. He is a popular teammate and good in the locker room (something useful with a young Hawks squad), but this is not an upgrade for the Hawks.

Then why did Atlanta make this trade? Good question. The franchise does save $640,000, which is helpful but not earth-shattering. Maybe it’s a favor to Bazemore to get him on a team that went to the Western Conference Finals a season ago and is a threat going forward. However, the best reason may be the Hawks have three young players they like — Kevin Huerter, plus just-drafted DeAndre Hunter and Cam Reddish — at the same spot and this frees up minutes for them to play.

Whatever the reason, the deal can get done soon, before free agency opens.

Knicks fined $50K for violating NBA’s media rules

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Knicks owner James Dolan escalates fight after fight after fight after fight after fight after fight after…

One of his latest battles has been with the New York Daily News, the newspaper that urged him to sell the team. The Knicks have repeatedly denied Daily News reporters access. Barring the Daily News from a recent press conference apparently crossed a line.

NBA:

The NBA announced today that the New York Knicks have been fined $50,000 for violating the NBA’s rules regarding equal access for media.

The Knicks did not allow the New York Daily News access to their post-draft press conference on Friday, June 21 while allowing all other credentialed media who cover the team to attend.

The organization has agreed to comply with NBA Media Access Rules moving forward.

The Knicks released this statement:

“The Knicks acknowledge that we did not comply with the NBA’s media policy, and made an error in interpreting Friday’s announcement as an invite only event.  As we do throughout the year, we have and will continue to provide access to credentialed media as per the League’s policy.” <

This has been a dumb plan by the Knicks. Even executed as designed, it makes them look bad.

The Knicks should be trying to generate enthusiasm around No. 3 pick R.J. Barrett and double-max cap space (which could turn into Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving). Instead, the Knicks are drawing attention to their thin skin and pettiness. And they’re not stopping the Daily News from writing about the team, anyway.

For Dolan, a $50,000 fine is small. But it’s larger than my confidence his franchise will abide by the league’s media rules – which are designed to ensure fans receive information – going forward.

Rumor: Kevin Durant not happy with Warriors

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Kevin Durant‘s torn Achilles in the NBA Finals is the type of life-changing event that could significantly alter his thinking entering free agency.

But we don’t know how Durant was thinking before the injury. And we don’t know how he’s thinking now. He has yet to speak publicly.

That won’t stop rumors, though.

Ric Bucher of Bleacher Report:

the indication from several league sources is that Durant is not happy with the team, and the presumption is that it stems from whatever role Warriors officials played in his decision to suit up. Coach Steve Kerr says he was told Durant could not further injure himself by playing, which obviously proved not to be true. If Durant was told the same, it would give credence to the notion that, as one league executive claims, “He’s really pissed off at the Warriors.”

Jay Williams, who’s close with Durant, said the Warriors misdiagnosed Durant and mishandled public statements about him. Williams doesn’t necessarily speak for Durant, but that might be the best indicator so far of Durant’s mindset.

Do Bucher’s sources have other reason to believe Durant is upset with Golden State? Or are they just assuming Williams is representing Durant’s thoughts? The possibility of the former is what makes this intriguing. But I’m skeptical, especially of someone Bucher identifies as just “one league executive.” That’s light credentials for someone spewing rhetoric like “really pissed off.”

Still, Kendrick Perkins and Brian Windhorst reported on momentum building toward Durant to the Nets. There’s plenty of smoke behind the idea Durant will leave Golden State.

Re-signing with the Warriors might be the way for the injured 30-year-old to maximize his earnings, though. Their max offer projects to be worth $221 million over five years. Other teams’ max offers project to be worth about $164 million over four years. Durant could agree to a delayed sign-and-trade. Of course, he couldn’t actually guarantee Golden State would ever trade him.

So, if he’s that upset with the Warriors, he’ll just leave once free agency opens next week.