We need a season because it’s now or never for Kobe v. LeBron

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It was supposed to be 2009. Whoops, thanks Orlando and your ridiculously hot shooting. Then it was supposed to be 2010. Whoops, Boston strikes again. Then, no, seriously, surely it has to be 2011, we don’t even have the rest of the Cavs to blame it on. Whoops, Dallas denied. And now we’re on the verge of losing our last chance, the last good opportunity we’ll have. There will be a million reasons why losing the entire 2011-2012 season to the lockout would be a crushing disappointment for everyone who cares about the NBA. And inside that million reasons is this.

It’s our last chance for Kobe vs. LeBron in the Finals.

Don’t get me wrong. The stories told in each of those seasons was more than worthy, especially last year’s vindication of the Mark Cuban tactical approach. The Mavericks were worthy champions, Dirk a phenomenal champion, the storybook ending both different and fascinating at the same time. But we need this. We’re not going to have another chance, not with Kobe at anything worth comparing.

The thing is, many will say it’s irrelevant for one reason or another. Kobe’s too old. LeBron would just fail in the clutch again, anyway. The Heat’s super-team makes it illegitimate as a match-up. But there are factors to consider here. For starter’s, Kobe Bryant is coming off the most rest he will have had in four seasons. He’s had time to rest, have surgery, recover, condition, improve (if that’s possible) and get his legs back. He’s going to be his voracious self, only even more motivated to get back on top. If anyone can have a bounce-back season at 33, it’s Bryant. James’ failures have not come at the hands of the Lakers, not for many years. His recent Cavaliers and Heat teams have dominated Bryant. Bryant won both matchups against the Cavs in 2009, and in the four meetings since, the King has topped the champ. James is 10-5 all-time versus Bryant, which is a pretty good record against the best player in the league over the past ten years.

And for all the Heat’s talent, the Lakers feature just as much if not more, though everyone conveniently overlooks Lamar Odom and Ron Artest playing for significantly under market value. The Heat have more star power, the Lakers have more depth and a better overall team.

A Finals contest between the two would settle an age-old debate. Just kidding, it would solve nothing. But it would make for fantastic television, and provide an even better addition to the narrative of both’s careers. James would have a chance to finally become a champion by beating the five-time champion. Bryant would have a chance to tie Jordan for rings by toppling the supposed best player in the world. Live chats, message boards and comment sections would feature enough vitriol from both sides of the debate to bring Vigo from “Ghostbusters II” back to life. It would be a river of bile and it would be incredibly fun to watch.

The two have been linked for the past half-decade, a forced commercial string jinxing their inevitable conflict into oblivion. Yes, the NBA has its fair share of terrible, forced storylines and overblown hype machines. But this one would be worth the price of admission. The two best basketball players over the past four years, with one having represented their conference in the Finals in each of the past five seasons. This needs to happen, before it’s too late. So please, owners, players, if you won’t do it for the fans, will you at least do it for Nike? Poor, unloved, under-profiting Nike?

Nets once thought they were trading for No. 2 overall pick, would have gotten Bulls’ second first-rounder

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A Wizards-Suns-Grizzlies trade just fell apart because the teams confused which Brooks was involved. Phoenix thought it was getting Dillon Brooks. Memphis thought it was sending MarShon Brooks.

But this isn’t the first time wires got crossed in trade discussions.

Former Nets executive Bobby Marks of ESPN:

The closest it’s ever happened – and this is a funny story – is that in 2006, we thought we getting the second overall pick in the draft from Chicago. And we were going to pick LaMarcus Aldridge. And it wound up being that Chicago was offering us their second first-round pick in the draft, which was pick 16. It turned into Rodney Carney. So, that’s the closest that we’ve ever come to backing out or a deal was agreed upon and going from there.

The Bulls might as well have sent the No. 2 to pick to the Nets. On draft night, Chicago dealt No. 2 pick LaMarcus Aldridge to the Trail Blazers for No. 4 pick Tyrus Thomas and Viktor Khryapa. The Bulls got more value from No. 16 pick Rodney Carney, trading up with the 76ers for No. 13 pick Thabo Sefolosha, who was a helpful role player in Chicago then flipped for a pick that became Taj Gibson. In that 2006 draft, the Nets picked Marcus Williams No. 22 and Josh Boone No. 23.

The big difference between this non-deal and the Brooks mishap: It didn’t reach the point active players were informed and details were leaked to the media. That’s harder to walk back and maybe part of the reason the Suns and Wizards still swapped Trevor Ariza for Kelly Oubre and Austin Rivers after the Grizzlies pulled out.

Report: Trevor Ariza ‘checked out mentally’ with Suns

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Why did Trevor Ariza leave the Rockets, who came as close as anyone to beating the Kevin Durant-boosted Warriors in the playoffs, for the lowly Suns?

Money.

Ariza signed a one-year, $15 million contract with Phoenix last summer. That salary likely far surpasses what Ariza could have gotten elsewhere – especially Houston, where the Rockets are wary of the luxury tax.

Predictably, a veteran signing with bad team for a quick paycheck turned out poorly. The Suns traded Ariza to the Wizards essentially as soon as he became eligible to be dealt.

Duane Rankin of azcentral:

According to league sources, this was a “mutual” decision between Ariza and the Suns.

Ariza checked out mentally early in the season, according to sources. After practices would ended, he’d leave before everyone else, when that’s usually an opportunity to bond.

He’d break from the team huddle before his teammates and wasn’t engaged.

Signing Ariza to that contract was always part of a bad plan. He didn’t put the Suns over the top, and that money could have gone to a player with a future in Phoenix.

Sure, it would have been nice for Ariza to lead and mentor more. He could have served as a better example for the young Suns.

But it’s not easy to go from the peak of competition to a quickly lost season. Ariza’s misery was predictable and understandable.

It spread to the court, too. He’s having arguably the worst season of his career.

Washington hopes Ariza will play better there. He’s better cast as a glue guy on a good team.

However, it’s unclear whether Ariza will actually be rejuvenated by the Wizards, who’ve been stuck in their own turmoil. There’s also risk Ariza, 33, has declined due to age in ways that won’t simply reverse in a better environment.

At least he ends his depressing Phoenix chapter. This will be the lasting scene of his time there. Gina Mizell of The Athletic:

Devin Booker calls out Enes Kanter’s defense after Suns beat Knicks

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In a Knicks’ win over the Suns last January, Enes Kanter irritated Devin Booker into pushing him. The Phoenix guard got ejected then had to deal with Kanter’s online trash-talking afterward.

So, this retweet – following the Suns’ win over New York last night – was nearly a year in the making.

Booker:

There are two possible responses here. I’m not sure which is correct.

1. Booker shouldn’t criticize anyone else’s defense before looking in the mirror.

2. Kanter’s defense is so bad, even Booker is mocking it.

James Harden on double-stepback uncalled travel: ‘What do you want me to say? Tell on myself?’ (video)

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James Harden is difficult enough to defend when officiated correctly.

When he can get away with this? There’s nearly no stopping him. That was a big uncalled travel in the Rockets’ win over the Jazz last night.

Harden, via Tim MacMahon of ESPN:

“What do you want me to say? Tell on myself?” Harden said.

Fair.

Unlike that call.