What does it mean for players to organize team workouts?

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From Sports Illustrated’s Chris Mannix:

Durant told SI he planned on getting Thunder players together, likely in either Florida or Texas, for informal workouts in September.

via Twitter / @ChrisMannixSI: Durant told SI he planned ….

That makes Durant the latest in a series of players including Zach Randolph, Andray Blatche organizing team workouts for their guys during the lockout. (Note: How often do you read those three guys in a sentence together on the same subject? “One of these things is not like the other” comes to mind.) But what, if anything, does this mean? Is there any relevance to organizing a team workout during the labor stoppage?

The answer: yes and no. Hold on, I’ll let you recover from that incredibly firm opinion I just laid on you.

Players getting together to hold practices can do a lot of good. First and foremost, it means less time for the players to remember how to play with one another and how to execute the plays once training camp actually starts. Anything to keep those things familiar will help, especially with the younger teams. The coaching won’t be adequate, of course, and specifically, the training could get complicated. For example, if you’re trying to figure out whether your team wants you to gain or lose weight, not being able to talk to your trainer creates a problem. A guy goes in for workouts, and adds five, ten pounds of muscle, only to find out, whoops, they wanted you to focus on losing weight. Furthermore, say Durant’s running point on a practice, and instructs the wrong things for some of the younger Thunder. That’s work that will have to get undone by Scott Brooks in the fall/winter/spring/oh my God it could be next fall. Now, it’s not likely that the Thunder will get into anything that serious. But little things are what coaches focus on a lot, and that has to be a slight concern.

The other biggest reason for these players to host these? It keeps them out of trouble. Look no further than Kendrick Perkins’ activities this weekend  for reasons to keep your guys busy running sprints instead of ordering bottle service. That closeness creates a sense of responsibility. One of the worst attitudes that’s prevalent in the NBA is that of a lack of responsibility to each other as teammates. This isn’t college, and these guys are professionals, on the lookout for their own careers. But look to the Dallas Mavericks for a great example of a team that held each other and themselves accountable to one another. That kind of attitude helped them to be honest with each other, to rely on each other, to play more closely together. The Mavericks weren’t a group of idealistic young guns, they were a slightly mercenary-like combination of veterans. But talking to any of them during their Finals run, they were extremely committed to one another. Keeping that chemistry with an offseason workout can help things.

And finally, maybe the best reason, it’ll keep players in a groove physically. Conditioning is a huge part of the NBA and keeping in shape can be a challenge without trainers to complain. Having an opportunity and a reason to really work hard, versus individual workouts which, as everyone can attest to, can often get derailed for anything from slight pains to just not feeling like it, helps players keep their edge.

Teams like the Celtics won’t organize these kinds of events until at least the fall. They’ve been around too long and want the rest. The Lakers are unlikely to, given how busy each of them are with being Lakers, plus Artest will apparently be in England. But if there’s one team that really needs to use its fairly considerable resources to work together?

It’s the Heat.

The Heat should be pulling every member on a long-term contract back to South Beach and should be holed up in a gym, working, improving. They should be bringing in semi-pros to work with, inviting Durant’s team down for a workout, trying to keep in shape and get better chemistry. It’s not going to happen, but the best thing LeBron James could do to keep out of the spotlight and try and get his career where it needs to go is to start working all the way through this lockout.

Kobe Bryant: I wanted to play for Knicks, because of Madison Square Garden

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Kobe Bryant, who spent his entire career with the Lakers, has said he wanted to play for the Wizards and Bulls.

Add the Knicks to the list.

Bryant in a Q&A, via Frank Isola of The Athletic:

What other teams would you have liked to play for besides the Lakers?

There are some teams … I always kind of dreamed about playing in New York and what that would have been like. It’s true. As a fan, the Garden was the historical arena.

So, I always wanted to be a part of that history and play in it. So, New York was a team … it would have been pretty good to play in that city.

For a while, the best thing the Knicks have had going for them is their arena. That gets them only so far.

They need better ownership, better management, better coaching.

Maybe Kevin Durant will help turn the tide. If he chooses New York, it surely won’t be for only Madison Square Garden.

Timberwolves shut down Robert Covington, Derrick Rose, Jeff Teague for rest of season

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The Timberwolves are all but officially eliminated from the playoff race.

But Karl-Anthony Towns is still playing for something – a projected $32 million more over the next five years if he makes an All-NBA team.

He’ll continue that pursuit without teammates Robert Covington, Derrick Rose and Jeff Teague.

Timberwolves release:

Covington has missed the last 34 games while recovering from a right knee bone bruise, originally suffered on December 31 at New Orleans. Covington had made improvements in his recovery and had progressed to on-court activities, in preparation to rejoin the team.  However, he recently suffered a setback which will require further treatment before returning to the court and as a result, is expected to miss the remainder of the season.

Rose has missed the last four games while experiencing soreness and swelling in his right elbow. An MRI taken Tuesday at Mayo Clinic Square revealed a chip fracture and a loose body in his elbow. The team and Rose are currently exploring further treatment options and he is expected to miss the remainder of the season.

Teague has missed the last four games after reaggravating a left foot injury, originally suffered in December. On Tuesday, Teague received an injection designed to treat chronic inflammation. He will wear a boot and is scheduled to be reevaluated in approximately three weeks. He is expected to miss the remainder of the season.

The language – “expected to miss the remainder of the season” – allows the possibility of the players returning. But the Timberwolves wouldn’t set this expectation unless they were pretty certain the players were finished.

Covington deserved All-Star consideration, and maybe Minnesota would still be in the playoff mix if he remained healthy. He was also heading toward an All-Defensive team before getting hurt. I doubt 35 games, even at 34 minutes per game, will be enough to get him selected now. Paul George, Giannis Antetokounmpo and Draymond Green clearly belong ahead of him. Covington has an outside chance for that fourth spot, though.

Rose had a bounce-back year after it appeared he could fall out of the NBA entirely. He looks like a solid backup point guard. He’ll draw plenty of interest in free agency this summer.

Teague has a $19 million player option for next season. He already seemed likely to exercise it, and this only increases the odds. The 30-year-old had a relatively down season.

Teague’s and Rose’s absences will leave the ball in Tyus Jones‘ hands at point guard. Jones has looked good in a small role, and this offers him an opportunity to prove himself before restricted free agency this summer.

Importantly for Towns, Minnesota’s depth at point guard allows him to play with someone credible at the position while he attempts to finish the season strong. There’s a lot of room to produce for the Timberwolves now, though Towns will likely face double-teams even more frequently.

Report: Suns signing Jimmer Fredette to two-year contract

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The Suns didn’t meet with Jimmer Fredette just for fun.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

Fredette is a relatively high-profile signing because he scored a lot of points at BYU eight years ago and fills a great-white-hope narrative to some.

He’s also a 30-year-old who hasn’t played in the NBA in three years and faced questions about his athleticism even when younger. Don’t count on much.

Fredette’s season just ended in China, where he was dominating. But his high-usage style doesn’t translate cleanly to the NBA.

Fredette won’t change the course of the Suns’ season. They are and will remain one of the NBA’s worst teams. Though they need a point guard, especially with Tyler Johnson injured, Fredette hasn’t shown the playmaking ability to handle that position regularly.

At best, Fredette entertains late in a lost season and gives himself a chance to earn a role next season. The team option gives Phoenix upside if Fredette pans out at no additional cost if he doesn’t.

At worst, he interferes with the development of younger Suns over their final 10 games. That seems more likely.

Did Oklahoma City fan yell n-word at Pascal Siakam? (video)

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Pascal Siakam was awesome in the Raptor’s win over the Thunder yesterday. The Most Improved Player favorite had 33 points, 13 rebounds, six assists, two steals and a block.

He also shot free throws as an Oklahoma City fan shouted something:

Did the fan yell the n-word? Did she yell “Nader,” as in Thunder Thunder forward Abdel Nader? Did she yell something else entirely?

I can’t tell. It’s a noisy arena, and she wasn’t speaking directly into the microphone.

Her shouting drew the attention of a couple Toronto players, though.

Fred VanVleet:

Siakam:

The Thunder should investigate this. Talk to arena workers who were in the area. Maybe fans, too. Racist jeers obviously shouldn’t be tolerated.

I’d be surprised if she shouted the n-word without it immediately becoming a major incident, though. As the Donald Sterling saga reminded us, that’s the type of racism is not tolerated by society. Discrimination in housing and employment – things that destroy lives – get ignored. People can get away with coded racist language and terms with racist undertones some are ignorant to. But get publicly exposed saying something clearly racist – especially the n-word – and a firestorm usually erupts.

Some have suggested she couldn’t have been yelling “Nader” because he wasn’t in the game. That doesn’t hold up. Fans often yell at players on the bench.

Again, I don’t know what she said. VanVleet’s and Siakam’s interest should prompt the Thunder to investigate and explain their findings.