What can NBA learn from NFL labor peace?

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They have labor peace over in the NFL. Well, the players have to vote and some league veterans have a lawsuit that could throw a wrench in the works.

But it looks like there will be NFL football in September as had been scheduled. Preseason games (except the Hall of Fame Game) will take place on time, too.

What can the NBA take away from this? What does the NFL labor peace mean for the NBA?

Not much in terms of the deal itself.

But there is one key thing to take away — this puts more pressure on both sides in the NBA situation to reach a deal.

If the NBA is the only league missing games the repercussions will be severe — to lockout and miss games during the greatest recession this nation has seen in generations will anger casual fans in a way no professional sports league has seen before. Some owners (and players) have estimated it would take four to five years to bounce back to current levels if there is only half a season or less. They underestimate the mood of the public. They underestimate how people will react when millionaires and billionaires can’t figure out how to divide up the fans money during a time of record unemployment. When everyone else is trying to get by on less. It doesn’t matter if the owners or players win the public relations battle, both sides will suffer. For many years.

Also, the NBA was always likely to follow the NFL’s lockout arc — a lot of posturing and not a lot of real negotiating until they were close to missing the start of training camps and games. Until there was that pressure, the two sides in the NFL were not going to reach a deal. Until we see that pressure build on the NBA starting in August and getting serious in September, we are not going to see meaningful negotiations. We all knew that. It doesn’t make them not sitting at a table and talking any less frustrating.

In terms of the contract the NFL and its players reached, things are very different with the NBA. At the end of the day, NFL teams were making money, just not as much as the owners used to so they wanted more. In the NBA, the league says 22 of the 30 teams lost money last year. While we can quibble over the accounting, the bottom line is that plenty of teams are not making money and many of those teams are owned by people who paid a premium for those teams and are leveraged. They are coming in with a harder line, and there needs to be changes in the NBA structure.

The NBA and NFL also are different right now in that the players have not decertified the union sued the league. Yet. While some agents like this hardline approach (an effort to gain leverage and force the owners to seriously negotiate), to do it would be to cost games — the NBA’s offseason is much shorter than the NFL’s and the federal courts are not fast. David Stern called it the “nuclear option” and it would be. It would reset the negotiations. It would mean at least half a season lost. It would be messy. So far, union director Billy Hunter and union president Derek Fisher have balked at going down that road, but the option is still on the table.

There is also this — the NFL is the king of revenue sharing. More than 70 percent of league revenue is shared thanks to massive national television deals. In the NBA, it is less than 30 percent. Call it socialist if you want, but the NBA owners have to get serious about this if they are going to make smaller markets more viable. Especially with the Lakers having already inked and the Celtics about to ink massive new local television deals (currently no local television revenue is shared).

On paper the Collective Bargaining Agreement is drawn up on, the NFL ending its lockout means little for the NBA. The financial structures of the two leagues are different and the NBA will never have the parity that makes the NFL work (one player, like a LeBron James or Dirk Nowitzki, can change games too much).

But the NFL reaching a deal does put pressure on the NBA brethren to get a deal done. Because if the NBA misses games now, they will get all of the anger and all of the repercussions.

So maybe the two sides should sit down at a table soon and talk. It’s time to get serious about this and stop posturing.

James Harden buys piece of MLS Houston Dynamo

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NBA players being minority owners in a soccer team is not new, LeBron James owns a small piece of Champions’ League winner Liverpool, for example.

James Harden is keeping it closer to home — he bought a share of the Dynamo, Houston’s MLS franchise.

“I’m very excited about the opportunity to join the ownership group of the Houston Dynamo and Houston Dash and proud to be a part of a club with tremendous history and a great future,” Harden said in a statement. “Houston is my home now, and I saw this as a way to invest in my city and expand my business interests at the same time. Soccer in general, and especially MLS, have exploded in this country throughout my lifetime. I’ve been a fan of the game for several years, and I know that Houston has a massive soccer fanbase, so it was an easy decision for me when this opportunity arose.”

Harden reportedly purchased a five percent stake in the team.

The Dynamo — a former MLS cup champion and a franchise that has consistently been strong — is primarily owned by Gabriel Brener, and it has boxing legend Oscar De La Hoya as one of its minority owners.

Harden has earned more than $141 million in NBA salary in his 10 NBA seasons and has four years left on the $228 million contract extension he signed with the team in 2017. In addition, he has a large shoe contract with Adidas and other endorsements.

Report: R.C. Buford moving on from Spurs GM role, Brian Wright taking over

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For 15 years, through championships and an unparalleled run of playoff berths and success, R.C. Buford and Gregg Popovich seemed to work as one brain. Popovich was the coach but also team president, Buford the GM, and together they built an NBA powerhouse.

Buford is moving on from that role. Or, more precisely moving up into a new management role, and assistant GM Brian Wright is taking over as GM, reports Jabari Young of The Athletic.

After a little more than 15 years serving as GM, Buford is getting prepared to bequeath the role to assistant GM Brian Wright, league sources have confirmed to The Athletic. Wright will report directly to Buford, who will officially get a new title that some around the NBA believe will be a role helping to oversee Spurs Sports & Entertainment.

When the Spurs initially hired Wright in 2016, he stayed behind the scenes and focused mainly on scouting. But sources have informed The Athletic over the last year Wright has been more involved, even fielding calls and packages for the trade of Kawhi Leonard the previous summer.

Wright came to the Spurs from the Pistons a couple of years ago. That said, don’t expect a big change in how things are done in the Spurs front office. For one thing, Popovich is still there. Also, Wright has an excellent reputation around the league as being smart and a straight shooter. On top of all of that, Buford will remain his ultimate boss, although Buford’s role will change into one of more of a business manager for Spurs Sports & Entertainment.

Young hints there could be more changes coming. Obviously, the biggest would be when Popovich decides to step back in his dual roles as coach and president, but there could be shifts in the assistant GM ranks as well.

Just don’t expect the Spurs to stop being the Spurs.

Exclusive video preview: Dwyane Wade joins America’s Got Talent as guest judge

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Dwyane Wade is retired. He’s got some time on his hands.

But if he wants to spend quality time this summer with his wife, Gabrielle Union, he’s got to get on the set of America’s Got Talent, because she is a judge on the hit show. So, Wade did exactly that and steps in this week as a guest judge.

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In the video at the top of this page, you can see an exclusive of Wade and the rest of the AGT crew watching and judging an insane danger act out of India, a sneak preview of the show airing on NBC this Tuesday night (8 p.m.).

Wade knows talent on the court, but we’re going to see what talents impress him on the stage.

Kings hire WNBA’s Lindsey Harding as assistant coach

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Sacramento Kings have hired former WNBA player Lindsey Harding as an assistant and player development coach on Luke Walton’s staff.

The team also hired Stacey Augmon and Rico Hines on Friday.

Harding played nine years in the WNBA before working as a pro personnel scout and then player development coach for the Philadelphia 76ers.

She becomes the latest woman to serve as a coach in the NBA, joining others like Boston’s Kara Lawson, San Antonio’s Becky Hammon, Dallas’ Jenny Boucek and Cleveland’s Lindsay Gottlieb.

The Kings have a history of hiring female coaches, notably Nancy Lieberman and Boucek.